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Michael Philips (1986). The Justification of Punishment and the Justification of Political Authority.

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  1.  27
    The Revolution and the Criminal Law.Adil Ahmad Haque - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):231-253.
    Egyptians had many reasons to overthrow the government of Hosni Mubarak, and to challenge the legitimacy of the interim military government. Strikingly, among the leading reasons for the uprising and for continued protest are reasons grounded in criminal justice. Reflection on this dimension of the Egyptian uprising invites a broader examination of the relationship between criminal justice and political legitimacy. While criminal justice is neither necessary nor sufficient for political legitimacy, criminal injustice substantially undermines political legitimacy and can provide independent (...)
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    Punishment Theory's Golden Half Century: A Survey of Developments From (About) 1957 to 2007. [REVIEW]Michael Davis - 2009 - The Journal of Ethics 13 (1):73 - 100.
    This paper describes developments in punishment theory since the middle of the twentieth century. After the mid–1960s, what Stanley I. Benn called “preventive theories of punishment”—whether strictly utilitarian or more loosely consequentialist like his—entered a long and steep decline, beginning with the virtual disappearance of reform theory in the 1970s. Crowding out preventive theories were various alternatives generally (but, as I shall argue, misleadingly) categorized as “retributive”. These alternatives include both old theories (such as the education theory) resurrected after many (...)
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    Punishment Theory’s Golden Half Century: A Survey of Developments From 1957 to 2007.Michael Davis - 2009 - Journal of Ethics 13 (1):73-100.
    This paper describes developments in punishment theory since the middle of the twentieth century. After the mid-1960s, what Stanley I. Benn called "preventive theories of punishment"—whether strictly utilitarian or more loosely consequentialist like his—entered a long and steep decline, beginning with the virtual disappearance of reform theory in the 1970s. Crowding out preventive theories were various alternatives generally categorized as "retributive". These alternatives include both old theories resurrected after many decades in philosophy's graveyard and some new ones. Only in the (...)
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