Switch to: References

Citations of:

Philosophic Foundations of Quantum Mechanics

Dover Publications (1944)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Physics, Inconsistency, and Quasi-Truth.Newton C. A. Da Costa & Décio Krause - 2014 - Synthese 191 (13):3041-3055.
    In this work, the first of a series, we study the nature of informal inconsistency in physics, focusing mainly on the foundations of quantum theory, and appealing to the concept of quasi-truth. We defend a pluralistic view of the philosophy of science, grounded on the existence of inconsistencies and on quasi-truth. Here, we treat only the ‘classical aspects’ of the subject, leaving for a forthcoming paper the ‘non-classical’ part.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Are There Any a Priori Constraints on the Study of Rationality?L. Jonathan Cohen - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):359.
  • Cohen on Contraposition.N. E. Wetherick - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):358.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Inferential Competence: Right You Are, If You Think You Are.Stephen P. Stich - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):353.
  • Rationality is a Necessary Presupposition in Psychology.Jan Smedslund - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):352.
  • Conditional Probability, Taxicabs, and Martingales.Brian Skyrms - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):351.
  • Human Rationality: Misleading Linguistic Analogies.Geoffrey Sampson - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):350.
  • Lay Arbitration of Rules of Inference.Richard E. Nisbett - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):349.
  • Propensity, Evidence, and Diagnosis.J. L. Mackie - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):345.
  • The Irrational, the Unreasonable, and the Wrong.Avishai Margalit & Maya Bar-Hillel - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):346.
  • “Is” and “Ought” in Cognitive Science.William G. Lycan - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):344.
  • Should Bayesians Sometimes Neglect Base Rates?Isaac Levi - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):342.
  • Intuition, Competence, and Performance.Henry E. Kyburg - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):341.
  • Improvements in Human Reasoning and an Error in L. J. Cohen's.David H. Krantz - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):340.
  • Human Reasoning: Can We Judge Before We Understand?Richard A. Griggs - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):338.
  • Can Children's Irrationality Be Experimentally Demonstrated?Sam Glucksberg - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):337.
  • Rationality and the Sanctity of Competence.Hillel J. Einhorn & Robin M. Hogarth - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):334.
  • Rational Animal?Simon Blackburn - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):331.
  • Independent Forebrain and Brainstem Controls for Arousal and Sleep.Jaime R. Villablanca - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):494.
  • Report on Recent Developments in the Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics.Henry Margenau & John Compton - 1949 - Synthese 8 (1):260 - 271.
  • Non-Monotonic Probability Theory and Photon Polarization.Fred Kronz - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (4):449-472.
    A non-monotonic theory of probability is put forward and shown to have applicability in the quantum domain. It is obtained simply by replacing Kolmogorov's positivity axiom, which places the lower bound for probabilities at zero, with an axiom that reduces that lower bound to minus one. Kolmogorov's theory of probability is monotonic, meaning that the probability of A is less then or equal to that of B whenever A entails B. The new theory violates monotonicity, as its name suggests; yet, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Causal Anomalies and the Completeness of Quantum Theory.Roger Jones - 1977 - Synthese 35 (1):41 - 78.
  • Causal-Relevance Explanation: Salmon's Theory and its Relation to Reichenbach.Edwin Levy - 1982 - Synthese 50 (3):423 - 445.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Competence, Performance, and Ignorance.Robert W. Weisberg - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):356-358.
  • Performing Competently.Lola L. Lopes - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):343-344.
  • On the Complementarity of the Quadrature Observables.Pekka Lahti & Juha-Pekka Pellonpää - 2010 - Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1419-1428.
    In this paper we investigate the coupling properties of pairs of quadrature observables, showing that, apart from the Weyl relation, they share the same coupling properties as the position-momentum pair. In particular, they are complementary. We determine the marginal observables of a covariant phase space observable with respect to an arbitrary rotated reference frame, and observe that these marginal observables are unsharp quadrature observables. The related distributions constitute the Radon transform of a phase space distribution of the covariant phase space (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Importance of Cognitive Illusions.Peter Wason - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):356-356.
  • Compact Quantum Systems and the Pauli Data Problem.A. J. Bracken & R. J. B. Fawcett - 1993 - Foundations of Physics 23 (2):277-289.
    Compact quantum systems have underlying compact kinematical Lie algebras, in contrast to familiar noncompact quantum systems built on the Weyl-Heisenberg algebra. Pauli asked in the latter case: to what extent does knowledge of the probability distributions in coordinate and momentum space determine the state vector? The analogous question for compact quantum systems is raised, and some preliminary results are obtained.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Theoretical Apparatus of Semantic Realism: A New Language for Classical and Quantum Physics. [REVIEW]Claudio Garola & Luigi Solombrino - 1996 - Foundations of Physics 26 (9):1121-1164.
    The standard interpretation of quantum physics (QP) and some recent generalizations of this theory rest on the adoption of a rerificationist theory of truth and meaning, while most proposals for modifying and interpreting QP in a “realistic” way attribute an ontological status to theoretical physical entities (ontological realism). Both terms of this dichotomy are criticizable, and many quantum paradoxes can be attributed to it. We discuss a new viewpoint in this paper (semantic realism, or briefly SR), which applies both to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • 'Coordinative Definition' and Reichenbach's Semantic Framework: A Reassessment.Lionel Stefan Shapiro - 1994 - Erkenntnis 41 (3):287 - 323.
    Reichenbach's Philosophy of Space and Time (1928) avoids most of the logical positivist pitfalls it is generally held to exemplify, notably both conventionalism and verificationism. To see why, we must appreciate that Reichenbach's interest lies in how mathematical structures can be used to describe reality, not in how words like 'distance' acquire meaning. Examination of his proposed "coordinative definition" of congruence shows that Reichenbach advocates a reductionist analysis of the relations figuring in physical geometry (contrary to common readings that attribute (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Critique of the Disturbance Theory of Indeterminacy in Quantum Mechanics.Harvey R. Brown & Michael L. G. Redhead - 1981 - Foundations of Physics 11 (1-2):1-20.
    Heisenberg'sgendanken experiments in quantum mechanics have given rise to a widespread belief that the indeterminacy relations holding for the variables of a quantal system can be explained quasiclassically in terms of a disturbance suffered by the system in interaction with a quantal measurement, or state preparation, agent. There are a number of criticisms of this doctrine in the literature, which are critically examined in this article and found to be ininconclusive, the chief error being the conflation of this disturbance with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Complementarity in Quantum Mechanics: A Logical Analysis.Hugo Bedau & Paul Oppenheim - 1961 - Synthese 13 (3):201 - 232.
  • Some Questions Regarding the Rationality of a Demonstration of Human Rationality.Robert J. Sternberg - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):352-353.
  • The Philosophy of Hans Reichenbach.Wesley C. Salmon - 1977 - Synthese 34 (1):5 - 88.
  • Quantum Mechanics and Classical Probability Theory.Joseph D. Sneed - 1970 - Synthese 21 (1):34 - 64.
  • On Defining Rationality Unreasonably.J. St B. T. Evans & P. Pollard - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):335-336.
  • La logique interne de la théorie des probabilités.Yvon Gauthier - 1993 - Dialogue 32 (1):95-.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Nonlocal Quantum Information Transfer Without Superluminal Signalling and Communication.Jan Walleczek & Gerhard Grössing - 2016 - Foundations of Physics 46 (9):1208-1228.
    It is a frequent assumption that—via superluminal information transfers—superluminal signals capable of enabling communication are necessarily exchanged in any quantum theory that posits hidden superluminal influences. However, does the presence of hidden superluminal influences automatically imply superluminal signalling and communication? The non-signalling theorem mediates the apparent conflict between quantum mechanics and the theory of special relativity. However, as a ‘no-go’ theorem there exist two opposing interpretations of the non-signalling constraint: foundational and operational. Concerning Bell’s theorem, we argue that Bell employed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reichenbach and Conventionalism.Laurent A. Beauregard - 1977 - Synthese 34 (3):265 - 280.
  • Putnam on Realism, Reference and Truth: The Problem with Quantum Mechanics.Christopher Norris - 2001 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):65 – 91.
    In this essay, I offer a critical evaluation of Hilary Putnam's writings on epistemology and philosophy of science, in particular his engagement with interpretative problems in quantum mechanics. I trace the development of his thinking from the late 1960s when he adopted a strong causal-realist position on issues of meaning, reference, and truth, via the "internal realist" approach of his middle-period writings, to the various forms of pragmatist, naturalized, or "commonsense" epistemology proposed in his latest books. My contention is that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Persistence of Cognitive Illusions.Persi Diaconis & David Freedman - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):333-334.
  • The Absolutist Theory of Omnipotence.Nick Trakakis - 1997 - Sophia 36 (2):55-78.
  • Idealization and Factualization in Science.Władysław Krajewski - 1977 - Erkenntnis 11 (1):323 - 339.
    This paper considers the method of idealization and factualization as the main method of all advanced empirical science. The procedure is as follows. Some idealizing conditions are assumed: the vanishing of factors $(p_{i}=0)$ which never vanish in the real world. An idealization law is formulated -- a law which is exactly (non-vacuously) fulfilled only in an ideal model, not in any real system. Then the idealizing assumptions are abrogated one by one-it is a process of gradual factualization, of the transition (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Status of the Rationality Assumption in Psychology.Marvin S. Cohen - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):332-333.
  • Unphilosophical Probability.Sandy L. Zabell - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):358-359.
  • Rules of Probability in Quantum Mechanics.Leon Cohen - 1988 - Foundations of Physics 18 (10):983-998.
    We show that the quantum mechanical rules for manipulating probabilities follow naturally from standard probability theory. We do this by generalizing a result of Khinchin regarding characteristic functions. From standard probability theory we obtain the methods usually associated with quantum theory; that is, the operator method, eigenvalues, the Born rule, and the fact that only the eigenvalues of the operator have nonzero probability. We discuss the general question as to why quantum mechanics seemingly necessitates different methods than standard probability theory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Can Any Statements About Human Behavior Be Empirically Validated?Baruch Fischoff - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):336-337.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Why the Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles is Not Contingently True Either.Steven French - 1989 - Synthese 78 (2):141 - 166.
    Faced with strong arguments to the effect that Leibniz''sPrinciple of the Identity of Indiscernibles (PII) is not a necessary truth, many supporters of the Principle have staged a strategic retreat to the claim that it is contingently true in this, the actual, world. The purpose of this paper is to examine the status of the various forms of PII in both classical and quantum physics, and it is concluded that this latter view is at best doubtful, at worst, simply wrong.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Determination of the Past and the Future of a Physical System in Quantum Mechanics.Paul Busch & Pekka J. Lahti - 1989 - Foundations of Physics 19 (6):633-678.
    The determination of the past and the future of a physical system are complementary aims of measurements. An optimal determination of the past of a system can be achieved by an informationally complete set of physical quantities. Such a set is always strongly noncommutative. An optimal determination of the future of a physical system can be obtained by a Boolean complete set of quantities. The two aims can be reconciled to a reasonable degree with using unsharp measurements.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Non-Separability Does Not Relieve the Problem of Bell's Theorem.Joe Henson - 2013 - Foundations of Physics 43 (8):1008-1038.
    This paper addresses arguments that “separability” is an assumption of Bell’s theorem, and that abandoning this assumption in our interpretation of quantum mechanics (a position sometimes referred to as “holism”) will allow us to restore a satisfying locality principle. Separability here means that all events associated to the union of some set of disjoint regions are combinations of events associated to each region taken separately.In this article, it is shown that: (a) localised events can be consistently defined without implying separability; (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations