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  1. Social Values as an Independent Factor Affecting End of Life Medical Decision Making.Charles J. Cohen, Yifat Chen, Hedi Orbach, Yossi Freier-Dror, Gail Auslander & Gabriel S. Breuer - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (1):71-80.
    Research shows that the physician’s personal attributes and social characteristics have a strong association with their end-of-life decision making. Despite efforts to increase patient, family and surrogate input into EOL decision making, research shows the physician’s input to be dominant. Our research finds that physician’s social values, independent of religiosity, have a significant association with physician’s tendency to withhold or withdraw life sustaining, EOL treatments. It is suggested that physicians employ personal social values in their EOL medical coping, because they (...)
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  • Communication Patterns in the Doctor–Patient Relationship: Evaluating Determinants Associated with Low Paternalism in Mexico.Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce, Angelica Angeles-Llerenas, Rocío Rodríguez-Valentín, Luis Salvador-Carulla, Rosalinda Domínguez-Esponda, Claudia Iveth Astudillo-García, Eduardo Madrigal-de León & Gregorio Katz - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    Background Paternalism/overprotection limits communication between healthcare professionals and patients and does not promote shared therapeutic decision-making. In the global north, communication patterns have been regulated to promote autonomy, whereas in the global south, they reflect the physician’s personal choices. The goal of this study was to contribute to knowledge on the communication patterns used in clinical practice in Mexico and to identify the determinants that favour a doctor–patient relationship characterized by low paternalism/autonomy. Methods A self-report study on communication patterns in (...)
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  • The Role of Evidence in Chronic Care Decision-Making.Fabrizio Macagno & Sarah Bigi - 2021 - Topoi 40 (2):343-358.
    In the domain of medical science, factual evidence is usually considered as the criterion on which to base decisions and construct hypotheses. Evidence-based medicine is the translation of this approach into the field of patient care, and it means providing only the type of care that is based on evidence that proves its effectiveness and appropriateness. However, while the literature has focused on the types and force of evidence used to establish the recommendation and treatment guidelines, the problem of how (...)
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  • Models in the Balance: Evidence‐Based Medicine Versus Evidence‐Informed Individualized Care.Andrew Miles & Michael Loughlin - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):531-536.
  • Analyzing Dialogue Moves in Chronic Care Communication.Fabrizio Macagno & Sarah Bigi - 2020 - Journal of Argumentation in Context 9 (2):167-198.
    Dialogue moves are a pragmatic instrument that captures the most important categories of “dialogical intentions.” This paper adapts this tool to the conversational setting of chronic care communication, characterized by the general goal of making reasoned decisions concerning patients’ conditions, shared by the latter. Seven mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories were identified, whose reliability was tested on an Italian corpus of provider-patient encounters in diabetes care. The application of this method was illustrated through explorative analyses identifying possible correlations between the (...)
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  • Physicians’ Communication Patterns for Motivating Rectal Cancer Patients to Biomarker Research: Empirical Insights and Ethical Issues.Sabine Wöhlke, Julia Perry & Silke Schicktanz - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (4):175-188.
    In clinical research – whether pharmaceutical, genetic or biomarker research – it is important to protect research participants’ autonomy and to ensure or strengthen their control over health-related decisions. Empirical–ethical studies have argued that both the ethical concept and the current legalistic practice of informed consent should be adapted to the complexity of the clinical environment. For this, a better understanding of recruitment, for which also the physician–patient relationship plays an important role, is needed. Our aim is to ethically reflect (...)
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  • Oncologists' Communication About Uncertain Information in Second Opinion Consultations: A Focused Qualitative Analysis.Jamie L. van Someren, Vicky Lehmann, Jacqueline M. Stouthard, Anne M. Stiggelbout, Ellen M. A. Smets & Marij A. Hillen - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Introduction: Uncertainty is omnipresent in cancer care, including the ambiguity of diagnostic tests, efficacy and side effects of treatments, and/or patients' long-term prognosis. During second opinion consultations, uncertainty may be particularly tangible: doubts and uncertainty may drive patients to seek more information and request a second opinion, whereas the second opinion in turn may also affect patients' level of uncertainty. Providers are tasked to clearly discuss all of these uncertainties with patients who may feel overwhelmed by it. The aim of (...)
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