Citations of work:

Alvin Plantinga (1967). God and Other Minds.

33 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1.  47
    Two Omnipotent Beings?Aldo Frigerio & Ciro Florio - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (2):309-324.
    The idea of omnipotence plays a crucial role within the framework of classical theism. God is typically considered omnipotent, that is, able to perform any action. Sometimes, it is said that for God there is no difference between will and action; everything he wishes happens. However, as one reflects on the concept of omnipotence, some rather complex questions arise; the range of God’s possible “actions” is not clear. What are the boundaries of the power of an omnipotent being, if these (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  52
    Formal Reconstructions of St. Anselm’s Ontological Argument.Esther Ramharter & Günther Eder - 2015 - Synthese 192 (9):2795-2825.
    In this paper, we discuss formal reconstructions of Anselm’s ontological argument. We first present a number of requirements that any successful reconstruction should meet. We then offer a detailed preparatory study of the basic concepts involved in Anselm’s argument. Next, we present our own reconstructions—one in modal logic and one in classical logic—and compare them with each other and with existing reconstructions from the reviewed literature. Finally, we try to show why and how one can gain a better understanding of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  36
    Rationalist Atheology.John R. Shook - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (3):329-348.
    Atheology, accurately defined by Alvin Plantinga, offers reasons why god’s existence is implausible. Skeptically reasoning that theological arguments for god fail to make their case is one way of leaving supernaturalism in an implausible condition. This ‘rationalist’ atheology appeals to logical standards to point out fallacies and other sorts of inferential gaps. Beyond that methodological marker, few shared tactics characterize atheists and agnostics stalking theological targets. If unbelief be grounded on reason, let atheology start from a theological stronghold: the principle (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  85
    Has Plantinga “Buried” Mackie's Logical Argument From Evil?Anders Kraal - 2014 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 75 (3):189-196.
    In seeking to undermine Mackie’s logical argument from evil, Plantinga assumes that Mackie’s argument regards it as a necessary truth that a wholly good God would eliminate all evil that he could eliminate. I argue that this is an interpretative mistake, and that Mackie is merely assuming that the theist believes that God’s goodness entails that God would eliminate all evil that he could eliminate. Once the difference between these two assumptions, and the implausibility of Plantinga’s assumption, are brought out, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  12
    Must Phenomenology and Theology Make Two? A Response to Trakakis and Simmons.Merold Westphal - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (4):711-717.
  6.  43
    Divine Revelation.Rolfe King - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (7):495-505.
    Divine revelation is a topical subject, given the many claims to revelation in the modern world. This article looks at recent discussion within the analytic tradition of philosophy which particularly relates to how to evaluate claims about divine revelation. The subjects covered are: defining divine revelation; direct cognition of God; evidence‐based approaches; divine testimony; conversion and faith; competing claims about divine revelation. Brief comments are then made on some related areas.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Understanding Omnipotence.Kenneth L. Pearce & Alexander R. Pruss - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (3):403-414.
    An omnipotent being would be a being whose power was unlimited. The power of human beings is limited in two distinct ways: we are limited with respect to our freedom of will, and we are limited in our ability to execute what we have willed. These two distinct sources of limitation suggest a simple definition of omnipotence: an omnipotent being is one that has both perfect freedom of will and perfect efficacy of will. In this paper we further explicate this (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  53
    God and Other Minds.Fiona Ellis - 2010 - Religious Studies 46 (3):331-351.
    I reconsider the idea that there is an analogy between belief in other minds and belief in God, and examine two approaches to the relevant beliefs. The 'explanatory inductive' approach raises difficulties in both contexts, and involves questionable assumptions. The 'expressivist' approach is more promising, and presupposes a more satisfactory metaphysical framework in the first context. Its application to God is similarly insightful, and offers an intellectually respectable, albeit resistible, version of the doctrine that nature is a book of lessons.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Divine Attributes.Nicholas Everitt - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):78-90.
    Focusing on God's essential attributes of omnipotence, omniscience, being eternal and omnipresent, being a creator and sustainer, and being a person, I examine how far recent discussion has been able to provide for each of these divine attributes a consistent interpretation. I also consider briefly whether the attributes are compatible with each other.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  70
    There Cannot Be Two Omnipotent Beings.James Baillie & Jason Hagen - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (1):21 - 33.
    We argue that there is no metaphysically possible world with two or more omnipotent beings, due to the potential for conflicts of will between them. We reject the objection that omnipotent beings could exist in the same world when their wills could not conflict. We then turn to Alfred Mele and M.P. Smith’s argument that two coexisting beings could remain omnipotent even if, on some occasions, their wills cancel each other out so that neither can bring about what they intend. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. How is the Question 'is Existence a Predicate?' Relevant to the Ontological Argument?J. William Forgie - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):117 - 133.
    It is often said that the ontological argument fails because it wrongly treats existence as a first-level property or predicate. This has proved a controversial claim, and efforts to evaluate it are complicated by the fact that the words ‘existence is not a property/predicate’ have been used by philosophers to make at least three different negative claims: (a) one about a first-level phenomenon possessed by objects like horses, stones, you and me; (b) another about the logical form of assertions of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  12
    How is the Question ‘Is Existence a Predicate?’ Relevant to the Ontological Argument?J. William Forgie - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):117-133.
    It is often said that the ontological argument fails because it wrongly treats existence as a first-level property or predicate. This has proved a controversial claim, and efforts to evaluate it are complicated by the fact that the words 'existence is not a property/predicate' have been used by philosophers to make at least three different negative claims: one about a first-level phenomenon possessed by objects like horses, stones, you and me; another about the logical form of assertions of existence; and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  66
    God in Recent French Phenomenology.J. Aaron Simmons - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (5):910-932.
    In this essay, I provide an introduction to the so-called 'theological turn' in recent French, 'new' phenomenology. I begin by articulating the stakes of excluding God from phenomenology (as advocated by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger) and then move on to a brief consideration of why Dominique Janicaud contends that, by inquiring into the 'inapparent', new phenomenology is no longer phenomenological. I then consider the general trajectories of this recent movement and argue that there are five main themes that unite (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14. Thomas Versus Thomas: A New Approach to Nagel's Bat Argument.Yujin Nagasawa - 2003 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):377-395.
    i l l ustrat es t he di ffi cul t y of providing a purely physical characterisation of phenomenal experi ence wi t ha vi vi d exampl e about a bat ’ s sensory apparatus. Whi l e a number of obj ect i ons have al ready been made to Nagel.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Kant on the Dependency of the Cosmological Argument on the Ontological Argument.Donald P. Smith - 2003 - European Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):206–218.
    Immanuel Kant’s well known and thoroughly discussed criticism of the cosmological argument, hereafter ‘CA’, is that it presupposes or depends upon the cogency of the ontological argument, hereafter ‘OA’. Call this criticism ‘the Dependency Thesis’. It is fair to say that the received view on the matter is that Kant failed to establish the Dependency Thesis.1 In what follows, I argue that the received view is mistaken. I begin by rehearsing the standard objection to what is typically taken to be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  33
    Martin on the Meaninglessness of Religious Language.Charles T. Hughes - 1993 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 34 (2):95 - 114.
  17.  12
    Universe Indexed Properties and the Fate of the Ontological Argument.James F. Sennett - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (1):65 - 79.
    If the contemporary rebirth of the ontological argument had its conception in Norman Malcolm's discovery of a second Anselmian argument it had its full-term delivery as a healthy philosophical progeny with Alvin Plantinga's sophisticated modal version presented in the tenth chapter of The Nature of Necessity . This latter argument has been the centre of a huge body of literature over the last fifteen years, and deservedly so. One is impressed that this version of Anselm's jewel is valid and sound (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  23
    Wilshire's Theory of the Authentic Self. [REVIEW]Quentin Smith - 1991 - Human Studies 14 (4):339 - 357.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  6
    Evil and the Best of Possible Worlds.David E. Schrader - 1990 - Sophia 29 (2):40-54.
  20.  17
    Evil and the Best of Possible Worlds.David E. Schrader - 1988 - Sophia 27 (2):24-37.
  21.  89
    Divine Omnipotence and Impossible Tasks: An Intensional Analysis. [REVIEW]C. Anthony Anderson - 1984 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (3):109 - 124.
  22.  28
    The Deductive Argument From Evil.Bruce R. Reichenbach - 1981 - Sophia 20 (1):221--227.
    First, I consider J.L. Mackie's deductive argument from evil, noting that required modifications to his premises, especially those dealing with what it is to be a good person and omnipotence, do not entail that God would be required to eliminate evil completely. Hence, no contradiction exists between God's existence, possession of certain properties, and the existence of evil. Second I evaluate McCloskey's arguments against reasons for evil often suggested by the theist: that evil is a means to achieving the good, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  8
    Christian Theism and the Free Will Defence.David Basinger - 1980 - Sophia 19 (2):20-33.
  24.  15
    The Argument From Design.Bowman L. Clarke - 1980 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 1 (3):98 - 108.
  25.  3
    The Argument From Design.Bowman L. Clarke - 1979 - Sophia 18 (3):1-13.
  26.  3
    Evil and Inconsistency.Michael L. Peterson - 1979 - Sophia 18 (2):20-27.
  27.  4
    On Working Both Sides of the Street.R. L. Purtill - 1977 - Metaphilosophy 8 (2‐3):108-115.
  28.  8
    Unjustified Evil and God's Choice.Richard R. La Croix - 1974 - Sophia 13 (1):20-28.
  29.  49
    Induction and Other Minds.George N. Schlesinger - 1974 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):3-21.
    Plantinga's attempts generally to undermine inductive-Analogical arguments for the other minds are criticized, And an attempt is made to present a sound analogical argument for other minds that can withstand plantinga's and other sceptical criticisms. It is then argued that a similar demonstration of the reasonableness of believing in objects when we are not observing them is also possible.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  76
    Criteria and Other Minds.Alec Hyslop - 1973 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):105-14.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  32
    Crusoe, Friday, and God.Arthur Holmes - 1972 - World Futures 11 (3):319-339.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  10
    Theism and Evil.G. Stanley Kane - 1970 - Sophia 9 (1):14-21.
  33.  6
    Ethics, Evils and Theism.Keith E. Yandell - 1969 - Sophia 8 (2):18-28.