Citations of work:

Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod (2004). Toward a Mechanistic Psychology of Dialogue.

110 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

1 — 50 / 110
  1.  3
    Repair: The Interface Between Interaction and Cognition.Saul Albert & J. P. De Ruiter - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (2):279-313.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  6
    Mindreading and Psycholinguistic Approaches to Perspective Taking: Establishing Common Ground.Ian Apperly - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):133-139.
    In this commentary on “Memory and Common Ground Processes in Language Use,” I draw attention to relevant work on mindreading. The concerns of research on common ground and mindreading have significant overlap, but these literatures have worked in relative isolation of each other. I attempt an assimilation, pointing out shared and distinctive concerns and mutually informative results.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  5
    Performance in a Collaborative Search Task: The Role of Feedback and Alignment.Moreno I. Coco, Rick Dale & Frank Keller - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (1):55-79.
    When people communicate, they coordinate a wide range of linguistic and non-linguistic behaviors. This process of coordination is called alignment, and it is assumed to be fundamental to successful communication. In this paper, we question this assumption and investigate whether disalignment is a more successful strategy in some cases. More specifically, we hypothesize that alignment correlates with task success only when communication is interactive. We present results from a spot-the-difference task in which dyads of interlocutors have to decide whether they (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4.  2
    Cued by What We See and Hear: Spatial Reference Frame Use in Language.Kenny R. Coventry, Elena Andonova, Thora Tenbrink, Harmen B. Gudde & Paul E. Engelhardt - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Interacting Timescales in Perspective-Taking.Rick Dale, Alexia Galati, Camila Alviar, Pablo Contreras Kallens, Adolfo G. Ramirez-Aristizabal, Maryam Tabatabaeian & David W. Vinson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    Review of Fischer, Kerstin Designing Speech for a Recipient: The Roles of Partner Modeling, Alignment and Feedback in so-Called ‘Simplified Registers’. [REVIEW]Kim Ebensgaard Jensen - 2018 - Pragmatics and Society 9 (3):490-494.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  5
    How to Create Shared Symbols.Nicolas Fay, Bradley Walker, Nik Swoboda & Simon Garrod - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S1):241-269.
    Human cognition and behavior are dominated by symbol use. This paper examines the social learning strategies that give rise to symbolic communication. Experiment 1 contrasts an individual-level account, based on observational learning and cognitive bias, with an inter-individual account, based on social coordinative learning. Participants played a referential communication game in which they tried to communicate a range of recurring meanings to a partner by drawing, but without using their conventional language. Individual-level learning, via observation and cognitive bias, was sufficient (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  7
    Universal Principles of Human Communication: Preliminary Evidence From a Cross‐Cultural Communication Game.Nicolas Fay, Bradley Walker, Nik Swoboda, Ichiro Umata, Takugo Fukaya, Yasuhiro Katagiri & Simon Garrod - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2397-2413.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  33
    Levels of Communication and Lexical Semantics.Peter Gärdenfors - 2018 - Synthese 195 (2):549-569.
    The meanings of words are not permanent but change over time. Some changes of meaning are quick, such as when a pronoun changes its reference; some are slower, as when two speakers find out that they are using the same word in different senses; and some are very slow, such as when the meaning of a word changes over historical time. A theory of semantics should account for these different time scales. In order to describe these different types of meaning (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  3
    Running Repairs: Coordinating Meaning in Dialogue.Patrick G. T. Healey, Gregory J. Mills, Arash Eshghi & Christine Howes - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (2):367-388.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11.  4
    Interactive Semantic Alignment Model: Social Influence and Local Transmission Bottleneck.Dariusz Kalociński, Marcin Mostowski & Nina Gierasimczuk - 2018 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 27 (3):225-253.
    We provide a computational model of semantic alignment among communicating agents constrained by social and cognitive pressures. We use our model to analyze the effects of social stratification and a local transmission bottleneck on the coordination of meaning in isolated dyads. The analysis suggests that the traditional approach to learning—understood as inferring prescribed meaning from observations—can be viewed as a special case of semantic alignment, manifesting itself in the behaviour of socially imbalanced dyads put under mild pressure of a local (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  6
    Grounding as a Side‐Effect of Grounding.Staffan Larsson - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (2):389-408.
    In relation to semantics, “grounding” has two relevant meanings. “Symbol grounding” is the process of connecting symbols to perception and the world. “Communicative grounding” is the process of interactively adding to common ground in dialog. Strategies for grounding in human communication include, crucially, strategies for resolving troubles caused by various kinds of miscommunication. As it happens, these two processes of grounding are closely related. As a side-effect of grounding an utterance, dialog participants may adjust the meanings they assign to linguistic (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  6
    Working Together: Contributions of Corpus Analyses and Experimental Psycholinguistics to Understanding Conversation.Antje S. Meyer, Phillip M. Alday, Caitlin Decuyper & Birgit Knudsen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  2
    Extending Situated Language Comprehension with Speaker and Comprehender Characteristics: Toward Socially Situated Interpretation.Katja Münster & Pia Knoeferle - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  4
    Social Biases Modulate the Loss of Redundant Forms in the Cultural Evolution of Language.Gareth Roberts & Maryia Fedzechkina - 2018 - Cognition 171:194-201.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  4
    When Do Misunderstandings Matter? Evidence From Survey Interviews About Smoking.Michael F. Schober, Anna L. Suessbrick & Frederick G. Conrad - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (2):452-484.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Automatic Lexical Access in Visual Modality: Eye-Tracking Evidence.Ekaterina Stupina, Andriy Myachykov & Yury Shtyrov - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  12
    From Symbols to Icons: The Return of Resemblance in the Cognitive Neuroscience Revolution.Daniel Williams & Lincoln Colling - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):1941-1967.
    We argue that one important aspect of the “cognitive neuroscience revolution” identified by Boone and Piccinini :1509–1534. doi: 10.1007/s11229-015-0783-4, 2015) is a dramatic shift away from thinking of cognitive representations as arbitrary symbols towards thinking of them as icons that replicate structural characteristics of their targets. We argue that this shift has been driven both “from below” and “from above”—that is, from a greater appreciation of what mechanistic explanation of information-processing systems involves, and from a greater appreciation of the problems (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  19.  2
    Information Density Converges in Dialogue: Towards an Information-Theoretic Model.Yang Xu & David Reitter - 2018 - Cognition 170:147-163.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  5
    What Do Words Do for Us?Ronnie Cann & Ruth Kempson - 2017 - Dialectica 71 (3):425-460.
    In this paper we adopt the hypothesis that languages are mechanisms for interaction, and that grammars encode the means by which such interaction may take place, by use of procedures that construct representations of meaning from strings of words uttered in context, and conversely strings of words are built up from representations of content in interaction with context. In a review of the systemic use of ellipsis in dialogue and associated split-utterance phenomena, we show how, in Dynamic Syntax, words give (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  21
    Alignment in Social Interactions.Mattia Gallotti, M. T. Fairhurst & C. D. Frith - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 48:253-261.
    According to the prevailing paradigm in social-cognitive neuroscience, the mental states of individuals become shared when they adapt to each other in the pursuit of a shared goal. We challenge this view by proposing an alternative approach to the cognitive foundations of social interactions. The central claim of this paper is that social cognition concerns the graded and dynamic process of alignment of individual minds, even in the absence of a shared goal. When individuals reciprocally exchange information about each other's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  22.  2
    Grammatical Constructions as Relational Categories.B. Goldwater Micah - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):776-799.
    This paper argues that grammatical constructions, specifically argument structure constructions that determine the “who did what to whom” part of sentence meaning and how this meaning is expressed syntactically, can be considered a kind of relational category. That is, grammatical constructions are represented as the abstraction of the syntactic and semantic relations of the exemplar utterances that are expressed in that construction, and it enables the generation of novel exemplars. To support this argument, I review evidence that there are parallel (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  2
    Having a Task Partner Affects Lexical Retrieval: Spoken Word Production in Shared Task Settings.Anna K. Kuhlen & Rasha Abdel Rahman - 2017 - Cognition 166:94-106.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  24.  5
    How to Create a Human Communication System.Casey J. Lister & Nicolas Fay - 2017 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 18 (3):314-329.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  11
    Language Use and Coalition Formation in Multiparty Negotiations.Eyal Sagi & Daniel Diermeier - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (1):n/a-n/a.
    The alignment of bargaining positions is crucial to a successful negotiation. Prior research has shown that similarity in language use is indicative of the conceptual alignment of interlocutors. We use latent semantic analysis to explore how the similarity of language use between negotiating parties develops over the course of a three-party negotiation. Results show that parties that reach an agreement show a gradual increase in language similarity over the course of the negotiation. Furthermore, reaching the most financially efficient outcome is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  13
    Processing Conversational Implicatures: Alternatives and Counterfactual Reasoning.Bob van Tiel & Walter Schaeken - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1119-1154.
    In a series of experiments, Bott and Noveck found that the computation of scalar inferences, a variety of conversational implicature, caused a delay in response times. In order to determine what aspect of the inferential process that underlies scalar inferences caused this delay, we extended their paradigm to three other kinds of inferences: free choice inferences, conditional perfection, and exhaustivity in “it”-clefts. In contrast to scalar inferences, the computation of these three kinds of inferences facilitated response times. Following a suggestion (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  22
    Explicit and Emergent Mechanisms of Information Status.Jennifer E. Arnold - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):737-760.
    It is well established that language production and comprehension are influenced by information status, for example, whether information is given, new, topical, or predictable, and many scholars suggest that an important component of information status is keeping track of what information is in common ground, and what is not. Information status affects both speakers' choices and how listeners interpret the speaker's meaning. Although there is a wealth of scholarly work on information status, there is no consensus on the mechanisms by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  2
    Word Learning Under Infinite Uncertainty.Richard A. Blythe, Andrew D. M. Smith & Kenny Smith - 2016 - Cognition 151:18-27.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29.  22
    Memory and Common Ground Processes in Language Use.Sarah Brown‐Schmidt & Melissa C. Duff - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):722-736.
    During communication, we form assumptions about what our communication partners know and believe. Information that is mutually known between the discourse partners—their common ground—serves as a backdrop for successful communication. Here we present an introduction to the focus of this topic, which is the role of memory in common ground and language use. Two types of questions emerge as central to understanding the relationship between memory and common ground, specifically questions having to do with the representation of common ground in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  13
    Environmental Constraints Shaping Constituent Order in Emerging Communication Systems: Structural Iconicity, Interactive Alignment and Conventionalization.Peer Christensen, Riccardo Fusaroli & Kristian Tylén - 2016 - Cognition 146:67-80.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  31.  27
    Using Triggers Without Projecting Presuppositions.Chris Cummins - 2016 - Topoi 35 (1):123-131.
    Presuppositions are capable of projecting from under the scope of operators such as negation, but do not obligatorily do so. This creates a potential difficulty for the hearer of presupposition-bearing utterances, especially given the fact that speaker can use presupposition to convey entirely new information. In this paper, I discuss the potential role of context in resolving this tension, and in particular, I argue that the inferences that are drawn about the current discourse purpose may be materially relevant to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  14
    Collective Contexts in Conversation: Grounding by Proxy.Arash Eshghi & Patrick G. T. Healey - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):299-324.
    Anecdotal evidence suggests that participants in conversation can sometimes act as a coalition. This implies a level of conversational organization in which groups of individuals form a coherent unit. This paper investigates the implications of this phenomenon for psycholinguistic and semantic models of shared context in dialog. We present a corpus study of multiparty dialog which shows that, in certain circumstances, people with different levels of overt involvement in a conversation, that is, one responding and one not, can nonetheless access (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  13
    Investigating Conversational Dynamics: Interactive Alignment, Interpersonal Synergy, and Collective Task Performance.Riccardo Fusaroli & Kristian Tylén - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (1):145-171.
    This study investigates interpersonal processes underlying dialog by comparing two approaches, interactive alignment and interpersonal synergy, and assesses how they predict collective performance in a joint task. While the interactive alignment approach highlights imitative patterns between interlocutors, the synergy approach points to structural organization at the level of the interaction—such as complementary patterns straddling speech turns and interlocutors. We develop a general, quantitative method to assess lexical, prosodic, and speech/pause patterns related to the two approaches and their impact on collective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  34.  4
    Language for Winning Hearts and Minds: Verb Aspect in U.S. Presidential Campaign Speeches for Engaging Emotion.David A. Havas & Christopher B. Chapp - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  15
    Revisiting the Memory‐Based Processing Approach to Common Ground.William S. Horton & Richard J. Gerrig - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):780-795.
    Horton and Gerrig outlined a memory-based processing model of conversational common ground that provided a description of how speakers could both strategically and automatically gain access to information about others through domain-general memory processes acting over ordinary memory traces. In this article, we revisit this account, reviewing empirical findings that address aspects of this memory-based model. In doing so, we also take the opportunity to clarify what we believe this approach implies about the cognitive psychology of common ground, and just (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  32
    Generating References in Naturalistic Face‐to‐Face and Phone‐Mediated Dialog Settings.Dominique Knutsen, Christine Ros & Ludovic Le Bigot - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):796-818.
    During dialog, references are presented, accepted, and potentially reused. Two experiments were conducted to examine reuse in a naturalistic setting. In Experiment 1, where the participants interacted face to face, self-presented references and references accepted through verbatim repetition were reused more. Such biases persisted after the end of the interaction. In Experiment 2, where the participants interacted over the phone, reference reuse mainly depended on whether the participant could see the landmarks being referred to, although this bias seemed to be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  12
    Synchrony in Psychotherapy: A Review and an Integrative Framework for the Therapeutic Alliance.Sander L. Koole & Wolfgang Tschacher - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  38.  8
    Language Processing as Cue Integration: Grounding the Psychology of Language in Perception and Neurophysiology.Andrea E. Martin - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  45
    Imposing Cognitive Constraints on Reference Production: The Interplay Between Speech and Gesture During Grounding.Ingrid Masson‐Carro, Martijn Goudbeek & Emiel Krahmer - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):819-836.
    Past research has sought to elucidate how speakers and addressees establish common ground in conversation, yet few studies have focused on how visual cues such as co-speech gestures contribute to this process. Likewise, the effect of cognitive constraints on multimodal grounding remains to be established. This study addresses the relationship between the verbal and gestural modalities during grounding in referential communication. We report data from a collaborative task where repeated references were elicited, and a time constraint was imposed to increase (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  39
    Mental Files in Development: Dual Naming, False Belief, Identity and Intensionality.Josef Perner & Brian Leahy - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (2):491-508.
    We use mental files to present an analysis of children's developing understanding of identity in alternative naming tasks and belief. The core assumption is that younger children below the age of about 4 years create different files for an object depending on how the object is individuated. They can anchor them to the same object, hence think of the same object whether they think of it as a rabbit or as an animal. However, the claim is, they cannot yet link (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  1
    An Alternative to Mapping a Word Onto a Concept in Language Acquisition: Pragmatic Frames.Katharina J. Rohlfing, Britta Wrede, Anna-Lisa Vollmer & Pierre-Yves Oudeyer - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  2
    Time-Series Analysis of Embodied Interaction: Movement Variability and Complexity Matching As Dyadic Properties.Leonardo Zapata-Fonseca, Dobromir Dotov, Ruben Fossion & Tom Froese - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  3
    Coordination, Collaboration and Cooperation: Interdisciplinary Perspectives.Federica Amici & Lucas M. Bietti - 2015 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 16 (3).
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  48
    Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales: Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation and Culture in Joint Remembering.Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton - 2015 - Interaction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: (i) faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and interactional synchrony occurring at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  1
    Lexical Alignment in Triadic Communication.Anouschka Foltz, Judith Gaspers, Kristina Thiele, Prisca Stenneken & Philipp Cimiano - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  3
    The Use of Content and Timing to Predict Turn Transitions.Simon Garrod & Martin J. Pickering - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  41
    Language as a Values‐Realizing Activity: Caring, Acting, and Perceiving.Bert H. Hodges - 2015 - Zygon 50 (3):711-735.
    A problem for natural scientific accounts, psychology in particular, is the existence of value. An ecological account of values is reviewed and illustrated in three domains of research: carrying differing loads; negotiating social dilemmas involving agreement and disagreement; and timing the exposure of various visual presentations. Then it is applied in greater depth to the nature of language. As described and illustrated, values are ontological relationships that are neither subjective nor objective, but which constrain and obligate all significant animate activity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  7
    Privileged Versus Shared Knowledge About Object Identity in Real-Time Referential Processing.Mindaugas Mozuraitis, Craig G. Chambers & Meredyth Daneman - 2015 - Cognition 142:148-165.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49.  11
    Judgment Evidence for Statistical Preemption: It is Relatively Better to Vanish Than to Disappear a Rabbit, but a Lifeguard Can Equally Well Backstroke or Swim Children to Shore.Clarice Robenalt & Adele E. Goldberg - 2015 - Cognitive Linguistics 26 (3):467-503.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  8
    Overspecification of Color, Pattern, and Size: Salience, Absoluteness, and Consistency.Sammie Tarenskeen, Mirjam Broersma & Bart Geurts - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 110