Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. A Good Enough Reason: Addiction, Agency and Criminal Responsibility.Stephen J. Morse - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (5):490 - 518.
    ABSTRACT The article begins by contrasting medical and moral views of addiction and how such views influence responsibility and policy analysis. It suggests that since addiction always involves action and action can always be morally evaluated, we must independently decide whether addicts do not meet responsibility criteria rather than begging the question and deciding by the label of ?disease? or ?moral weakness?. It then turns to the criteria for criminal responsibility and shows that the criteria for criminal responsibility, like the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Denial in Addiction.Hanna Pickard - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (3):277-299.
    I argue that denial plays a central but insufficiently recognized role in addiction. The puzzle inherent in addiction is why drug use persists despite negative consequences. The orthodox conception of addiction resolves this puzzle by appeal to compulsion; but there is increasing evidence that addicts are not compelled to use but retain choice and control over their consumption in many circumstances. Denial offers an alternative explanation: there is no puzzle as to why drug use persists despite negative consequences if these (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Mechanisms for Robust Cognition.Matthew M. Walsh & Kevin A. Gluck - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1131-1171.
    To function well in an unpredictable environment using unreliable components, a system must have a high degree of robustness. Robustness is fundamental to biological systems and is an objective in the design of engineered systems such as airplane engines and buildings. Cognitive systems, like biological and engineered systems, exist within variable environments. This raises the question, how do cognitive systems achieve similarly high degrees of robustness? The aim of this study was to identify a set of mechanisms that enhance robustness (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Evolving Resolve.Walter Veit & David Spurrett - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    The broad spectrum revolution brought greater dependence on skill and knowledge, and more demanding, often social, choices. We adopt Sterelny's account of how cooperative foraging paid the costs associated with longer dependency, and transformed the problem of skill learning. Scaffolded learning can facilitate cognitive control including suppression, whereas scaffolded exchange and trade, including inter-temporal exchange, can help develop resolve.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Reinforcement Learning: A Brief Guide for Philosophers of Mind.Julia Haas - manuscript
    I argue for the role of reinforcement learning in the philosophy of mind. To start, I make several assumptions about the nature of reinforcement learning and its instantiation in minds like ours. I then review some of the contributions of reinforcement learning methods have made across the so-called 'decision sciences.' Finally, I show how principles from reinforcement learning can shape philosophical debates regarding the nature of perception and characterisations of desire.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Addiction: Choice or Compulsion?Edmund Henden, Hans Olav Melberg & Ole Rogeberg - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychiatry 4 (77):11.
    Normative thinking about addiction has traditionally been divided between, on the one hand, a medical model which sees addiction as a disease characterized by compulsive and relapsing drug use over which the addict has little or no control and, on the other, a moral model which sees addiction as a choice characterized by voluntary behaviour under the control of the addict. Proponents of the former appeal to evidence showing that regular consumption of drugs causes persistent changes in the brain structures (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Is “Willpower” a Scientific Concept? Suppressing Temptation Contra Resolution in the Face of Adversity.Elias L. Khalil - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    The distinction that Ainslie draws among the triple-phenomena “suppression,” “resolve,” and “habit” is a great advance in decision making theory. But the conceptual machinery “willpower,” and its underpinning distinction between small/soon rewards as opposed to large/later rewards, provides a faulty framework to understand the triple-phenomena.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Processing Speed Enhances Model-Based Over Model-Free Reinforcement Learning in the Presence of High Working Memory Functioning.Daniel J. Schad, Elisabeth Jã¼Nger, Miriam Sebold, Maria Garbusow, Nadine Bernhardt, Amir-Homayoun Javadi, Ulrich S. Zimmermann, Michael N. Smolka, Andreas Heinz, Michael A. Rapp & Quentin J. M. Huys - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Taking an Engineer's View: Implications of Network Analysis for Computational Psychiatry.A. David Redish, Rebecca Kazinka & Alexander B. Herman - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On the Biomedicalization of Alcoholism.Ron Berghmans, Johan de Jong, Aad Tibben & Guido de Wert - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (4):311-321.
    The shift in the prevailing view of alcoholism from a moral paradigm towards a biomedical paradigm is often characterized as a form of biomedicalization. We will examine and critique three reasons offered for the claim that viewing alcoholism as a disease is morally problematic. The first is that the new conceptualization of alcoholism as a chronic brain disease will lead to individualization, e.g., a too narrow focus on the individual person, excluding cultural and social dimensions of alcoholism. The second claim (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Addiction-as-a-Kind Hypothesis.Petri Ylikoski & Samuli Pöyhönen - 2015 - International Journal of Addiction and Drug Research 4 (1):21-25.
    The psychiatric category of addiction has recently been broadened to include new behaviors. This has prompted critical discussion about the value of a concept that covers so many different substances and activities. Many of the debates surrounding the notion of addiction stem from different views concerning what kind of a thing addiction fundamentally is. In this essay, we put forward an account that conceptualizes different addictions as sharing a cluster of relevant properties (the syndrome) that is supported by a matrix (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Computational Psychiatry.P. Read Montague, Raymond J. Dolan, Karl J. Friston & Peter Dayan - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):72-80.
  • Institutions, Distributed Cognition and Agency: Rule-Following as Performative Action.Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):21-42.
    Aoki recently proposed the concept of substantive institutions, a concept that relates the outcomes of strategic interaction with public representations of the equilibrium states of games. I argue that the Aoki model can be grounded in theories of distributed cognition and performativity, which I put into the context of Searle's philosophical account of institutions. Substantive institutions build on regularized causal interactions between internal neuronal mechanisms and external facts, shared in a population of agents. Following Searle's proposal of conceiving rule-following as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • From Dual Systems to Dual Function: Rethinking Methodological Foundations of Behavioural Economics.Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2019 - Economics and Philosophy 35 (3):403-422.
    Building on an overview of dual systems theories in behavioural economics, the paper presents a methodological assessment in terms of the mechanistic explanations framework that has gained prominence in philosophy of the neurosciences. I conclude that they fail to meet the standards of causal explanations and I suggest an alternative ‘dual functions’ view based on Marr’s methodology of computational neuroscience. Recent psychological and neuroscience research undermines the case for a categorization of brain processes in terms of properties such as relative (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Constitutive Explanations in Neuroeconomics: Principles and a Case Study on Money.Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (4):374-395.
    So far, the methodological debate about neuroeconomics rarely refers to original methodological positions in the neurosciences. I confront one of the most influential ones, the constitutive explanations or mechanism approach, with methodological claims that directly relate the economic model of choice with neuronal embodiments, represented by Glimcher’s influential work. Constitutive explanations are composite and non-reductionist, therefore allow for recognizing complex causal interactions between basal neuronal phenomena and cognitive structures, also involving external symbolic media. I demonstrate the power of this methodology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Motivated Explanation.Richard Patterson, Joachim T. Operskalski & Aron K. Barbey - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Addictive Actions.Edmund Henden - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):362-382.
    It is common to think of addiction as involving behavior which in some sense is ?out of control.? But does this mean addictive actions occur because of compulsion or because of ordinary weakness of will? Many philosophers argue that addictive actions occur because of weakness of will, since there is plenty of evidence suggesting that they are not caused by irresistible desires. In fact, addicts seem, in general, to perform these actions freely in the sense of having the ability to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Drugs as Instruments: A New Framework for Non-Addictive Psychoactive Drug Use.Christian P. Müller & Gunter Schumann - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):293-310.
    Most people who are regular consumers of psychoactive drugs are not drug addicts, nor will they ever become addicts. In neurobiological theories, non-addictive drug consumption is acknowledged only as a prerequisite for addiction, but not as a stable and widespread behavior in its own right. This target article proposes a new neurobiological framework theory for non-addictive psychoactive drug consumption, introducing the concept of Psychoactive drugs are consumed for their effects on mental states. Humans are able to learn that mental states (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • How the Neuroscience of Decision Making Informs Our Conception of Autonomy.Gidon Felsen & Peter B. Reiner - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (3):3-14.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations