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  1. Manipulation of Information in Medical Research: Can It Be Morally Justified?Sapfo Lignou & Sarah Jl Edwards - 2012 - Research Ethics 8 (1):9-23.
    The aim of this article is to examine whether informational manipulation, used intentionally by the researcher to increase recruitment in the research study, can be morally acceptable. We argue that this question is better answered by following a non-normative account, according to which the ethical justifiability of informational manipulation should not be relevant to its definition. The most appropriate criterion by which informational manipulation should be considered as morally acceptable or not is the researcher’s special moral duties towards their subjects. (...)
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  • Mind the Child: Using Interactive Technology to Improve Child Involvement in Decision Making About Life-Limiting Illness.Raymond C. Barfield, Debra Brandon, Julie Thompson, Nichol Harris, Michael Schmidt & Sharron Docherty - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):28 – 30.
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  • Different Context, Similar Motives: External Influences on Motivation.Aisha Y. Malik - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (11):26-28.
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  • When Is It Ethical for Physician-Investigators to Seek Consent From Their Own Patients?Stephanie R. Morain, Steven Joffe & Emily A. Largent - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (4):11-18.
    Classic statements of research ethics advise against permitting physician-investigators to obtain consent for research participation from patients with whom they have preexisting treatment relationships. Reluctance about “dual-role” consent reflects the view that distinct normative commitments govern physician–patient and investigator–participant relationships, and that blurring the research–care boundary could lead to ethical transgressions. However, several features of contemporary research demand reconsideration of the ethics of dual-role consent. Here, we examine three arguments advanced against dual-role consent: that it creates role conflict for the (...)
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  • Recruiting Children for Clinical Trials: Lessons From Pediatric Oncology.Liza-Marie Johnson & Yoram Unguru - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (11):24-26.
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