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Michael A. Peters (2009). Derrida as a Profound Humanist.

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  1.  8
    To Be As Not To Be: In Search of an Alternative Humanism in the Light of Early Daoism and Deconstruction.Ruyu Hung - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (3):418-434.
    Humanism and humanistic education have been recognised as an issue of the utmost importance, whether in the East or in the West. Underpinning the Eastern and Western humanism is a common belief that there is an essence or essences of humanness. In the Confucian tradition, the core of humanity lies in the idea of ‘ren’; in the Platonic tradition, ‘rationality’. For some critics, this belief may lead to violence as much as justice. One way to be aware of the danger (...)
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    Freedom Reconsidered: Heteronomy, Open Subjectivity, and the 'Gift of Teaching'.Guoping Zhao - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (5):513-525.
    This paper analyzes the entanglement of the modern concepts of freedom, autonomy, and the modern notion of the subject and how a passion for and insistence on freedom has undermined the reconstruction of human subjectivity in Heidegger and Foucault, and how such passion has also limited the educational effort at addressing the problems brought to education by the modern notion of the subject. Drawing on Levinas, it suggests that a new understanding of freedom as heteronomy will allow us to envision (...)
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  3.  56
    Witnessing Deconstruction in Education: Why Quasi-Transcendentalism Matters.Gert Biesta - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (3):391-404.
    Deconstruction is often depicted as a method of critical analysis aimed at exposing unquestioned metaphysical assumptions and internal contradictions in philosophical and literary language. Starting from Derrida's contention that deconstruction is not a method and cannot be transformed into one, I make a case for a different attitude towards deconstruction, to which I refer as 'witnessing'. I argue that what needs to be witnessed is the occurrence of deconstruction and, more specifically, the occurrence of metaphysics-in-deconstruction. The point of witnessing metaphysics-in-deconstruction (...)
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