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Presuppositions of India's Philosophies

Motilal Banarsidass Publishers (1963)

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  1. The Soteriology of Role-Play in the Bhagavad Gītā.Geoffrey R. Ashton - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (1):1-23.
    I will here apply the classical Indian model of the dramatic actor as a methodology for interpreting the soteriological psychology of the Bhagavad Gītā, paying special attention to the usefulness of this approach for clarifying Kṛṣṇa's rationale in showing his divine form in Chapter 11. I argue that the Gītā advocates creative role-play as both the means and the end of liberation. Further, while Kṛṣṇa's teachings can be understood in terms of orthodox Hindu soteriologies that have in view an overcoming (...)
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  • Surprising Bedfellows: Vaiṣṇava and Shī‘a Alliance in Kavi Āriph’s ‘Tale of Lālmon’a Alliance in Kavi Āriph’s ‘Tale of Lālmon’. [REVIEW]Tony K. Stewart - 1999 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 3 (3):265-298.
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  • On Engaging Philosophically with Indian Philosophical Texts.John Taber - 2013 - .
    This essay considers why English-speaking scholars have been inclined to engage Indian philosophical materials “philosophically,” as opposed to purely historically. That is to say, they have tended to ask questions about the philosophical significance and even validity of the theories they encounter in Indian philosophical writings, often approaching them critically in the way philosophers assess contemporary philosophical ideas. I first attempt to explain how this phenomenon has come about. Then I attempt to justify the philosophical approach to the study of (...)
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  • Reconciling Dualism and Non-Dualism: Three Arguments in Vijñānabhikṣu’s Bhedābheda Vedānta. [REVIEW]Andrew J. Nicholson - 2007 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (4):371-403.
    The late 16th century Indian philosopher Vijñānabhikṣu is most well known today for his commentaries on Sāṃkhya and Yoga texts. However, the majority of his extant corpus belongs to the tradition of Bhedābheda (Difference and Non-Difference) Vedānta. This article elucidates three Vedāntic arguments from Vijñānabhikṣu’s voluminous commentary on the Brahma Sūtra, entitled Vijñānāmṛtabhāṣya (Commentary on the Nectar of Knowledge). The first section of the article explores the meaning of bhedābheda, showing that in Vijñānabhikṣu’s understanding, “difference and non-difference” does not entail (...)
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  • Hick and Radhakrishnan on Religious Diversity: Back to the Kantian Noumenon.Ankur Barua - 2015 - Sophia 54 (2):181-200.
    We shall examine some conceptual tensions in Hick’s ‘pluralism’ in the light of S. Radhakrishnan’s reformulation of classical Advaita. Hick himself often quoted Radhakrishnan’s translations from the Hindu scriptures in support of his own claims about divine ineffability, transformative experience and religious pluralism. However, while Hick developed these themes partly through an adaptation of Kantian epistemology, Radhakrishnan derived them ultimately from Śaṁkara, and these two distinctive points of origin lead to somewhat different types of reconstruction of the diversity of world (...)
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  • The Design Argument in Classical Hindu Thought.C. Mackenzie Brown - 2008 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 12 (2):103-151.
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  • Double Negation in Buddhist Logic.Hans G. Herzberger - 1975 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 3 (1-2):3-16.
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  • Śiva and the Ubiquity of Consciousness: The Spaciousness of an Artful Yogi. [REVIEW]Harvey P. Alper - 1979 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 7 (4):345-407.
  • Being Hindu or Being Human: A Reappraisal of the Puruṣārtha S. [REVIEW]Donald R. Davis - 2004 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 8 (1-3):1-27.
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  • The Examination of Conditioned Entities and the Examination of Reality.Paul Nietupski - 1996 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (2):103-143.
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  • The Yogī and the Goddess.Nicholas F. Gier - 1997 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 1 (2):265-287.
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  • Appayya’s Vedānta and Nīlakaṇṭha’s Vedāntakataka.Christopher Minkowski - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (1):95-114.
    The seventeenth century author Nīlakaṇṭha Caturdhara wrote several works criticising the Vedāntic theology of the sixteenth century author, Appayya Dīkṣita. In one of these works, the Vedāntakataka, Nīlakaṇṭha picks out two doctrines for criticism: that the liberated soul becomes the Lord, and that souls thus liberated remain the Lord until all other souls are liberated. These doctrines appear both in Appayya’s Advaitin and in his Śivādvaitin writings. They appear to be ones to which Appayya was committed. They raise theological and (...)
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  • Role Ethics or Ethics of Role-Play? A Comparative Critical Analysis of the Ethics of Confucianism and the Bhagavad Gītā.Geoffrey Ashton - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (1):1-21.
    Both Confucianism and the Bhagavad Gītā emphasize the moral authority of social roles. But how deep does the likeness between these ethical philosophies run? In this essay I focus upon two significant points of comparison between the role-based ethics of Confucianism and the Gītā: (1) the interrelation between formalized social roles and family feeling, and (2) the religious dimension of moral action. How is it that Confucians ground their social roles in family feeling, while the Gītā emphasizes rupture between role (...)
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  • Whose Platonism?Will Rasmussen - 2005 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 9 (1-3):131-152.
  • Māyā and Radical Particularity: Can Particular Persons Be One with Brahman? [REVIEW]Henry Simoni-Wastila - 2002 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 6 (1):1-18.
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