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  1. Slavophile Religious Thought and the Dilemma of Russian Modernity, 1830–1860*: Patrick Lally Michelson.Patrick Lally Michelson - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (2):239-267.
    Russian public opinion in the first half of the nineteenth century was buffeted by a complex of cultural, psychological, and historiosophical dilemmas that destabilized many conventions about Russia's place in universal history. This article examines one response to these dilemmas: the Slavophile reconfiguration of Eastern Christianity as a modern religion of theocentric freedom and moral progress. Drawing upon methods of contextual analysis, the article challenges the usual scholarly treatment of Slavophile religious thought as a vehicle to address extrahistorical concerns by (...)
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  • The Enlightenment and its Critics1.Michael A. Peters - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (9):886-894.
    Volume 51, Issue 9, August 2019, Page 886-894.
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  • Geography as the Eye of Enlightenment Historiography: Robert J. Mayhew.Robert J. Mayhew - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (3):611-627.
    Whilst Edward Gibbon's Memoirs of My Life comprise a notoriously complex document of autobiographical artifice, there is no reason to question the honesty of its revelation of his attitudes to geography and its relationship to the historian's craft. Writing of his boyhood before going up to Oxford, Gibbon commented that his vague and multifarious reading could not teach me to think, to write, or to act; and the only principle, that darted a ray of light into the indigested chaos, was (...)
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  • Alexis de Tocqueville, John Stuart Mill, and the Modern Debate on the Enlightenment.Nathaniel Wolloch - 2018 - The European Legacy 23 (4):349-364.
    This article discusses Tocqueville’s and Mill’s views of the cultural progress of indigenous colonial societies in the context of the current debate about the Enlightenment. The analysis of their philosophical outlooks tends to support Jonathan Israel’s interpretation of the Enlightenment, yet with one important difference: while Israel emphasizes the Radical Enlightenment as the chief instigator of the movement towards modern democracy, Tocqueville’s and Mill’s views emphasize the preponderance of the Moderate Enlightenment, which, while sharing the radical advocacy for rationalism, broad (...)
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  • The Search for the Origins of Modern Democratic Republican Political Thought in Early Modern Switzerland.Marc H. Lerner - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):647-658.
    What are the debts that the modern world owes to the political culture of the Enlightenment? For historians of political thought this is a widely debated subject. Throughout Europe, the Enlightenment provided the critical lens for a widespread reassessment of the nature of political authority. Much of the intellectual history of the eighteenth century focuses on this reassessment and the debates over the nature of good government, liberty and sovereignty. The discussion of these issues is linked to the history of (...)
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  • In the Environment of Ideas: Arthur Lovejoy and the History of Ideas as a Form of Cultural History.Daniel Wickberg - 2014 - Modern Intellectual History 11 (2):439-464.
  • William Falconer’s Remarks on the Influence of Climate and the Study of Religion in Enlightenment England.R. J. W. Mills - 2018 - Intellectual History Review 28 (2):293-315.
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  • Andrew Dickson White and the History of a Religious Future.Richard Schaefer - 2015 - Zygon 50 (1):7-27.
    Andrew Dickson White played a pivotal role in constructing the image of a necessary, and even violent, confrontation between religion and science that persists to this day. Though scholars have long acknowledged that his position is more complex, given that White claimed to be saving religion from theology, there has been no attempt to explore what this means in light of his overwhelming attack on existing religions. This essay draws attention to how White's role as a historian was decisive in (...)
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