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Adam Smith

Philosophical Review 96 (4):612-615 (1987)

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  1. Adam Smith's Invisible Hand Argument.John D. Bishop - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (3):165 - 180.
    Adam Smith is usually thought to argue that the result of everyone pursuing their own interests will be the maximization of the interests of society. The invisible hand of the free market will transform the individual''s pursuit of gain into the general utility of society. This is the invisible hand argument.Many people, although Smith did not, draw a moral corollary from this argument, and use it to defend the moral acceptability of pursuing one''s own self-interest.
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  • Some Remarks on Criminology and Moral Philosophy.Jonathan Jacobs - 2019 - Criminal Justice Ethics 38 (3):198-220.
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  • The Invisible Hand of Natural Selection, and Vice Versa.Toni Vogel Carey - 1998 - Biology and Philosophy 13 (3):427-442.
    Building on work by Popper, Schweber, Nozick, Sober, and others in a still-growing literature, I explore here the conceptual kinship between Adam Smith''s ''invisible hand'' and Darwinian natural selection. I review the historical ties, and examine Ullman -Margalit''s ''constraints'' on invisible-hand accounts, which I later re-apply to natural selection, bringing home the close relationship. These theories share a ''parent'' principle, itself neither biological no politico-economic, that collective order and well-being can emerge parsimoniously from the dispersed action of individuals. The invisible (...)
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  • The smithian sympathy as a way to reduce the aporophobia derived from corruption.Pablo Ayala Enríquez - 2018 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 41:69-86.
    Resumen Los escándalos de corrupción dados a conocer durante los últimos tres años en Latinoamérica, además de reflejar el modo en que la corrupción mueve los engranajes de las instituciones y organizaciones empresariales, pueden considerarse como uno de los principales detonantes de la aporofobia y ceguera moral que aqueja a nuestras sociedades. Teniendo en consideración los resortes que activan ambos fenómenos, el presente artículo explora las posibilidades que tiene la simpatía smithiana para desactivarlos, así como el aporte social de ésta (...)
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  • Knowledge, Communication and the Scottish Enlightenment.Sheila Dow - 2009 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 10 (2):3.
  • Beyond Self-Interest and Altruism: A Reconstruction of Adam Smith's Theory of Human Conduct: Elias L. Khalil.Elias L. Khalil - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (2):255-273.
    I attempt a reconstruction of Adam Smith's view of human nature as explicated in The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Smith's view of human conduct is neither functionalist nor reductionist, but interactionist. The moral autonomy of the individual, conscience, is neither made a function of public approval nor reduced to self-contained impulses of altruism and egoism. Smith does not see human conduct as a blend of independently defined impulses. Rather, conduct is unified, by the underpinning sentiment of sympathy.
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  • Adam Smith as Globalization Theorist.Fonna Forman‐Barzilai - 2000 - Critical Review 14 (4):391-419.
    In the Theory of Moral Sentiments, Adam Smith observed that we live in a fundamentally conflictual world. Although he held that we are creatures who sympathize, he also observed that our sympathy seems to be constrained by geographical limits. Accordingly, traditional theories of cosmopolitanism were implausible; yet, as a moral philosopher, Smith attempted to reconcile his bleak description of the world with his eagerness for international peace. Smith believed that commercial intercourse among self?interested nations would emulate sympathy on a global (...)
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  • Empathy and Imagination.Nancy Sherman - 1998 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):82-119.
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  • Adam Smith, Ethicist.Christina McRorie - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (4):674-696.
    This essay argues that Adam Smith's political economy is premised upon a moral anthropology, and that greater attention to Smith from religious ethicists may both improve Smith scholarship and deepen dialogue on economic themes within the field of religious ethics. It does so first by surveying common readings of Smith and noting that engagement of his work within religious ethics and theology tends to rely on misconceptions prevalent in these readings. It then outlines the moral psychology that links Smith's Theory (...)
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  • "Sympathetic Exchange," Adam Smith, and Punishment.Eric Miller - 1996 - Ratio Juris 9 (2):182-197.
  • Contract or Coincidence: George Herbert Mead and Adam Smith on Self and Society.Timothy M. Costelloe - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):81-109.
    Although a number of commentators have remarked upon the simi larities between aspects of George Herbert Mead's social psychology and Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments, there has been no sys tematic attempt to document the connection. This article attempts to do precisely that. First, the legitimacy of the connection is established by showing the likelihood that Mead knew this particular work by Smith, and by bringing together the various treatments of the matter made by commentators. Since Mead himself does (...)
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