Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Voting Secrecy and the Right to Justification.Pierre‐Etienne Vandamme - 2018 - Constellations 25 (3):388-405.
  • Hands Invisible and Intangible.Geoffrey Brennan & Philip Pettit - 1993 - Synthese 94 (2):191 - 225.
    The notion of a spontaneous social order, an order in human affairs which operates without the intervention of any directly ordering mind, has a natural fascination for social and political theorists. This paper provides a taxonomy under which there are two broadly contrasting sorts of spontaneous social order. One is the familiar invisible hand; the other is an arrangement that we describe as the intangible hand. The paper is designed to serve two main purposes. First, to provide a pure account (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • A Further Defence of the Right Not to Vote.Ben Saunders - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (1):93-108.
    Opponents of compulsory voting often allege that it violates a ‘right not to vote’. This paper seeks to clarify and defend such a right against its critics. First, I propose that this right must be understood as a Hohfeldian claim against being compelled to vote, rather than as a mere privilege to abstain. So construed, the right not to vote is compatible with a duty to vote, so arguments for a duty to vote do not refute the existence of such (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Democratic Agents of Justice.John S. Dryzek - 2015 - Journal of Political Philosophy 23 (4):361-384.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Deliberative Democracy and the Discursive Dilemma.Philip Pettit - 2001 - Philosophical Issues 11 (1):268-299.
    Taken as a model for how groups should make collective judgments and decisions, the ideal of deliberative democracy is inherently ambiguous. Consider the idealised case where it is agreed on all sides that a certain conclusion should be endorsed if and only if certain premises are admitted. Does deliberative democracy recommend that members of the group debate the premises and then individually vote, in the light of that debate, on whether or not to support the conclusion? Or does it recommend (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Shouts, Murmurs and Votes: Acclamation and Aggregation in Ancient Greece.Melissa Schwartzberg - 2010 - Journal of Political Philosophy 18 (4):448-468.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Markets in Votes: Alienability, Strict Secrecy, and Political Clientelism.Nicolás Maloberti - forthcoming - Politics, Philosophy and Economics.
    Standard rationales for the illegality of markets in votes are based on concerns over the undue influence of wealth and the erosion of civic responsibility that would result from the commodification of votes. I present an alternative rationale based on how the mere alienability of votes alters the strategic setting faced by political actors. The inalienability of votes ensure the strict secrecy of voting, that is, the inability of voters to communicate credibly to others the content of their votes. In (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Deliberative Democracy and the Discursive Dilemma.Philip Pettit - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s1):268-299.
    Taken as a model for how groups should make collective judgments and decisions, the ideal of deliberative democracy is inherently ambiguous. Consider the idealised case where it is agreed on all sides that a certain conclusion should be endorsed if and only if certain premises are admitted. Does deliberative democracy recommend that members of the group debate the premises and then individually vote, in the light of that debate, on whether or not to support the conclusion? Or does it recommend (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • Show Me the Money: The Case for Income Transparency.Peter Dietsch - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):197–213.
  • Legislative Intent in Law's Empire.Richard Ekins - 2011 - Ratio Juris 24 (4):435-460.
    This article considers Dworkin's influential argument against legislative intent in chapter 9 of Law's Empire. The argument proves much less than is often assumed for it fails to address the possibility that the institution of the legislature may form and act on intentions. Indeed, analysis of Dworkin's argument lends support to that possibility. Dworkin aims to refute legislative intent in order to elucidate his own theory of statutory interpretation. That theory fails to explain plausibly legislative action. Dworkin's argument does not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark