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  1. A New Understanding of Marketing and “Doing Good”: Marketing’s Power in the TMT and Corporate Social Responsibility.Wenbin Sun & Rahul Govind - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 176 (1):89-109.
    The traditional understanding of corporate social responsibility has largely been focused on its downstream performance implications, particularly its associations with firms’ customer market metrics such as customer loyalty, customer satisfaction and customer co-creation as well as financial ones such as firm value, return on assets etc. However, given the close relationship between CSR and marketing that literature has identified, it is surprising that the relationship between a focal upstream construct, i.e. the marketing function’s power within a firm and the firm’s (...)
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  • Inherited Scepticism and Neo-communist CSR-washing: Evidence from a Post-communist Society.Petya Koleva & Maureen Meadows - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (4):783-804.
    The sizeable theoretical and empirical literature on corporate social responsibility and business ethics in Western, developed economies indicates that the topic has attracted significant interest from academics and practitioners. There is, however, less evidence of the practice of CSR and business ethics in non-Western, transition economies, as insufficient attention is paid to the contextual specifications and underlying processes that may lead to different versions of CSR. Therefore, this paper examines the practice and sense-making of CSR and business ethics from the (...)
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  • What Keeps Corporate Volunteers Engaged: Extending the Volunteer Work Design Model with Self-Determination Theory Insights.Susan van Schie, Arthur Gautier, Anne-Claire Pache & Stefan T. Güntert - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):693-712.
    Despite enthusiastic claims around the benefits of corporate volunteering for the workplace and its widespread implementation, the impact of such programs for beneficiaries and non-profit organizations remains uncertain, particularly when employees’ participation is one-off. Previous research suggests that the benefits of CV for employees, businesses, and society are more likely to occur if employees internalize a volunteer identity—that is, if being a volunteer becomes a part of their self. This leads them to sustain their participation in CV over time, maximizing (...)
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  • Explaining Viral CSR Message Propagation in Social Media: The Role of Normative Influences.Patrick Hartmann, Paula Fernández, Vanessa Apaolaza, Martin Eisend & Clare D’Souza - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (2):365-385.
    As companies increasingly communicate CSR initiatives through social media, viral message propagation has become a crucial prerequisite for CSR success. Evidence from two experimental studies, one based on a national representative online sample, shows that social media peers’ endorsement of a CSR message in terms of number of shares, likes and positive replies contributes to an individual’s intention to share it on the social network and thereby participate in message propagation, and that this process can be explained by normative influences (...)
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  • Prosocial Compensation Following a Service Failure: Fulfilling an Organization’s Ethical and Philanthropic Responsibilities.Jean-Pierre Thomassen, Marijke C. Leliveld, Kees Ahaus & Steven Van de Walle - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (1):123-147.
    Prosocial compensation is a corporate social responsibility practice that involves donating money to a charitable cause on behalf of customers as a means to compensate them for their loss after a service failure. In order to determine the effectiveness of PC, we carried out three experiments while also comparing its effectiveness within private and public settings. Experiment 1 focused on the signaling effects of communicating the promise to offer PC to potential customers in the event of service failure. Results show (...)
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  • “Do Good, Have Good”: A Serial Mediation Analysis of CSR with Customers’ Outcomes.Ishfaq Ahmed, Mian Sajid Nazir, Imran Ali, Arooj Khalid, Muhammad Zeeshan Shaukat & Farooq Anwar - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Motivations and Possible Decisive Factors in Employee Participat Ion in Corporate Volunteering Programmes.Pablo Gómez & José Luis Fernández Fernández - 2017 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 8 (8):121-157.
    The purpose of this study is to examine the motivations andoverarching criteria behind employee participation in corporate volunteering.This participation is extremely limited. It seems appropriate toenhance it, both due to the internal benefits entailed for the companyitself, and the external impact it exhibits. With that being said, we stumbleupon several problems set out in literature that are confirmed throughour research. Ignorance of the precise causes and true decisive factors thatguide employee participation in corporate volunteering programmesprevents the development of suitable strategies (...)
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  • Do Customer Perceptions of Corporate Services Brand Ethicality Improve Brand Equity? Considering the Roles of Brand Heritage, Brand Image, and Recognition Benefits.Oriol Iglesias, Stefan Markovic, Jatinder Jit Singh & Vicenta Sierra - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (2):441-459.
    In order to be competitive in an era of ethical consumerism, brands are facing an ever-increasing pressure to integrate ethical values into their identities and to display their ethical commitment at a corporate level. Nevertheless, studies that relate business ethics to corporate brands are either theoretical or have predominantly been developed empirically in goods contexts. This is surprising, because corporate brands are more relevant in services settings, given the nature of services, and the fact that services settings comprise a greater (...)
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