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  1. CEO Hubris and Firm Pollution: State and Market Contingencies in a Transitional Economy.Lu Zhang, Shenggang Ren, Xiaohong Chen, Dayuan Li & Duanjinyu Yin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 161 (2):459-478.
    This study focuses on CEO hubris and its effect on corporate unethical behaviour—pollution in particular, and in addition examines critical institutional contingencies [state ownership, political connection and industrial competition] which may moderate this effect. With data from over-polluting listed firms based on the real-time pollution monitoring system in transitional China from 2015 to 2017, we find that CEO hubris is significantly positively related to firm pollution, and that the moderating role of SO is not significant, that PC positively moderates the (...)
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  • Linguistic Markers of CEO Hubris.Vita Akstinaite, Graham Robinson & Eugene Sadler-Smith - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  • Hubris and Unethical Decision Making: The Tragedy of the Uncommon.Joseph McManus - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (1):169-185.
    The research theorizes how hubris impacts ethical decision making and develops empirical evidence that earnings manipulation is more likely at firms led by CEOs influenced by hubris. The theory posits that hubris impairs moral awareness by causing decision makers to ignore external factors that otherwise drive such awareness. Additionally, these individuals apply a flawed subjective assessment of the decision they face which further impairs moral awareness. The predicted result is that hubris leads managers to invoke an amoral decision process which (...)
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  • Trust, Authentic Pride, and Moral Reasoning: A Unified Framework of Relational Governance and Emotional Self‐Regulation.Martin Spraggon & Virginia Bodolica - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (3):297-314.
    This conceptual article introduces behavioral perspectives into the governance arena and undertakes a psychological assessment of managerial decision making in organizations by elaborating on the treatment of trust and pride in the extant literature. While trust is conceived by governance scholars as a device for monitoring relationships with others, we argue that authentic pride, contrary to hubris, could operate as an attribute of emotional self-regulation allowing corporate leaders to govern the social behavior of their own self. Contrasting the features of (...)
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  • Egalitarianism and Executive Compensation: A Relational Argument.Pierre-Yves Néron - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):171-184.
    What, if anything, is wrong with high executive compensation? Is the common “lay reaction” of indignation and moral outrage justified? In this paper, my main goal is to articulate in a more systematic and philosophical manner the egalitarian responses to these questions. In order to do so, I suggest that we take some insights from recent debates on two versions of egalitarianism: a distributive one, according to which no one should be worse off than others because of unfair distributions of (...)
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  • CEO Hubris and Firm Performance: Exploring the Moderating Roles of CEO Power and Board Vigilance.Jong-Hun Park, Changsu Kim, Young Kyun Chang, Dong-Hyun Lee & Yun-Dal Sung - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (4):919-933.
    This study focuses on CEO hubris and its detrimental effect on corporate financial performance along with an examination of critical corporate governance contingencies that may moderate the negative effect. From 654 observations of 164 Korean firms over the years 2001–2008, we found that CEO power exacerbated the negative effect of CEO hubris on corporate financial performance, whereas board vigilance mitigated it. This study provides empirical evidence that entrenchment problems arising from CEO hubris would be exacerbated as CEOs become more powerful, (...)
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  • Sāttvika Leadership: An Indian Model of Positive Leadership.Kumar Alok - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (1):117-138.
    I propose a leadership theory with moral concerns at its core. Sāttvika leadership is defined as a set of purposive leader actions comprising knowledge-driven cooperation that are initiated on the basis of positive and reasonably accurate assumptions and executed through morally responsible and sustainably fruitful means to secure the flourishing of followers and the collective. SL enhances psychological capital, psychological empowerment, and work engagement of followers while developing them into morally better persons. It enhances their trust on the leader and (...)
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  • Some Antecedents and Consequences of Ethical Leadership: An Examination Using the Kings of Judah From 931 Bc to 586 Bc.W. Glenn Rowe - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (4):557-572.