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Michael Peters & James Marshall (1993). Beyond the Philosophy of the Subject: Liberalism, Education and the Critique of Individualism.

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  1.  6
    The Philosophy of the Subject: Back to the Future.Jim Mackenzie - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (2):135–162.
    The author discusses why the philosophy of the subject has been important\nto postmodernists. The author commences with a discussion on the\nintellectual background of postmodernism and its relations with other\nkinds of philosophy and with history. This paper concludes with a\ndiscussion about Michel Foucault's views on education and training\nand what impact this had on development of policy in New Zealand.
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  2.  13
    Resistance Postmodernism: Signs of Ambivalent Significance.Robert Mackie - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (1):50-59.
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  3.  2
    Education and the Philosophy of the Subject (or Constitution of Self).James Marshall, Michael Peters & Patrick Fitzsimons - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (1).
    (1997). Education and the philosophy of the subject (or constitution of self) Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. v-xi. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-5812.1997.tb00523.x.
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  4.  35
    Wittgenstein and Post-Analytic Philosophy of Education: Rorty or Lyotard?Michael Peters - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (2):1–32.
    (1997). Wittgenstein and post‐analytic philosophy of education: Rorty or Lyotard? Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 1-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-5812.1997.tb00018.x.
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  5.  1
    Refocussing the Subject: The Anarchopsychological Tradition Revisited.Bill Warren - 1997 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 29 (1):89-106.
    (1997). Refocussing the subject: The anarchopsychological tradition revisited. Educational Philosophy and Theory: Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 89-106. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-5812.1997.tb00530.x.
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    Rethinking Conscientisation.Peter Roberts - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 30 (2):179–196.
  7.  6
    Peters and Marshall on the Philosophy of the Subject.Jim Mackenzie - 1995 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 27 (1):25–40.
  8.  3
    After the Subject: A Response to MacKenzie.Michael Peters & James Marshall - 1995 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 27 (1):41–54.
  9.  7
    Defining Literacy: Paradise, Nightmare or Red Herring?Peter Roberts - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (4):412 - 432.
    In the past fifty years, hundreds of definitions of 'literacy' have been advanced by scholars, adult literacy workers, and programme planners. This paper analyses three major approaches to the problem of defining literacy: quantitative, qualitative and pluralist. The pluralist perspective, while not without its difficulties, appears to have the most to offer in understanding literacy in the contemporary world.
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  10. Defining Literacy: Paradise, Nightmare or Red Herring?Peter Roberts - 1995 - British Journal of Educational Studies 43 (4):412-432.
    In the past fifty years, hundreds of definitions of 'literacy' have been advanced by scholars, adult literacy workers, and programme planners. This paper analyses three major approaches to the problem of defining literacy: quantitative, qualitative and pluralist. The pluralist perspective, while not without its difficulties, appears to have the most to offer in understanding literacy in the contemporary world.
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