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  1. IUGC, ROMBOS, Rhombus, Turbo.A. S. F. Gow - 1934 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 54 (1):1-13.
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  • P.Oxy. 4711 And The Poetry Of Parthenius.Hans Bernsdorff - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:1-.
    P.Oxy. 4711 (from a papyrus codex of the sixth century AD) contains elegiacs with at least three metamorphosis myths (Adonis, Asterie, Narcisssus). In this article I argue against the suggestion by (among others) the first editor of this papyrus that the verses might be by Parthenius. I do so by examining the evidence for Parthenian authorship (especially the presumed imitations by Ovid and Gregory of Nazianzus) and by comparing the style of the new piece with what we actually possess of (...)
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  • Callimachus' Second "Iamb" and its Predecessors: Framing the Box.Deborah Steiner - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:97-107.
    This article treats the figure of the fox that appears as one of the members of the embassy sent by the animal s to Zeus in Callimachus' second ¡ambo By exploring previous appearances of the fox in the poetic repertoire, I identify a series of Archaic and early Classical works that Callimachus uses by way of 'intertexts', and argue that the Hellenistic author draws on the animal's place within the interconnected iambic and fable traditions that inform his poem. Already visible (...)
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  • Framing the Fox: Callimachus' Second Iamb and its Predecessors.Deborah Steiner - 2010 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:97-107.
  • Sophocles at Patavium (Fr. 137 Radt).Matthew Leigh - 1998 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:82-100.
  • Ancient Knowledge of the Birds Now Known at Lake Stymphalus.J. J. Hall - 1982 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:235-236.
  • The Myth of the First Temples at Delphi.Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (2):231-251.
    The intriguing myth of the first temples at Delphi is first attested in Pindar's fragmentary eighth Paean. This text, and Pausanias 10.5.9–13, are the only two sources that actually tell the story of the first temples, while a few others simply mention, en passant, one or more-but not all-of these legendary temples, without setting out to give an account of the myth.
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  • The Wisdom of Thales and the Problem of the Word IEPOΣ.Michael Clarke - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (2):296-317.
    Those who write about early Greek literature often assume that each item in the ancient vocabulary answers to a single concept in the world-view of its users. It seems reasonable to hope that the body of ideas represented by a particular Greek word will frame one's discussion better than any question that could be asked in English: so that a cautious scholar might prefer to discuss the phenomenon called αδς, for example, than to plunge into a study of Greek ideas (...)
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  • Ovid, Met. 6.640: A Dialogue Between Mother and Son.Daniel Curley - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (1):320-322.
    In telling the story of Tereus, Procne, and Philomela, Ovid transformed tragedy—the Tereus of Sophocles1—into epic. The result was a narrative that followed the tragic plot but with a very different presentation. For example, Ovid incorporated into his episode events from the play's prologue, such as the marriage of Procne and Tereus, the birth of Itys, and the voyage of Tereus to Athens. In addition, he brought offstage action into the limelight, including the violation of Philomela, the slaughter of Itys, (...)
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  • The Serpent and the Sparrows: Homer and the Parodos of Aeschylus’ Agamemnon.John Heath - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (2):396-407.
    The Homeric influence on two prominent avian images in the parodos of the Agamemnon—the vulture simile and the omen of the eagles and the pregnant hare —has long been noted. In 1979 West suggested that the animal imagery also derived in part from Archilochus’ fable of the fox and the eagle, and his discussion was quickly welcomed and supplemented by Janko's reading of the eagle and snake imagery used by Orestes at Cho. 246–7. Capping this triennium mirabile of critical interest (...)
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  • Incubation Periods Throughout the Ages.Margaret Morse Nice - 1954 - Centaurus 3 (2):311-359.
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  • The Plow That Broke the Plain Epic Tradition: HesiodWorks and Days, Vv. 414–503.E. F. Beall - 2004 - Classical Antiquity 23 (1):1-31.
    This article presents a detailed study of an early section of the actual works and days of Hesiod's Works and Days. The treatment consistently eschews obsolete assumptions about this poem, in particular that it reduces to a didactic presentation to the early Greek farmer. A key principle of the method followed is to pay closer attention to the text's relation to epic forms than has been typical among the poem's commentators. The result is to find that a certain literary figure (...)
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