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  1. Do Preverbal Infants Understand Discrete Facial Expressions of Emotion?Ashley L. Ruba & Betty M. Repacholi - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    An ongoing debate in affective science concerns whether certain discrete, “basic” emotions have evolutionarily based signals that are easily, universally, and innatel...
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  • How Language Programs the Mind.Gary Lupyan & Benjamin Bergen - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):408-424.
    Many animals can be trained to perform novel tasks. People, too, can be trained, but sometime in early childhood people transition from being trainable to something qualitatively more powerful—being programmable. We argue that such programmability constitutes a leap in the way that organisms learn, interact, and transmit knowledge, and that what facilitates or enables this programmability is the learning and use of language. We then examine how language programs the mind and argue that it does so through the manipulation of (...)
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  • The Role of Language in Alexithymia: Moving Towards a Multiroute Model of Alexithymia.Hannah Hobson, Rebecca Brewer, Caroline Catmur & Geoffrey Bird - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (3):247-261.
    Alexithymia is characterized by difficulty identifying and describing one’s own emotion. Identifying and describing one’s emotion involves several cognitive processes, so alexithymia may result from a number of impairments. Here we propose the alexithymia language hypothesis—the hypothesis that language impairment can give rise to alexithymia—and critically review relevant evidence from healthy populations, developmental disorders, adult-onset illness, and acquired brain injury. We conclude that the available evidence is supportive of the alexithymia–language hypothesis, and therefore that language impairment may represent one of (...)
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  • The Role of Words in Cognitive Tasks: What, When, and How?Christopher W. Robinson, Catherine A. Best, Wei Deng & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • The Effect of Labels on Visual Attention: An Eye Tracking Study.Catherine A. Best, Christopher W. Robinson & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1846--1851.
  • Distinct Labels Attenuate 15-Month-Olds’ Attention to Shape in an Inductive Inference Task.Susan A. Graham, Jean Keates, Ena Vukatana & Melanie Khu - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Timing Matters: The Impact of Label Synchrony on Infant Categorisation.Nadja Althaus & Kim Plunkett - 2015 - Cognition 139:1-9.
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  • What the [Beep]? Six-Month-Olds Link Novel Communicative Signals to Meaning.Brock Ferguson & Sandra R. Waxman - 2016 - Cognition 146:185-189.
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  • Naming Influences 9-Month-Olds’ Identification of Discrete Categories Along a Perceptual Continuum.Mélanie Havy & Sandra R. Waxman - 2016 - Cognition 156:41-51.
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  • The Role of Language in Emotion: Predictions From Psychological Constructionism.Kristen A. Lindquist, Jennifer K. MacCormack & Holly Shablack - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Speech Facilitates the Categorization of Motions in 9-Month-Old Infants.Micah B. Goldwater, R. Jason Brunt & Catherine H. Echols - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Impact of Labels on Visual Categorisation: A Neural Network Model.Valentina Gliozzi, Julien Mayor, Jon-Fan Hu & Kim Plunkett - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  • Effects of Linguistic Labels on Visual Attention in Children and Young Adults.Wesley R. Barnhart, Samuel Rivera & Christopher W. Robinson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Category Learning in a Dynamic World.Jessica S. Horst & Vanessa R. Simmering - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Labels as Features (Not Names) for Infant Categorization: A Neurocomputational Approach.Valentina Gliozzi, Julien Mayor, Jon-Fan Hu & Kim Plunkett - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):709-738.
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  • Conceptual Hierarchies in a Flat Attractor Network: Dynamics of Learning and Computations.Christopher M. O’Connor, George S. Cree & Ken McRae - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):665-708.
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  • Feature Biases in Early Word Learning: Network Distinctiveness Predicts Age of Acquisition.Tomas Engelthaler & Thomas T. Hills - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    Do properties of a word's features influence the order of its acquisition in early word learning? Combining the principles of mutual exclusivity and shape bias, the present work takes a network analysis approach to understanding how feature distinctiveness predicts the order of early word learning. Distance networks were built from nouns with edge lengths computed using various distance measures. Feature distinctiveness was computed as a distance measure, showing how far an object in a network is from other objects based on (...)
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  • Tracking Multiple Statistics: Simultaneous Learning of Object Names and Categories in English and Mandarin Speakers.Chi-Hsin Chen, Lisa Gershkoff-Stowe, Chih-Yi Wu, Hintat Cheung & Chen Yu - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (6):1485-1509.
    Two experiments were conducted to examine adult learners' ability to extract multiple statistics in simultaneously presented visual and auditory input. Experiment 1 used a cross-situational learning paradigm to test whether English speakers were able to use co-occurrences to learn word-to-object mappings and concurrently form object categories based on the commonalities across training stimuli. Experiment 2 replicated the first experiment and further examined whether speakers of Mandarin, a language in which final syllables of object names are more predictive of category membership (...)
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  • Same Items, Different Order: Effects of Temporal Variability on Infant Categorization.Emily Mather & Kim Plunkett - 2011 - Cognition 119 (3):438-447.
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  • Two- and Four-Year-Olds Learn to Adapt Referring Expressions to Context: Effects of Distracters and Feedback on Referential Communication.Danielle Matthews, Jessica Butcher, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):184-210.
    Children often refer to things ambiguously but learn not to from responding to clarification requests. We review and explore this learning process here. In Study 1, eighty-four 2- and 4-year-olds were tested for their ability to request stickers from either (a) a small array with one dissimilar distracter or (b) a large array containing similar distracters. When children made ambiguous requests, they received either general feedback or specific questions about which of two options they wanted. With training, children learned to (...)
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  • The Linguistic Subversion of Mental Representation.Whit Schonbein - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (3):235-262.
    Embedded and embodied approaches to cognition urge that (1) complicated internal representations may be avoided by letting features of the environment drive behavior, and (2) environmental structures can play an enabling role in cognition, allowing prior cognitive processes to solve novel tasks. Such approaches are thus in a natural position to oppose the ‘thesis of linguistic structuring’: The claim that the ability to use language results in a wholesale recapitulation of linguistic structure in onboard mental representation. Prominent examples of researchers (...)
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  • Psychological Construction: The Darwinian Approach to the Science of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):379-389.
    Psychological construction constitutes a different paradigm for the scientific study of emotion when compared to the current paradigm that is inspired by faculty psychology. This new paradigm is more consistent with the post-Darwinian conceptual framework in biology that includes a focus on (a) population thinking (vs. typologies), (b) domain-general core systems (vs. physical essences), and (c) constructive analysis (vs. reductionism). Three psychological construction approaches (the OCC model, the iterative reprocessing model, and the conceptual act theory) are discussed with respect to (...)
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  • Variety is the Spice of Life: A Psychological Construction Approach to Understanding Variability in Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1284-1306.