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  1. ‘How to Write as Felt’ Touching Transmaterialities and More-Than-Human Intimacies.Stephanie Springgay - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (1):57-69.
    In this paper, I invoke various matterings of felt in order to generate a practice of writing that engenders bodily difference that is affective, moving, and wooly. In attending to ‘how to write as felt,’ as a touching encounter, I consider how human and nonhuman matter composes. This co-mingling that felt performs enacts what Alaimo calls transcorporeality. Connecting felt with theories of touch and transcorporeality becomes a way to open up and re-configure different bodily imaginaries, both human and nonhuman, that (...)
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  • Rethinking Inequalities Between Deindustrialisation, Schools and Educational Research in Geelong.Eve Mayes, Amanda Keddie, Julianne Moss, Shaun Rawolle, Louise Paatsch & Merinda Kelly - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (4):391-403.
    Inequalities have historically been conceptualised and empirically explored with primary reference to the human. Both measurements of educational inequalities through the production of data about students, teachers and schools, and ethnographic explorations of inequalities in the spoken accounts of human actors in schools can elide affective histories and material geologies of the earth that entwine with societal inequalities, and political questions of the relation between particular human bodies and the earth. In this article, we question: What might it do to (...)
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  • Thinking Posthuman with Mud: And Children of the Anthropocene.Margaret Somerville & Sarah J. Powell - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (8):829-840.
    This article addresses the problem of writing the posthuman in educational research. Confronted by our own failures as educational researchers within posthuman and new materialist approaches, it seeks a more radical opening to Lather and St Pierre’s question: ‘If we give up “human” as separate from non-human, how do we exist? … Are we willing to take on this question that is so hard to think but that might enable different lives?’ We do this to enable different lives for the (...)
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  • Thinking with Deleuze and Guattari: An Exploration of Writing as Assemblage.Christopher Hanley - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (4):413-423.
    We need to keep experimenting with writing to meet the challenges of Deleuze and Guattari’s flattened ontology in the humanities. The paper reports on a small, experimental research project at a university in the north-west of England. The findings are written in an experimental mode, inspired by the Deleuze and Guattarian concept, ‘assemblage’. The experiment is theorised and assessed in a non-reductive way that offers future creative possibilities to other researchers. First, the paper presents a context for the subsequent experimental (...)
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  • That’s Not Very Deleuzian”: Thoughts on Interrupting the Exclusionary Nature of “High Theory.Kathryn J. Strom - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):104-113.
    In the following essay, I discuss my own uneasy and nonlinear journey from the classroom to Deleuze, describing the concepts and lines of thought that have been productive in thinking differently about teaching and teacher education. I also detail my encounters with the surprising orthodoxies of using Deleuzian/Deleuzoguattarian thought. From these, I suggest that ‘being Deleuzian’ is itself a molar line that serves as an exclusionary mechanism, working to preserve high theory for the use of only a select few. Instead, (...)
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