Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Diminishing Returns? Risk and the Duty to Care in the Sars Epidemic.Lynette Reid - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (4):348–361.
    The seriousness of the risk that healthcare workers faced during SARS, and their response of service in the face of this risk, brings to light unrealistic assumptions about duty and risk that informed the debate on duty to care in the early years of HIV/AIDS. Duty to care is not based upon particular virtues of the health professions, but arises from social reflection on what response to an epidemic would be consistent with our values and our needs, recognizing our shared (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • The Rationally Supererogatory.Claire Benn & Adam Bales - forthcoming - Mind:fzz055.
    The notion of supererogation—going above and beyond the call of duty—is typically discussed in a moral context. However, in this paper we argue for the existence of rationally supererogatory actions: that is, actions that go above and beyond the call of rational duty. In order to establish the existence of such actions, we first need to overcome the so-called paradox of supererogation: we need to provide some explanation for why, if some act is rationally optimal, it is not the case (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Supererogation, Optionality and Cost.Claire Benn - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (10):2399-2417.
    A familiar part of debates about supererogatory actions concerns the role that cost should play. Two camps have emerged: one claiming that extreme cost is a necessary condition for when an action is supererogatory, while the other denies that it should be part of our definition of supererogation. In this paper, I propose an alternative position. I argue that it is comparative cost that is central to the supererogatory and that it is needed to explain a feature that all accounts (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Qualified Account of Supererogation: Toward a Better Conceptualization of Corporate Social Responsibility.Antonio Tencati, Nicola Misani & Sandro Castaldo - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (2):250-272.
    ABSTRACTSome firms are initiating pro-stakeholder activities and policies that transcend conventional corporate social responsibility conceptions and seem inconsistent with their business interests or economic responsibilities. These initiatives, which are neither legally nor morally obligatory, are responding to calls for a more active role of business in society and for a broader interpretation of CSR. In fact, they benefit stakeholders in a superior and an innovative way and are difficult to reconcile with commonly used rationales in the extant CSR literature, such (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Epistemic Supererogation and its Implications.Trevor Hedberg - 2014 - Synthese 191 (15):3621-3637.
    Supererogatory acts, those which are praiseworthy but not obligatory, have become a significant topic in contemporary moral philosophy, primarily because morally supererogatory acts have proven difficult to reconcile with other important aspects of normative ethics. However, despite the similarities between ethics and epistemology, epistemic supererogation has received very little attention. In this paper, I aim to further the discussion of supererogation by arguing for the existence of epistemically supererogatory acts and considering the potential implications of their existence. First, I offer (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • On Why There is a Problem of Supererogation.Nora Grigore - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (4):1141-1163.
    How can it be that some acts of very high moral value are not morally required? This is the problem of supererogation. I do not argue in favor of a particular answer. Instead, I analyze two opposing moral intuitions the problem involves. First, that one should always do one’s best. Second, that sometimes we are morally allowed not to do our best. To think that one always has to do one’s best is less plausible, as it makes every morally best (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Praise, Blame, Obligation, and DWE: Toward a Framework for Classical Supererogation and Kin.Paul McNamara - 2011 - Journal of Applied Logic 9 (2):153-170.
    Continuing prior work by the author, a simple classical system for personal obligation is integrated with a fairly rich system for aretaic (agent-evaluative) appraisal. I then explore various relationships between definable aretaic statuses such as praiseworthiness and blameworthiness and deontic statuses such as obligatoriness and impermissibility. I focus on partitions of the normative statuses generated ("normative positions" but without explicit representation of agency). In addition to being able to model and explore fundamental questions in ethical theory about the connection between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Saints and Heroes: A Plea for the Supererogatory.Patricia M. McGoldrick - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (230):523 - 528.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Obligation, Supererogation and Self-Sacrifice.Russell A. Jacobs - 1987 - Philosophy 62 (239):96 - 101.
    Can an action cease to be required of a moral agent solely because it comes too costly ? Can self-sacrifice or risk of self-sacrifice serve as a limit on our moral obligations? Two recent articles in Philosophy , concerned primarily with the possibility of supererogatory action, suggest very different answers to these questions.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • A Plea for the Supererogatory: A Reply.Elizabeth M. Pybus - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (238):526 - 531.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Highlighting Moral Courage in the Business Ethics Course.Debra R. Comer & Michael Schwartz - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):703-723.
    At the end of their article in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of Business Ethics, Douglas R. May, Matthew T. Luth, and Catherine E. Schwoerer state that they are “hopeful in outlook” about the “evidence that business ethics instructors are….able to encourage students…to develop the courage to come forward even when pressures in organizations dictate otherwise”. We agree with May et al. that it is essential to augment students’ moral courage. However, it seems overly optimistic to believe that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation