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  1. Visual Attention.Ronald A. Rensink - 2002 - In L. Nagel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
  • Toward a Biased Competition Account of Object-Based Segregation and Attention.Shaun P. Vecera - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (3):353-384.
    Because the visual system cannot process all of the objects, colors, and features present in a visual scene, visual attention allows some visual stimuli to be selected and processed over others. Most research on visual attention has focused on spatial or location-based attention, in which the locations occupied by stimuli are selected for further processing. Recent research, however, has demonstrated the importance of objects in organizing (or segregating) visual scenes and guiding attentional selection. Because of the long history of spatial (...)
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  • Picture Changes During Blinks: Looking Without Seeing and Seeing Without Looking.J. Kevin O'Regan, H. Deubel, James J. Clark & R. Rensink - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:191-211.
    Observers inspected normal, high quality color displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. Display changes could either involve "Central Interest" or "Marginal Interest" locations, as determined from descriptions obtained from independent judges in a prior pilot experiment. Visual salience, as determined by luminance, color, and position of the Central and Marginal interest changes were equalized.
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  • The SwAD-Task – An Innovative Paradigm for Measuring Costs of Switching Between Different Attentional Demands.Magnus Liebherr, Stephanie Antons & Matthias Brand - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The Modeling and Control of Visual Perception.Ronald Rensink - manuscript
    Recent developments in vision science have resulted in several major changes in our understanding of human visual perception. For example, attention no longer appears necessary for "visual intelligence"--a large amount of sophisticated processing can be done without it. Scene perception no longer appears to involve static, general-purpose descriptions, but instead may involve dynamic representations whose content depends on the individual and the task. And vision itself no longer appears to be limited to the production of a conscious "picture"--it may also (...)
     
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  • Theory of Attentional Operations in Shape Identification.David LaBerge & Vincent Brown - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (1):101-124.
  • Electrocorticography of Spatial Shifting and Attentional Selection in Human Superior Parietal Cortex.Maarten Schrooten, Eshwar G. Ghumare, Laura Seynaeve, Tom Theys, Patrick Dupont, Wim Van Paesschen & Rik Vandenberghe - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  • Pre-Cueing Effects: Attention or Mental Imagery?Peter Fazekas & Bence Nanay - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Inhibitory Control Processes and the Strategies That Support Them During Hand and Eye Movements.Lauren M. Schmitt, Lisa D. Ankeny, John A. Sweeney & Matthew W. Mosconi - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Cortical Dynamics of Contextually Cued Attentive Visual Learning and Search: Spatial and Object Evidence Accumulation.Tsung-Ren Huang & Stephen Grossberg - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (4):1080-1112.
  • What is a Visual Object? Evidence From Target Merging in Multiple Object Tracking.Brian J. Scholla - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):159-177.
    The notion that visual attention can operate over visual objects in addition to spatial locations has recently received much empirical support, but there has been relatively little empirical consideration of what can count as an `object' in the ®rst place. We have investi- gated this question in the context of the multiple object tracking paradigm, in which subjects must track a number of independently and unpredictably moving identical items in a ®eld of identical distractors. What types of feature clusters can (...)
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  • The Bodily Other and Everyday Experience of the Lived Urban World.Oren Bader & Aya Peri Bader - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 3 (2):93-109.
    This article explores the relationship between the bodily presence of other humans in the lived urban world and the experience of everyday architecture. We suggest, from the perspectives of phenomenology and architecture, that being in the company of others changes the way the built environment appears to subjects, and that this enables us to perform simple daily tasks while still attending to the built environment. Our analysis shows that in mundane urban settings attending to the environment involves a unique attentional (...)
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  • Diagnostics and Training of Affordance Perception in Healthy Young Adults—Implications for Post-Stroke Neurorehabilitation.Jennifer Randerath & Scott H. Frey - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Attentional Bias Towards Angry Faces is Moderated by the Activation of a Social Processing Mode in the General Population.Benedikt Emanuel Wirth & Dirk Wentura - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (7):1317-1329.
    ABSTRACTDot-probe studies usually find an attentional bias towards threatening stimuli only in anxious participants, but not in non-anxious participants. In the present study, we conducted two experiments to investigate whether attentional bias towards angry faces in unselected samples is moderated by the extent to which the current task requires social processing. In Experiment 1, participants performed a dot-probe task involving classification of either socially meaningful targets or meaningless targets. Targets were preceded by two photographic face cues, one angry and one (...)
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  • Artificial Consciousness and the Consciousness-Attention Dissociation.Harry Haroutioun Haladjian & Carlos Montemayor - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 45:210-225.
    Artificial Intelligence is at a turning point, with a substantial increase in projects aiming to implement sophisticated forms of human intelligence in machines. This research attempts to model specific forms of intelligence through brute-force search heuristics and also reproduce features of human perception and cognition, including emotions. Such goals have implications for artificial consciousness, with some arguing that it will be achievable once we overcome short-term engineering challenges. We believe, however, that phenomenal consciousness cannot be implemented in machines. This becomes (...)
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  • Flexible Cognitive Resources: Competitive Content Maps for Attention and Memory.Steven L. Franconeri, George A. Alvarez & Patrick Cavanagh - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):134-141.
  • Visual Attention.Marvin Chun & Jeremy Wolfe - 2001 - In E. B. Goldstein (ed.), Blackwell Handbook of Perception. Blackwell. pp. 2--335.
  • Failures to See: Attentive Blank Stares Revealed by Change Blindness.Gideon P. Caplovitz, Robert Fendrich & Howard C. Hughes - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):877-886.
    Change blindness illustrates a remarkable limitation in visual processing by demonstrating that substantial changes in a visual scene can go undetected. Because these changes can ultimately be detected using top–down driven search processes, many theories assign a central role to spatial attention in overcoming change blindness. Surprisingly, it has been reported that change blindness can occur during blink-contingent changes even when observers fixate the changing location [O’Regan, J. K., Deubel, H., Clark, J. J., & Rensink, R. A. . Picture changes (...)
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  • A World Unglued: Simultanagnosia as a Spatial Restriction of Attention.Kirsten A. Dalrymple, Jason J. S. Barton & Alan Kingstone - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • Early Dissociation Between Neural Signatures of Endogenous Spatial Attention and Perceptual Awareness During Visual Masking.Valentin Wyart, Stanislas Dehaene & Catherine Tallon-Baudry - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  • A Dual-Stage Two-Phase Model of Selective Attention.Ronald Hübner, Marco Steinhauser & Carola Lehle - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (3):759-784.
  • An Integrated Theory of Attention and Decision Making in Visual Signal Detection.Philip L. Smith & Roger Ratcliff - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (2):283-317.
  • A Theory of Eye Movements During Target Acquisition.Gregory J. Zelinsky - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (4):787-835.
  • An Instance Theory of Attention and Memory.Gordon D. Logan - 2002 - Psychological Review 109 (2):376-400.
  • Attention Gating in Short-Term Visual Memory.Adam Reeves & George Sperling - 1986 - Psychological Review 93 (2):180-206.
  • Forty-Five Years After Broadbent : Still No Identification Without Attention.Joel Lachter, Kenneth I. Forster & Eric Ruthruff - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (4):880-913.
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  • Mindfulness Training Affects Attention—Or is It Attentional Effort?Christian Gaden Jensen, Signe Vangkilde, Vibe Frokjaer & Steen G. Hasselbalch - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (1):106-123.
  • Attention as Inference: Selection is Probabilistic; Responses Are All-or-None Samples.Edward Vul, Deborah Hanus & Nancy Kanwisher - 2009 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 138 (4):546-560.
  • Object-Based Attentional Selection—Grouped Arrays or Spatially Invariant Representations?: Comment on Vecera and Farah.Arthur F. Kramer, Timothy A. Weber & Stephen E. Watson - 1997 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 126 (1):3-13.
  • Piecemeal Organization and Cognitive Components in Object Perception: Perceptually Coupled Responses to Moving Objects.Julian Hochberg & Mary A. Peterson - 1987 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (4):370-380.
  • Attention: Reaction Time and Accuracy Reveal Different Mechanisms.William Prinzmetal, Christin McCool & Samuel Park - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (1):73-92.
  • Anticipating by Pigeons Depends on Local Statistical Information in a Serial Response Time Task.Alyson L. Froehlich, Walter T. Herbranson, Julia D. Loper, David M. Wood & Charles P. Shimp - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 133 (1):31-45.
  • Basics for Sensorimotor Information Processing: Some Implications for Learning.Franck Vidal, Cã©Dric Meckler & Thierry Hasbroucq - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Age Does Not Count: Resilience of Quantity Processing in Healthy Ageing.Anna Lambrechts, Vyacheslav Karolis, Sara Garcia, Jennifer Obende & Marinella Cappelletti - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  • Does Attentional Selectivity in the Flanker Task Improve Discretely or Gradually?Ronald Hübner & Lisa Töbel - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • The Neural Basis of Attentional Control in Visual Search.Martin Eimer - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (10):526-535.
  • Attention as an Effect Not a Cause.Richard J. Krauzlis, Anil Bollimunta, Fabrice Arcizet & Lupeng Wang - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (9):457-464.
  • Examining the Role of Attention and Sensory Stimulation in the Attentional Repulsion Effect.Anna M. Petersson, Matthew D. Hilchey & Jay Pratt - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Internal Attention to Features in Visual Short-Term Memory Guides Object Learning.Judith E. Fan & Nicholas B. Turk-Browne - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):292-308.
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  • An Opportunity Cost Model of Subjective Effort and Task Performance.Robert Kurzban, Angela Duckworth, Joseph W. Kable & Justus Myers - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):661-679.
    Why does performing certain tasks cause the aversive experience of mental effort and concomitant deterioration in task performance? One explanation posits a physical resource that is depleted over time. We propose an alternative explanation that centers on mental representations of the costs and benefits associated with task performance. Specifically, certain computational mechanisms, especially those associated with executive function, can be deployed for only a limited number of simultaneous tasks at any given moment. Consequently, the deployment of these computational mechanisms carries (...)
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  • Objects and Attention: The State of the Art.Brian J. Scholl - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):1-46.
  • Predictable Locations Aid Early Object Name Learning.Viridiana L. Benitez & Linda B. Smith - 2012 - Cognition 125 (3):339-352.
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  • Visual Indexes, Preconceptual Objects, and Situated Vision.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):127-158.
    This paper argues that a theory of situated vision, suited for the dual purposes of object recognition and the control of action, will have to provide something more than a system that constructs a conceptual representation from visual stimuli: it will also need to provide a special kind of direct (preconceptual, unmediated) connection between elements of a visual representation and certain elements in the world. Like natural language demonstratives (such as `this' or `that') this direct connection allows entities to be (...)
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  • Feature-Placing and Proto-Objects.Austen Clark - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):443-469.
    This paper contrasts three different schemes of reference relevant to understanding systems of perceptual representation: a location-based system dubbed "feature-placing", a system of "visual indices" referring to things called "proto-objects", and the full sortal-based individuation allowed by a natural language. The first three sections summarize some of the key arguments (in Clark, 2000) to the effect that the early, parallel, and pre-attentive registration of sensory features itself constitutes a simple system of nonconceptual mental representation. In particular, feature integration--perceiving something as (...)
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  • What You See is What You Set: Sustained Inattentional Blindness and the Capture of Awareness.Steve Most, Brian J. Scholl, E. Clifford & Daniel J. Simons - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (1):217-242.
  • A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.J. Kevin O'Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):883-917.
    Many current neurophysiological, psychophysical, and psychological approaches to vision rest on the idea that when we see, the brain produces an internal representation of the world. The activation of this internal representation is assumed to give rise to the experience of seeing. The problem with this kind of approach is that it leaves unexplained how the existence of such a detailed internal representation might produce visual consciousness. An alternative proposal is made here. We propose that seeing is a way of (...)
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  • Deficits in Reflexive Covert Attention Following Cerebellar Injury.Christopher L. Striemer, David Cantelmi, Michael D. Cusimano, James A. Danckert & Tom A. Schweizer - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Decoding Covert Shifts of Attention Induced by Ambiguous Visuospatial Cues.Romain E. Trachel, Maureen Clerc & Thomas G. Brochier - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • The Color Red Attracts Attention in an Emotional Context. An ERP Study.Michał Kuniecki, Joanna Pilarczyk & Szymon Wichary - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Audiovisual Crossmodal Cuing Effects in Front and Rear Space.Jae Lee & Charles Spence - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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