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  1. Attentional State: From Automatic Detection to Willful Focused Concentration.Andrew And Alexander Fingelkurts - 2015 - In G. Marchetti, G. Benedetti & A. Alharbi (eds.), Attantion and Meaning. The Attentional Basis of Meaning. Nova Science Publishers. pp. 133-150.
    Despite the fact that attention is a core property of all perceptual and cognitive operations, our understanding of its neurophysiological mechanisms is far from complete. There are many theoretical models that try to fill this gap in knowledge, though practically all of them concentrate only on either involuntary (bottom-up) or voluntarily (top-down) aspect of attention. At the same time, both aspects of attention are rather integrated in the living brain. In this chapter we attempt to conceptualise both aspects of attentional (...)
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  • The Choreography of the Soul: A Psychedelic Philosophy of Consciousness.Ed D'Angelo - manuscript
    This is a 2018 revision of my 1988 dissertation "The Choreography of the Soul" with a new Forward, a new Conclusion, a substantially revised Preface and Introduction, and many improvements to the body of the work. However, the thesis remains the same. A theory of consciousness and trance states--including psychedelic experience--is developed. Consciousness can be analyzed into two distinct but generally interrelated systems, which I call System X and System Y. System X is the emotional-visceral-kinaesthetic body. System X is a (...)
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  • Detecting the Identity Signature of Secret Social Groups: Holographic Processes and the Communication of Member Affiliation.Raymond Trevor Bradley - 2010 - World Futures 66 (2):124-162.
    The principles of classical and quantum holography are used to develop the theoretical basis for a non-phonemic method of detecting membership in secret social groups, such as cults, criminal gangs, drug cartels, and terrorist cells. Grounded in the basic sociological premise that every group develops a distinctive sociocultural order, the theory postulates that the primary features of a group's collective identity will be encoded, via a multilevel socio-psycho-physiological process, into the field of bio-emotional relations connecting group members. The principles of (...)
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  • Flashback: Reshuffling Emotions.Dana Sugu & Amita Chatterjee - 2010 - International Journal on Humanistic Ideology 3 (1):109-133.
    Abstract: Each affective state has distinct motor-expressions, sensory perceptions, autonomic, and cognitive patterns. Panksepp (1998) proposed seven neural affective systems of which the SEEKING system, a generalized approach-seeking system, motivates organisms to pursue resources needed for survival. When an organism is presented with a novel stimulus, the dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens septi (NAS) is released. The DA circuit outlines the generalized mesolimbic dopamine-centered SEEKING system and is especially responsive when there is an element of unpredictability in forthcoming rewards. (...)
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  • Précis of The Cognitive-Emotional Brain.Luiz Pessoa - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38:1-66.
  • Neurobiology of the Structure of Personality: Dopamine, Facilitation of Incentive Motivation, and Extraversion.Richard A. Depue & Paul F. Collins - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):491-517.
    Extraversion has two central characteristics: (1) interpersonalengagement, which consists of affiliation (enjoying and valuing close interpersonal bonds, being warm and affectionate) and agency (being socially dominant, enjoying leadership roles, being assertive, being exhibitionistic, and having a sense of potency in accomplishing goals) and (2) impulsivity, which emerges from the interaction of extraversion and a second, independent trait (constraint). Agency is a more general motivational disposition that includes dominance, ambition, mastery, efficacy, and achievement. Positive affect (a combination of positive feelings and (...)
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  • Consciousness, Classified and Declassified.Karl H. Pribram - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):590-592.
  • Brain-Behavioral Studies: The Importance of Staying Close to the Data.C. H. Vanderwolf & T. E. Robinson - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):497-514.
  • Behaviorism and Voluntarism.O. S. Vinogradova - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):496-497.
  • Independent Forebrain and Brainstem Controls for Arousal and Sleep.Jaime R. Villablanca - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):494-496.
  • An Atropine-Sensitive and a Less Atropine-Sensitive System.Robert P. Vertes - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):493-494.
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  • Where Does the Cholinergic Modulation of the EEG Take Place?J. C. Szerb & J. D. Dudar - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):493-493.
  • A Ghost in a Different Guise.R. J. Sutherland, I. Q. Whishaw & B. Kolb - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):492-492.
  • EEG Desynchronization is Associated with Cellular Events That Are Prerequisites for Active Behavioral States.M. Steriade - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):489-492.
  • Reticular Formation, Brain Waves, and Coma.George G. Somjen - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):489-489.
  • Neocortical Activation and Adaptive Behavior: Cholinergic Influences.P. Shiromani & William Fishbein - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):488-489.
  • Significance of Localized Rhythmic Activities Occurring During the Waking State.A. Rougeul, J. J. Bouyer & P. Buser - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):488-488.
  • An Obituary for Old Arousal Theory.James B. Ranck - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):487-488.
  • Acetylcholine, Amines, Peptides, and Cortical Arousal.J. W. Phillis - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):486-487.
  • Needed: More Data on the Reticular Information.Robert B. Malmo & Helen P. Malmo - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):485-486.
  • Cellular Mechanisms of Cholinergic Arousal.K. Krnjević - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):484-485.
  • Rhythmic Modulation of Sensorimotor Activity in Phase with EEG Waves.Barry R. Komisaruk & Kazue Semba - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):483-484.
  • Understanding the Physiological Correlates of a Behavioral State as a Constellation of Events.Barbara E. Jones - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):482-483.
  • EEG, Pharmacology, and Behavior.Herbert H. Jasper - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):482-482.
  • Is Hippocampal Theta an Artifact?Glynne Hirschman - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):480-482.
  • A Behaviorist in the Neurophysiology Lab.Howard Eichenbaum - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):480-480.
  • Is the Distinction Between Type I and Type II Behaviors Related to the Effects of Septal Lesions?Neil R. Carlson - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):479-479.
  • Can the Decomposition of Attention Clarify Some Clinical Issues?Enoch Callaway - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):477-479.
  • Behavioral Problems Related to the Interpretation of Brain Rhythms.György Buzsáki, Robert L. Isaacson & John H. Hannigan - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):477-477.
  • Is a Behaviorist's Approach Sufficient for Understanding the Brain?Thomas L. Bennett - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):476-477.
  • Reticulo-Cortical Activity and Behavior: A Critique of the Arousal Theory and a New Synthesis.C. H. Vanderwolf & T. E. Robinson - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):459-476.
    It is traditionally believed that cerebral activation (the presence of low voltage fast electrical activity in the neocortex and rhythmical slow activity in the hippocampus) is correlated with arousal, while deactivation (the presence of large amplitude irregular slow waves or spindles in both the neocortex and the hippocampus) is correlated with sleep or coma. However, since there are many exceptions, these generalizations have only limited validity. Activated patterns occur in normal sleep (active or paradoxical sleep) and during states of anesthesia (...)
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  • On Mapping Anxiety.Jeffrey A. Gray - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):506-534.
  • Leaping Up the Phylogenetic Scale in Explaining Anxiety: Perils and Possibilities.Marvin Zuckerman - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):505-506.
  • The Septo-Hippocampal System and Behavior: Difficulties in Finding the Exit.Michael L. Woodruff - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):504-504.
  • Substrates of Anxiety: But If the Starting Point is Wrong?Holger Ursin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):503-504.
  • Inferring Anxiety and Antianxiety Effects in Animals.Philippe Soubrié - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):502-503.
  • Does Hippocampal Theta Tell Us Anything About the Neuropsychology of Anxiety?Terry E. Robinson & Barbara A. Therrien - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):500-502.
  • Hypotheses of Neuroleptic Action: Levels of Progress.Roy A. Wise - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):78-87.
  • The Dynamics of Action and the Neuropsychology of Anxiety.William Revelle - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):499-499.
  • A Discriminating Case Against Anhedonia.T. N. Tombaugh - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):77-78.
  • The Relationship Between Memory and Anxiety.J. N. P. Rawlins - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):498-499.
  • Neuroleptic-Induced Anhedonia: Some Psychopharmacological Implications.Philippe Soubrie - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):76-77.
  • Attention, Dopamine, and Schizophrenia.Paul R. Solomon & Andrew Crider - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):75-76.
  • The Anatomy of Anxiety?Karl H. Pribram & Diane McGuinness - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):496-498.
  • The Reward-Effort Model: An Economic Framework for Examining the Mechanism of Neuroleptic Action.Harry M. Sinnamon - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):73-75.
  • Anxiety Viewed From the Upper Brain Stem: Though Panic and Fear Yield Trepidation, Should Both Be Called Anxiety?Jaak Panksepp - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):495-496.
  • Neurolepsis: Anhedonia or Blunting of Emotional Reactivity?Richard H. Rech - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):72-73.
  • The Pleasure in Brain Substrates of Foraging.Jaak Panksepp - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):71-72.
  • Functions of the Septo-Hippocampal System.David S. Olton - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):494-495.
  • The Anhedonia Hypothesis of Neuroleptic Drug Action: Basic and Clinical Considerations.Charles B. Nemeroff & Daniel Luttinger - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):70-71.