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  1. Source-Goal Asymmetries in Motion Representation: Implications for Language Production and Comprehension.Anna Papafragou - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (6):1064-1092.
    Recent research has demonstrated an asymmetry between the origins and endpoints of motion events, with preferential attention given to endpoints rather than beginnings of motion in both language and memory. Two experiments explore this asymmetry further and test its implications for language production and comprehension. Experiment 1 shows that both adults and 4-year-old children detect fewer within-category changes in source than goal objects when tested for memory of motion events; furthermore, these groups produce fewer references to source than goal objects (...)
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  • Keeping the Result in Sight and Mind: General Cognitive Principles and Language‐Specific Influences in the Perception and Memory of Resultative Events.Maria Sakarias & Monique Flecken - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (1):e12708.
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  • Movement Choremes: Bridging Cognitive Understanding and Formal Characterizations of Movement Patterns1.Alexander Klippel - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):722-740.
    This article discusses an approach to characterizing movement patterns (paths/trajectories) of individual agents that allows for relating aspects of cognitive conceptualization of movement patterns with formal spatial characterizations. To this end, we adopt a perspective of characterizing movement patterns on the basis of perceptual and conceptual invariants that we term movement choremes (MCs). MCs are formally grounded by behaviorally validating qualitative spatio-temporal calculi. Relating perceptual and cognitive aspects of space and formal theories of spatial information has shown promise to foster (...)
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  • What Does Children's Spatial Language Reveal About Spatial Concepts? Evidence From the Use of Containment Expressions.Megan Johanson & Anna Papafragou - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (5):881-910.
    Children's overextensions of spatial language are often taken to reveal spatial biases. However, it is unclear whether extension patterns should be attributed to children's overly general spatial concepts or to a narrower notion of conceptual similarity allowing metaphor-like extensions. We describe a previously unnoticed extension of spatial expressions and use a novel method to determine its origins. English- and Greek-speaking 4- and 5-year-olds used containment expressions (e.g., English into, Greek mesa) for events where an object moved into another object but (...)
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  • Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers.Panos Athanasopoulos & Emanuel Bylund - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (2):286-309.
    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based triads matching with and without verbal interference. Results showed between-group differences in verbal descriptions and in memory-based triads matching. However, no differences were found in online triads matching and in memory-based triads (...)
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  • The Amelia Bedelia Effect: World Knowledge and the Goal Bias in Language Acquisition.Mahesh Srinivasan & David Barner - 2013 - Cognition 128 (3):431-450.
  • Language and Memory for Motion Events: Origins of the Asymmetry Between Source and Goal Paths.Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (3):517-544.
    When people describe motion events, their path expressions are biased toward inclusion of goal paths (e.g., into the house) and omission of source paths (e.g., out of the house). In this paper, we explored whether this asymmetry has its origins in people’s non-linguistic representations of events. In three experiments, 4-year-old children and adults described or remembered manner of motion events that represented animate/intentional and physical events. The results suggest that the linguistic asymmetry between goals and sources is not fully rooted (...)
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  • Standing Up to the Canoe: Competing Cognitive Biases in the Encoding of Stative Spatial Relations in a Language with a Single Spatial Preposition.Åshild Næss - 2018 - Cognitive Linguistics 29 (4):807-841.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
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  • Giving and Taking: Representational Building Blocks of Active Resource-Transfer Events in Human Infants.Denis Tatone, Alessandra Geraci & Gergely Csibra - 2015 - Cognition 137:47-62.
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  • What Gestures Reveal About How Semantic Distinctions Develop in Dutch Children's Placement Verbs.Marianne Gullberg & Bhuvana Narasimhan - 2010 - Cognitive Linguistics 21 (2).