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  1. Mental Structures.Kevin J. Lande - 2020 - Noûs.
    An ongoing philosophical discussion concerns how various types of mental states fall within broad representational genera—for example, whether perceptual states are “iconic” or “sentential,” “analog” or “digital,” and so on. Here, I examine the grounds for making much more specific claims about how mental states are structured from constituent parts. For example, the state I am in when I perceive the shape of a mountain ridge may have as constituent parts my representations of the shapes of each peak and saddle (...)
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  • The “Book Problem” and its Neural Correlates.Phil Turner - 2014 - AI and Society 29 (4):497-505.
  • Computation and Cognition: Issues in the Foundation of Cognitive Science.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):111-32.
    The computational view of mind rests on certain intuitions regarding the fundamental similarity between computation and cognition. We examine some of these intuitions and suggest that they derive from the fact that computers and human organisms are both physical systems whose behavior is correctly described as being governed by rules acting on symbolic representations. Some of the implications of this view are discussed. It is suggested that a fundamental hypothesis of this approach is that there is a natural domain of (...)
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  • On the Demystification of Mental Imagery.Stephen M. Kosslyn, Steven Pinker, George E. Smith & Steven P. Shwartz - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):535-548.
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  • Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge.Arthur S. Reber - 1989 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 118 (3):219-235.
    I examine the phenomenon of implicit learning, the process by which knowledge about the rule-governed complexities of the stimulus environment is acquired independently of conscious attempts to do so. Our research with the two seemingly disparate experimental paradigms of synthetic grammar learning and probability learning, is reviewed and integrated with other approaches to the general problem of unconscious cognition. The conclusions reached are as follows: Implicit learning produces a tacit knowledge base that is abstract and representative of the structure of (...)
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  • Mental Imagery: In Search of a Theory.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):157-182.
    It is generally accepted that there is something special about reasoning by using mental images. The question of how it is special, however, has never been satisfactorily spelled out, despite more than thirty years of research in the post-behaviorist tradition. This article considers some of the general motivation for the assumption that entertaining mental images involves inspecting a picture-like object. It sets out a distinction between phenomena attributable to the nature of mind to what is called the cognitive architecture, and (...)
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  • S Eeingand Visualizing: I T' S N Otwhaty Ou T Hink.Zenon Pylyshyn - unknown
    6. Seeing With the Mind’s Eye 1: The Puzzle of Mental Imagery .................................................6-1 6.1 What is the puzzle about mental imagery?..............................................................................6-1 6.2 Content, form and substance of representations ......................................................................6-6 6.3 What is responsible for the pattern of results obtained in imagery studies?.................................6-8..
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  • The How, What, and Why of Mental Imagery.Stephen M. Kossyln, Steven Pinker, George E. Smith & Steven P. Shwartz - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):570-581.
  • On Spatial Symbols.William E. Smythe & Paul A. Kolers - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):568-569.
  • On the Function of Mental Imagery.David L. Waltz - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):569-570.
  • The Image-Like and the Language-Like.Benny Shanon - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):566-567.
  • Metaphor Versus Reality in the Understanding of Imagery: The Path From Function to Structure.Peter W. Sheehan - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):567-568.
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  • Al, Imagery, and Theories.Roger C. Schank - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):566-566.
  • On Demystifying the Mental for Psychology.Edward Sankowski - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):565-566.
  • The Demands of Mental Travel: Demand Characteristics of Mental Imagery Experiments.Charles L. Richman, David B. Mitchell & J. Steven Reznick - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):564-565.
  • Conscious and Nonconscious Imagery.Alan Richardson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):563-564.
  • Computational Versus Operational Approaches to Imagery.Allan Paivio - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):561-561.
  • Imagery Theory: Not Mysterious – Just Wrong.Zenon Pylyshyn - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):561-563.
  • The Imprecision of Mental Imagery.Thomas P. Moran - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):560-560.
  • Images, Models, and Human Nature.Ulric Neisser - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):561-561.
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  • A Conceptual, an Experimental, and a Modeling Question About Imagery Research.R. Duncan Luce - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):559-560.
  • The “Thoughtless Imagery” Controversy.P. N. Johnson-Laird - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):557-558.
  • The Imagery Debate: A Controversy Over Terms and Cognitive Styles.Janice M. Keenan & Richard K. Olson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):558-559.
  • Imagery Without Arrays.Geoffrey Hinton - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):555-556.
  • Mental Visualization in Nonlaboratory Situations.Ian M. L. Hunter - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):556-557.
  • Mental Imagery and Mystification.John Hell - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):554-555.
  • Understanding Mental Imagery: Interpretive Metaphors Versus Explanatory Models.Frederick Hayes-Roth - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):553-554.
  • Images, Memory, and Perception.Alastair Hannay - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):552-553.
  • So Many Models – So Little Time.Jerome A. Feldman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):551-552.
  • On Interpretative Processes in Imagery.Manuel de Vega - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):551-551.
  • Modeling the Mind's Eye.Lynn A. Cooper - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):550-551.
  • Neurologizing Mental Imagery: The Physiological Optics of the Mind's Eye.Bruce Bridgeman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):550-550.
  • Matters of Definition in the Demystification of Mental Imagery.John S. Antrobus - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):549-550.
  • Imagining the Purpose of Imagery.Robert P. Abelson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):548-549.
  • Cognitive Representation and the Process-Architecture Distinction.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):154-169.
  • Cognition is Not Computation, for the Reasons That Computers Don't Solve the Mind-Body Problems.Walter B. Weimer - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):152-153.
  • Functional Architectures for Cognition: Are Simple Inferences Possible?Steven W. Zucker - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):153-154.
  • Computation and Symbolization.William E. Smythe - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):151-152.
  • Computation Without Representation.Stephen P. Stich - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):152-152.
  • Functional Architecture and Model Validation.Martin Ringle - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):150-151.
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  • Pylyshyn and Perception.William T. Powers - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):148-149.
  • Penetrating the Impenetrable.Georges Rey - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):149-150.
  • Criteria of Cognitive Impenetrability.Robert C. Moore - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):146-147.
  • Explanations in Theories of Language and of Imagery.Steven Pinker - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):147-148.
  • Computation, Consciousness and Cognition.George A. Miller - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):146-146.
  • Cognitive Penetrability: Let Us Not Forget About Memory.James R. Miller - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):146-146.
  • Functional Architecture and Free Will.Henry E. Kyburg - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):143-146.
  • Reductionism and Cognitive Flexibility.Frank Keil - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):141-142.
  • The Elusive Visual Processing Mode: Implications of the Architecture/Algorithm Distinction.Roberta L. Klatzky - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):142-143.
  • The Reification of the Mind-Body Problem?Stewart H. Hulse - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):139-140.