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  1. Using Reinforcement Learning to Examine Dynamic Attention Allocation During Reading.Yanping Liu, Erik D. Reichle & Ding-Guo Gao - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (8):1507-1540.
    A fundamental question in reading research concerns whether attention is allocated strictly serially, supporting lexical processing of one word at a time, or in parallel, supporting concurrent lexical processing of two or more words (Reichle, Liversedge, Pollatsek, & Rayner, 2009). The origins of this debate are reviewed. We then report three simulations to address this question using artificial reading agents (Liu & Reichle, 2010; Reichle & Laurent, 2006) that learn to dynamically allocate attention to 1–4 words to “read” as efficiently (...)
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  • Conceptual, Experimental, and Theoretical Indeterminacies in Research on Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification.Daniel Holender - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):50-66.
  • A Review of the Literature with and Without Awareness. [REVIEW]George Wolford - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):49-50.
  • Facilitation or Inhibition From Parafoveal Words?Geoffrey Underwood - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):48-49.
  • Priming Without Awareness: What Was All the Fuss About?Keith E. Stanovich & Dean G. Purcell - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):47-48.
  • Against Semantic Preprocessing in Parafoveal Vision.Keith Rayner - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):46-47.
  • The Pilfering of Awareness and Guilt by Association.Kenneth R. Paap - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):45-46.
  • Processing of the Unattended Message During Selective Dichotic Listening.R. Näätänen - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):43-44.
  • What Do You Mean by Conscious?John Morton - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):43-43.
  • Consciousness is a “Subjective” State.Philip M. Merikle & Jim Cheesman - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):42-42.
  • Semantic Activation and Reading.George W. McConkie - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):41-42.
  • Consciousness and Processing: Choosing and Testing a Null Hypothesis.Anthony J. Marcel - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):40-41.
  • The Psychophysics of Subliminal Perception.Neil A. Macmillan - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):38-39.
  • Conscious Identification: Where Do You Draw the Line?Stephen J. Lupker - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):37-38.
  • Approaches to Consciousness: Psychophysics or Philosophy?Richard Latto & John Campion - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):36-37.
  • Semantic Activation, Consciousness, and Attention.William A. Johnston - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):35-36.
  • Attentional Orienting Precedes Conscious Identification.Albrecht Werner Inhoff - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):35-35.
  • An Operational Definition of Conscious Awareness Must Be Responsible to Subjective Experience.Carol A. Fowler - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):33-35.
  • Knowing and Knowing You Know: Better Methods or Better Models?Ira Fischler - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):32-33.
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  • Identification, Masking, and Priming: Clarifying the Issues.Lindsay J. Evett, Glyn W. Humphreys & Philip T. Quinlan - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):31-32.
  • Experimental Indeterminacies in the Dissociation Paradigm of Subliminal Perception.Matthew Hugh Erdelyi - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):30-31.
  • On Private Events and Brain Events.Norman F. Dixon - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):29-30.
  • A History of Subliminal Perception in Autobiography.Robert G. Crowder - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):28-29.
  • Electrodermal Responses to Words in an Irrelevant Message: A Partial Reappraisal.Raymond S. Corteen - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):27-28.
  • Now You See It, Now You Don't: Relations Between Semantic Activation and Awareness.Thomas H. Carr & Dale Dagenbach - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):26-27.
  • Theories of Visual Masking.Bruce Bridgeman - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):25-26.
  • Through the Looking-Glass and What Cognitive Psychology Found There.Edoardo Bisiach - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):24-25.
  • Unconscious Semantic Processing: The Pendulum Keeps on Swinging.David A. Balota - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):23-24.
  • Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification in Dichotic Listening, Parafoveal Vision, and Visual Masking: A Survey and Appraisal.Daniel Holender - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):1-23.
    When the stored representation of the meaning of a stimulus is accessed through the processing of a sensory input it is maintained in an activated state for a certain amount of time that allows for further processing. This semantic activation is generally accompanied by conscious identification, which can be demonstrated by the ability of a person to perform discriminations on the basis of the meaning of the stimulus. The idea that a sensory input can give rise to semantic activation without (...)
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  • Using Reinforcement Learning to Understand the Emergence of "Intelligent" Eye-Movement Behavior During Reading.Erik D. Reichle & Patryk A. Laurent - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (2):390-408.
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  • An Analysis of the Time Course of Lexical Processing During Reading.Heather Sheridan & Erik D. Reichle - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (3):522-553.
    Reingold, Reichle, Glaholt, and Sheridan reported a gaze-contingent eye-movement experiment in which survival-curve analyses were used to examine the effects of word frequency, the availability of parafoveal preview, and initial fixation location on the time course of lexical processing. The key results of these analyses suggest that lexical processing begins very rapidly and is supported by substantial parafoveal processing. Because it is not immediately obvious that these results are congruent with the theoretical assumption that words are processed and identified in (...)
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