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  1. The Moral Bioenhancement of Psychopaths.Elvio Baccarini & Luca Malatesti - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):697-701.
    We argue that the mandatory moral bioenhancement of psychopaths is justified as a prescription of social morality. Moral bioenhancement is legitimate when it is justified on the basis of the reasons of the recipients. Psychopaths expect and prefer that the agents with whom they interact do not have certain psychopathic traits. Particularly, they have reasons to require the moral bioenhancement of psychopaths with whom they must cooperate. By adopting a public reason and a Kantian argument, we conclude that we can (...)
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  • Should Moral Bioenhancement Be Compulsory? Reply to Vojin Rakic.I. Persson & J. Savulescu - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):251-252.
    In his challenging paper,1 Vojin Rakic argues against our claim that ‘there are strong reasons to believe’ that moral bioenhancement should be obligatory or compulsory if it can be made safe and effective.2 Rakic starts by criticising an argument that we employed against John Harris.3 ,4 In this argument we maintain, among other things, that moral bioenhancement cannot be wholly effective if our will is free in what is called an ‘indeterministic’ or ‘contra-causal sense’; that is, if our choices are (...)
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  • We Must Create Beings with Moral Standing Superior to Our Own.Vojin Rakić - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (1):58-65.
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  • The Art of Misunderstanding Critics.Michael Hauskeller - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):153-161.
  • Is It Desirable to Be Able to Do the Undesirable? Moral Bioenhancement and the Little Alex Problem.Michael Hauskeller - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):365-376.
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  • Are We Obliged to Enhance for Moral Perfection?Alfred Archer - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (5):490-505.
    Suppose, we could take a pill that would turn us into morally better people. Would we have a duty to take such a pill? In recent years, a number of philosophers have discussed this issue. Most prominently, Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu have argued that we would have a duty to take such a pill. In this article, I wish to investigate the possible limits of a duty to take moral enhancement drugs through investigating the related question of whether it (...)
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  • Why “Moral Enhancement” Isn’T Always Moral Enhancement: The Case of Traumatic Brain Injury in American Vets.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (5):527-546.
    In this article, I argue that as we learn more about how we might intervene in the brain in ways that impact human behavior, the scope of what counts as “moral behavior” becomes smaller and smaller because things we successfully manipulate using evidence-based science are often things that fall outside the sphere of morality. Consequently, the argument that we are morally obligated to morally enhance our neighbors starts to fall apart, not because humans should be free to make terrible choices, (...)
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  • Imagining Moral Bioenhancement Practices: Drawing Inspiration From Moral Education, Public Health Ethics, and Forensic Psychiatry.Jona Specker & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):415-426.
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  • The Tragedy of Biomedical Moral Enhancement.Stefan Schlag - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (1):5-17.
    In Unfit for the Future, Ingmar Persson and Julian Savulescu present a challenging argument in favour of biomedical moral enhancement. In light of the existential threats of climate change, insufficient moral capacities of the human species seem to require a cautiously shaped programme of biomedical moral enhancement. The story of the tragedy of the commons creates the impression that climate catastrophe is unavoidable and consequently gives strength to the argument. The present paper analyses to what extent a policy in favour (...)
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  • Putting a Price on Empathy: Against Incentivising Moral Enhancement.Sarah Carter - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (10):825-829.
    Concerns that people would be disinclined to voluntarily undergo moral enhancement have led to suggestions that an incentivised programme should be introduced to encourage participation. This paper argues that, while such measures do not necessarily result in coercion or undue inducement (issues with which one may typically associate the use of incentives in general), the use of incentives for this purpose may present a taboo tradeoff. This is due to empirical research suggesting that those characteristics likely to be affected by (...)
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  • The Issues of Freedom and Happiness in Moral Bioenhancement: Continuing the Debate With a Reply to Harris Wiseman.Vojin Rakić - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):469-474.
    During the previous years, Harris Wiseman has devoted substantial attention to my stance on voluntary moral bioenhancement. He argued that he has been influenced by that position, but nonetheless criticized it. I haven’t replied to his criticisms yet and wish to do so now. One of the reasons is to avoid my position being misrepresented. By replying to Wiseman’s criticisms, I also wish to clarify those issues in my standpoint that might have given rise to some of the misinterpretations. With (...)
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  • We Can Make Room for SSRIs.Vojin Rakić - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (3):34-35.
  • Imagining Moral Bioenhancement Practices: Drawing Inspiration From Moral Education, Public Health Ethics, and Forensic Psychiatry.Jona Specker & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):415-426.
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  • Voluntary Moral Bioenhancement Is a Solution to Sparrow's Concerns.Vojin Rakić - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (4):37-38.
  • Incentivized Goodness.Vojin Rakić - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (3):303-309.
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  • Genome Editing for Involuntary Moral Enhancement.Vojin Rakić - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (1):46-54.
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  • Lone Wolf Terrorists and the Impotence of Moral Enhancement.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83:271-291.
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  • The Sins of Moral Enhancement Discourse.Harris Wiseman - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 83:35-58.
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  • Would We Even Know Moral Bioenhancement If We Saw It?Harris Wiseman - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):398-410.
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  • Is It Desirable to Be Able to Do the Undesirable? Moral Bioenhancement and the Little Alex Problem.Michael Hauskeller - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):365-376.
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  • Moral Bioenhancement and Free Will: Continuing the Debate.Vojin Rakić - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (3):384-393.
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  • SSRIs and Moral Enhancement: Looking Deeper.Harris Wiseman - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (4):W1-W7.
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  • SSRIs as Moral Enhancement Interventions: A Practical Dead End.Harris Wiseman - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (3):21-30.
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  • Egalitarianism and Successful Moral Bioenhancement.Alan T. Wilson - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (4):35-36.
    Robert Sparrow (2014) argues that moral bioenhancement - the project of attempting to improving moral character via medical or biological means - ought to be of great concern to egalitarians. Importantly, Sparrow's argument is meant to apply regardless of whether such bioenhancement is likely to be successful. In this response, I argue against Sparrow's worries concerning successful moral bioenhancement. This response highlights that it may not be possible to separate moral questions of the permissibility of bioenhancement from scientific and conceptual (...)
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  • Compulsory Administration of Oxytocin Does Not Result in Genuine Moral Enhancement.Vojin Rakić - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):291-297.
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  • What to Enhance: Behaviour, Emotion or Disposition?Karim Jebari - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (3):253-261.
    As we learn more about the human brain, novel biotechnological means to modulate human behaviour and emotional dispositions become possible. These technologies could be used to enhance our morality. Moral bioenhancement, an instance of human enhancement, alters a person’s dispositions, emotions or behaviour in order to make that person more moral. I will argue that moral bioenhancement could be carried out in three different ways. The first strategy, well known from science fiction, is behavioural enhancement. The second strategy, favoured by (...)
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