Switch to: References

Citations of:

Nietzsche and Metaphysics

Oxford University Press (1995)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Virtuous Homunculi: Nietzsche on the Order of Drives.Mattia Riccardi - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):21-41.
    The primary explanatory items of Nietzsche’s philosophical psychology are the drives. Such drives, he holds, are arranged hierarchically in virtue of their entering dominance-obedience relations analogous to those obtaining in human societies. This view is puzzling for two reasons. First, Nietzsche’s idea of a hierarchical order among the drives is far from clear. Second, as it postulates relations among subpersonal items that mimic those among persons, Nietzsche’s view seems to trade on the homunculus fallacy. In this paper, I argue that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nietzsche's Sensualism.Mattia Riccardi - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):219-257.
    The late Nietzsche defended a position which he sometimes to refers as ‘sensualism’ and which consists of two main theses: senses ‘do not lie’ (T1) and sense organs are ‘causes’ (T2). Two influential interpretations of this position have been proposed by Clark and Hussain, who also address the question whether Nietzsche's late sensualism is (Hussain) or not (Clark) compatible with the epistemological view which he held in his previous work and which has been dubbed the ‘falsification thesis’ (FT). In my (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Nietzsche and Amor Fati.Béatrice Han-Pile - 2011 - European Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):224-261.
    Abstract: This paper identifies two central paradoxes threatening the notion of amor fati [love of fate]: it requires us to love a potentially repellent object (as fate entails significant negativity for us) and this, in the knowledge that our love will not modify our fate. Thus such love may seem impossible or pointless. I analyse the distinction between two different sorts of love (eros and agape) and the type of valuation they involve (in the first case, the object is loved (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Nietzsche on the Possibility of Truth and Knowledge.Tsarina Doyle - 2005 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 9 (1).
    This paper examines Nietzsche’s views on truth and knowledge in the context of both his rejection of the Kantian thing-in-itself and his perspectivism. It is argued that Nietzsche’s principal contention with the thing-in-itself centres round the dissociation of truth and justification. The paper argues that Nietzsche’s perspectivism, understood as an epistemic thesis, sows the seeds for the overcoming of this sceptical dissociation.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Exemplars as Evaluative Ideals in Nietzsche’s Philosophy of Value.Jonanthan Mitchell - unknown
    The aim of this thesis is to provide a systematic account of Nietzsche’s philosophy of value by examining his exemplars. It will be argued that these exemplars represent his favoured evaluative practices and therefore illustrate what I will call his evaluative ideals. The thesis will be structured in three chapters, each examining a different exemplar that emerges from a particular period of Nietzsche’s work. Proceeding in this way will allow me to examine what I take to be three strands of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Defending Nietzsche's Constructivism About Objects.Justin Remhof - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):1132-1158.
    Nietzsche appears to adopt a radical Kantian view of objects called constructivism, which holds that the existence of all objects depends essentially on our practices. This essay provides a new reconstruction of Nietzsche's argument for constructivism and responds to five pressing objections to reading Nietzsche as a constructivist that have not been addressed by commentators defending constructivist interpretations of Nietzsche.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology.Paul Katsafanas - 2013 - In John Richardson & Ken Gemes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford University Press. pp. 727-755.
    Freud claimed that the concept of drive is "at once the most important and the most obscure element of psychological research." It is hard to think of a better proof of Freud's claim than the work of Nietzsche, which provides ample support for the idea that the drive concept is both tremendously important and terribly obscure. Although Nietzsche's accounts of agency and value everywhere appeal to drives, the concept has not been adequately explicated. I remedy this situation by providing an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Nietzsche's Metaphysics in the Birth of Tragedy.Béatrice Han-Pile - 2006 - European Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):373–403.
  • Entiteettien kategorioiden onttisesta statuksesta.Markku Keinänen - 2012 - Maailma.
    This paper (in Finnish) concerns the ontological status of categories of entities. I argue that categories are not be considered as further entities. Rather, it is suffcient for entities belonging to the same category that they are in exactly the same formal ontological relations and have the same general category features.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nietzsche’s Autonomy Ideal.Daniel Clifford - unknown
    The aim of this thesis will be to give an elucidation of Nietzsche’s ideal of the post-moral autonomous individual: to give a picture of what Nietzsche takes such an individual to look like, and to show how this picture relates to some of Nietzsche’s most fundamental philosophical concerns. Overall, my argument will be that autonomy, or rather the degree of autonomy that a person possesses, is a function of the power of that person in relation to the other people and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nietzsche's Naturalized Aestheticism.Matthew Meyer - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):138-160.
    This essay seeks to overcome the divide that has emerged in recent scholarship between Alexander Nehamas’s reading of Nietzsche as an aestheticist who eschews the dogmatism implicit in the scientific project and Brian Leiter's reading of Nietzsche as a hard-nosed naturalist whose project is continuous with the natural sciences. It is argued that Nietzsche turns to the natural sciences to justify a relationalist ontology that not only eliminates metaphysical concepts such as ‘being’ and ‘things-in-themselves’, but also can be linked to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nietzschean Constructivism: Ethics and Metaethics for All and None.Alex Silk - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):244-280.
    This paper develops an interpretation of Nietzsche’s ethics and metaethics that reconciles his apparent antirealism with his engagement in normative discourse. Interpreting Nietzsche as a metaethical constructivist—as holding, to a first approximation, that evaluative facts are grounded purely in facts about the evaluative attitudes of the creatures to whom they apply—reconciles his vehement declarations that nothing is valuable in itself with his passionate expressions of a particular evaluative perspective and injunctions for the free spirits to create new values. Drawing on (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Understanding Naturalism.Mario De Caro - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (4):624 - 628.
    International Journal of Philosophical Studies, Volume 19, Issue 4, Page 624-628, October 2011.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Editorial Introduction.Damian Veal - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (1):1 – 31.
  • Transcendental Aspects, Ontological Commitments and Naturalistic Elements in Nietzsche's Thought.Béatrice Han‐Pile - 2009 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):179 – 214.
    Nietzsche's views on knowledge have been interpreted in at least three incompatible ways - as transcendental, naturalistic or proto-deconstructionist. While the first two share a commitment to the possibility of objective truth, the third reading denies this by highlighting Nietzsche's claims about the necessarily falsifying character of human knowledge (his so-called error theory). This paper examines the ways in which his work can be construed as seeking ways of overcoming the strict opposition between naturalism and transcendental philosophy whilst fully taking (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption.R. Lanier Anderson - 2005 - European Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):185–225.
  • Nietzsche's Theory of Mind: Consciousness and Conceptualization.Paul Katsafanas - 2005 - European Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):1-31.
    I show that Nietzsche's puzzling and seemingly inconsistent claims about consciousness constitute a coherent and philosophically fruitful theory. Drawing on some ideas from Schopenhauer and F.A. Lange, Nietzsche argues that conscious mental states are mental states with conceptually articulated content, whereas unconscious mental states are mental states with non-conceptually articulated content. Nietzsche's views on concepts imply that conceptually articulated mental states will be superficial and in some cases distorting analogues of non-conceptually articulated mental states. Thus, the claim that conscious states (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Nietzsche's Pluralism About Consciousness.Mattia Riccardi - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):132-154.
    In this paper I argue that Nietzsche's view on consciousness is best captured by distinguishing different notions of consciousness. In other words, I propose that Nietzsche should be read as endorsing pluralism about consciousness. First, I consider the notion that is preeminent in his work and argue that the only kind of consciousness which may fit the characterization Nietzsche provides of this dominant notion is self-consciousness. Second, I argue that in light of Nietzsche's treatment of perceptions and sensations we should (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Practice of Self-Overcoming: Nietzschean Reflections on the Martial Arts.Michael Monahan - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (1):39-51.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Finding Truth in 'Lies': Nietzsche's Perspectivism and its Relation to Education.Mark E. Jonas & Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):269-285.
    In his 2001 article 'Teaching to Lie and Obey: Nietzsche on Education', Stefan Ramaekers defends Nietzsche's concept of perspectivism against the charge that it is relativistic. He argues that perspectivism is not relativistic because it denies the dichotomy between the 'true' world and the 'seeming' world, a dichotomy central to claims to relativism. While Ramaekers' article is correct in denying relativistic interpretations of perspectivism it does not go far enough in this direction. In fact, the way Ramaekers makes his case (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Nietzsche Contra Darwin.John Richardson - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):537-575.
    Nietzsche attributes 'will power' to all living things, but this seems in sharp conflict with other positions important to him-and implausible besides. The doctrine smacks of both metaphysics and anthropomorphizing, which he elsewhere derides. Will to power seems to be an intentional end-directedness, involving cognitive or representational powers he is rightly loath to attribute to all organisms, and tends to downplay even in persons. This paper argues that we find a stronger reading of will to power-both more plausible and more (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Friedrich Nietzsche.Robert Wicks - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation