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  1. Bodily Influences on Emotional Feelings: Accumulating Evidence and Extensions of William James’s Theory of Emotion.James D. Laird & Katherine Lacasse - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (1):27-34.
    William James’s theory of emotion has been controversial since its inception, and a basic analysis of Cannon’s critique is provided. Research on the impact of facial expressions, expressive behaviors, and visceral responses on emotional feelings are each reviewed. A good deal of evidence supports James’s theory that these types of bodily feedback, along with perceptions of situational cues, are each important parts of emotional feelings. Extensions to James’s theory are also reviewed, including evidence of individual differences in the effect of (...)
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  • Different Strokes for Different Folks: The BodyMind Approach as a Learning Tool for Patients With Medically Unexplained Symptoms to Self-Manage.Helen Payne & Susan Brooks - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Respiratory Rhythm, Autonomic Modulation, and the Spectrum of Emotions: The Future of Emotion Recognition and Modulation.Ravinder Jerath & Connor Beveridge - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Where Do We Stand in the Domestic Dog (Canis Familiaris) Positive-Emotion Assessment: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Directions.Erika Csoltova & Emira Mehinagic - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • How Does the Body Affect the Mind? Role of Cardiorespiratory Coherence in the Spectrum of Emotions.Jerath Ravinder & Molly W. Crawford - 2015 - Advances in Mind-Body Medicine 29 (4):1-13.
    The brain is considered to be the primary generator and regulator of emotions; however, afferent signals originating throughout the body are detected by the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and brainstem, and, in turn, can modulate emotional processes. During stress and negative emotional states, levels of cardiorespiratory coherence (CRC) decrease, and a shift occurs toward sympathetic dominance. In contrast, CRC levels increase during more positive emotional states, and a shift occurs toward parasympathetic dominance. Te dynamic changes in CRC that accompany different (...)
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  • Embodied Mood Regulation: The Impact of Body Posture on Mood Recovery, Negative Thoughts, and Mood-Congruent Recall.Lotte Veenstra, Iris K. Schneider & Sander L. Koole - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (7):1361-1376.
    ABSTRACTPrevious work has shown that a stooped posture may activate negative mood. Extending this work, the present experiments examine how stooped body posture influences recovery from pre-existing negative mood. In Experiment 1, participants were randomly assigned to receive either a negative or neutral mood induction, after which participants were instructed to take either a stooped, straight, or control posture while writing down their thoughts. Stooped posture led to less mood recovery in the negative mood condition, and more negative mood in (...)
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  • Is Emotion a Form of Perception?Jesse J. Prinz - 2008 - In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press. pp. 137-160.
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  • Is Your Mood More Contagious If You Are Likeable? The Role of Liking in the Social Induction of Affect.Klara Królewiak & Monika Wróbel - 2015 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 46 (3):413-420.
    In the present study, we explored the role of liking in the social induction of affect. Dispositional likeability was manipulated by written reports describing a sender as a likeable or dislikeable character. Afterwards participants watched short videos presenting the sender displaying happy or sad emotional expressions. We expected that exposure to the likeable sender would lead to reactions concordant with his emotional expression, whereas exposure to the dislikeable sender would result in discordant reactions. The results indicated that dispositional likeability influenced (...)
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  • Is Emotion a Form of Perception?Jesse J. Prinz - 2006 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (sup1):137-160.
  • Assessing the Effectiveness of a Large Database of Emotion-Eliciting Films: A New Tool for Emotion Researchers.Alexandre Schaefer, Frédéric Nils, Xavier Sanchez & Pierre Philippot - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (7):1153-1172.
  • Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions: Affect or Cognition?Ursula Hess, Pierre Philippot & Sylvie Blairy - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (4):509-531.
  • The Psychology of Emotion Regulation: An Integrative Review.Sander L. Koole - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (1):4-41.