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  1. Two Independent Value Orientations: Ideal and Counter-Ideal Leader Values and Their Impact on Followers' Respect for and Identification with Their Leaders. [REVIEW]Matthias M. Graf, Niels Van Quaquebeke & Rolf Van Dick - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):185-195.
    Traditionally, conceptualizations of human values are based on the assumption that individuals possess a single integrated value system comprising those values that people are attracted by and strive for. Recently, however, van Quaquebeke et al. (in J Bus Ethics 93:293–305, 2010 ) proposed that a value system might consist of two largely independent value orientations—an orientation of ideal values and an orientation of counter-ideal values (values that individuals are repelled by), and that both orientations exhibit antithetic effects on people’s responses (...)
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  • Perceived Ethical Leadership Affects Customer Purchasing Intentions Beyond Ethical Marketing in Advertising Due to Moral Identity Self-Congruence Concerns.Niels Van Quaquebeke, Jan U. Becker, Niko Goretzki & Christian Barrot - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (2):357-376.
    Ethical leadership has so far mainly been featured in the organizational behavior domain and, as such, treated as an intra-organizational phenomenon. The present study seeks to highlight the relevance of ethical leadership for extra-organizational phenomena by combining the organizational behavior perspective on ethical leadership with a classical marketing approach. In particular, we demonstrate that customers may use perceived ethical leadership cues as additional reference points when forming purchasing intentions. In two experimental studies, we find that ethical leadership positively affects purchasing (...)
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  • Ethical Leadership Evaluations After Moral Transgression: Social Distance Makes the Difference. [REVIEW]Andranik Tumasjan, Maria Strobel & Isabell Welpe - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (4):609 - 622.
    In light of continuing corporate scandals, the study of ethical leadership remains an important area of research which helps to understand the antecedents and consequences of ethical behavior in organizations. The present study investigates how social distance influences ethical leadership evaluations, and how in turn ethical leadership evaluations affect leader-member exchange (LMX) after a leader's moral transgression. Based on construal level theory, we propose that higher social distance will lead to more severe evaluations of immoral behavior and therefore entail lower (...)
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  • Does It Take More Than Ideals? How Counter-Ideal Value Congruence Shapes Employees’ Trust in the Organization.Sebastian C. Schuh, Niels Van Quaquebeke, Natalija Keck, Anja S. Göritz, David De Cremer & Katherine R. Xin - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (4):987-1003.
    Research on value congruence rests on the assumption that values denote desirable behaviors and ideals that employees and organizations strive to approach. In the present study, we develop and test the argument that a more complete understanding of value congruence can be achieved by considering a second type of congruence based on employees’ and organizations’ counter-ideal values. We examined this proposition in a time-lagged study of 672 employees from various occupational and organizational backgrounds. We used difference scores as well as (...)
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  • Business Executives' Perceptions of Ethical Leadership and Its Development.Catherine Marsh - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):565-582.
    This paper summarized the findings of a qualitative study that examines the perceptions of ethical leadership held by those who perceived themselves to be ethical leaders, and how life experiences shaped the values called upon when making ethical decisions. The experiences of 28 business executives were shared with the researcher, beginning with the recollection of a critical incident that detailed an ethical issue with which each executive had been involved. With the critical incident in mind, each executive told the personal (...)
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