Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. El método y el objeto de la teoría jurídica: La ambigüedad interno-externo.María Cristina Redondo - 2018 - Análisis Filosófico 38 (2):115-156.
    El propósito principal de este trabajo es presentar un argumento crítico aplicable a aquellas posiciones interpretativistas según las cuales, en la medida en que el objetivo de la teoría jurídica es identificar y explicar conceptos institucionales, es imprescindible asumir la necesidad de un punto de vista interno. Una parte substancial del artículo está dedicada, por una parte, a mostrar la ambigüedad de esta tesis y, por otra, a justificar la distinción entre dos sentidos, uno epistemológico y otro pragmático, en los (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Institutionality Of Legal Validity.Kenneth M. Ehrenberg - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    The most influential theory of law in current analytic legal philosophy is legal positivism, which generally understands law to be a kind of institution. The most influential theory of institutions in current analytic social philosophy is that of John Searle. One would hope that the two theories are compatible, and in many ways they certainly are. But one incompatibility that still needs ironing out involves the relation of the social rule that undergirds the validity of any legal system (H.L.A. Hart's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Incorporationism, Conventionality, and the Practical Difference Thesis: Jules L. Coleman.Jules L. Coleman - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (4):381-425.
    H.L.A. Hart's The Concept of Law is the most important and influential book in the legal positivist tradition. Though its importance is undisputed, there is a good deal less consensus regarding its core commitments, both methodological and substantive. With the exception of an occasional essay, Hart neither further developed nor revised his position beyond the argument of the book. The burden of shaping the prevailing understanding of his views, therefore, has fallen to others: notably, Joseph Raz among positivists, and Ronald (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Was Austin Right After All? On the Role of Sanctions in a Theory of Law.Frederick Schauer - 2010 - Ratio Juris 23 (1):1-21.
    In modern jurisprudence it is taken as axiomatic that John Austin's sanction-based account of law and legal obligation was demolished in H.L.A. Hart's The Concept of Law, but Hart's victory and the deficiencies of the Austinian account may not be so clear. Not only does the alleged linguistic distinction between being obliged and having an obligation fail to provide as much support for the idea of a sanction-independent legal obligation as is commonly thought, but the soundness of Hart's claims, as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations