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  1. Breaking the Privacy Paradox: The Value of Privacy and Associated Duty of Firms.Kirsten Martin - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):65-96.
    ABSTRACT:The oft-cited privacy paradox is the perceived disconnect between individuals’ stated privacy expectations, as captured in surveys, and consumer market behavior in going online: individuals purport to value privacy yet still disclose information to firms. The goal of this paper is to empirically examine the conceptualization of privacy postdisclosure assumed in the privacy paradox. Contrary to the privacy paradox, the results here suggest consumers retain strong privacy expectations even after disclosing information. Privacy violations are valued akin to security violations in (...)
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  • The Trust Triangle: Laws, Reputation, and Culture in Empirical Finance Research.Quentin Dupont & Jonathan M. Karpoff - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    We propose a construct, the Trust Triangle, that highlights three primary mechanisms that provide ex post accountability for opportunistic behavior and motivate ex ante trust in economic relationships. The mechanisms are a society’s legal and regulatory framework, market-based discipline and reputational capital, and culture, including individual ethics and social norms. The Trust Triangle provides a framework to conceptualize the relationships between trust, corporate accountability, legal liability, reputation, and culture. We use the Trust Triangle to summarize recent developments in the empirical (...)
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