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  1. Feminist History of Colonial Science.Londa Schiebinger - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):233-254.
    : This essay offers a short overview of feminist history of science and introduces a new project into that history, namely feminist history of colonial science. My case study focuses on eighteenth-century voyages of scientific discovery and reveals how gender relations in Europe and the colonies honed selective collecting practices. Cultural, economic, and political trends discouraged the transfer from the New World to the Old of abortifacients (widely used by Amerindian and African women in the West Indies).1.
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  • South American Fieldwork/Cytogenetic Knowledge: The Cytogenetic Research Program of Sally Hughes-Schrader and Franz Schrader.Marsha L. Richmond - 2020 - Perspectives on Science 28 (2):127-169.
    The marriage of Sally Peris Hughes and Franz Schrader in November 1920 launched a highly successful scientific collaboration that lasted over four decades. The Schraders were avid naturalists, adroit experimentalists, and keen theoreticians, and both had long, productive, and fruitful careers in zoology. They offer an extraordinarily rich case study that provides an insightful view of the work carried out in several areas of the life sciences from the 1920s to the 1960s—fieldwork, cytology, cytogenetics, and entomology—as well as critical aspects (...)
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  • Women and Partnership Genealogies in Drosophila Population Genetics.Marta Velasco Martín - 2020 - Perspectives on Science 28 (2):277-317.
    Drosophila flies began to be used in the study of species evolution during the late 1930s. The geneticists Natasha Sivertzeva-Dobzhansky and Elizabeth Reed pioneered this work in the United States, and María Monclús conducted similar studies in Spain. The research they carried out with their husbands enabled Drosophila population genetics to take off and reveals a genealogy of women geneticists grounded in mutual inspiration. Their work also shows that women were present in population genetics from the beginning, although their contributions (...)
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  • Feminist History of Colonial Science.Londa Schiebinger - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):233-254.
    This essay offers a short overview of feminist history of science and introduces a new project into that history, namely feminist history of colonial science. My case study focuses on eighteenth-century voyages of scientific discovery and reveals how gender relations in Europe and the colonies honed selective collecting practices. Cultural, economic, and political trends discouraged the transfer from the New World to the Old of abortifacients.1.
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  • Cécile Morette and the Les Houches Summer School for Theoretical Physics; or, How Girl Scouts, the 1944 Caen Bombing and a Marriage Proposal Helped Rebuild French Physics.Pierre Verschueren - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (4):595-616.
    The aftermath of the Second World War represented a major turning point in the history of French and European physical sciences. The physicist's profession was profoundly restructured, and in this transition the role of internationalism changed tremendously. Transnational circulation became a major part of research training. This article examines the conditions of possibility for this transformation, by focusing on the case of the summer school for theoretical physics created in 1951 by the young Cécile Morette, just in front of Mont (...)
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  • The Common World: Histories of Science and Domestic Intimacy.Deborah R. Coen - 2014 - Modern Intellectual History 11 (2):417-438.
    Let us begin by considering a series of letters written in 1863 by Max Vigne, a humble imperial surveyor in India, to his wife at home in England. In the course of his affectionate and finely observed correspondence, Vigne comes to think of himself for the first time as a naturalist. He recounts his growing fascination with botany, particularly the new field of plant geography, and he expresses a keen desire to share this new knowledge—and his newfound identity—with his faraway (...)
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  • Finding Science in Surprising Places: Gender and the Geography of Scientific Knowledge. Introduction to ‘Beyond the Academy: Histories of Gender and Knowledge’.Christine von Oertzen, Maria Rentetzi & Elizabeth S. Watkins - 2013 - Centaurus 55 (2):73-80.
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  • A Fractured Position in a Stable Partnership: Ebba Hult, Gerard De Geer, and Early Twentieth Century Swedish Geology.Staffan Bergwik - 2014 - Science in Context 27 (3):423-451.
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  • The Power of Partnerships: The Liverpool School of Butterfly and Medical Genetics.Doris T. Zallen - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Science 47 (4):677-699.
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  • The Making of Modern Scientific Personae: The Scientist as a Moral Person? Emil Du Bois-Reymond and His Friends.Irmline Veit-Brause - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):19-49.
    This article examines the notion of the `scientist as a moral person' in the light of the early stages of the commodification of science and the transformation of research into a big enterprise, operating on the principle of the division of labour. These processes were set in train at the end of the 19th century. The article focuses on the concomitant changes in the public persona and the habitus of scientific entrepreneurs. I begin by showing the significance of the professional (...)
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  • Innovative Niche Scientists: Women's Role in Reframing North American Museums, 1880-1930.Sally Gregory Kohlstedt - 2013 - Centaurus 55 (2):153-174.
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  • Molecular Biology and its Recent Historiography: A Transnational Quest for the 'Big Picture'.P. Abir-Am - 2006 - History of Science 44 (1):95-118.
  • Amateurs by Choice: Women and the Pursuit of Independent Scholarship in 20th Century Historical Writing.Gianna Pomata - 2013 - Centaurus 55 (2):196-219.
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