Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. To Trust or Not to Trust? Children’s Social Epistemology.Fabrice Clément - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (4):531-549.
    Philosophers agree that an important part of our knowledge is acquired via testimony. One of the main objectives of social epistemology is therefore to specify the conditions under which a hearer is justified in accepting a proposition stated by a source. Non-reductionists, who think that testimony could be considered as an a priori source of knowledge, as well as reductionists, who think that another type of justification has to be added to testimony, share a common conception about children development. Non-reductionists (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Memory and Self-Consciousness: Immunity to Error Through Misidentification.Andy Hamilton - 2009 - Synthese 171 (3):409-417.
    In The Blue Book, Wittgenstein defined a category of uses of “I” which he termed “I”-as-subject, contrasting them with “I”-as-object uses. The hallmark of this category is immunity to error through misidentification (IEM). This article extends Wittgenstein’s characterisation to the case of memory-judgments, discusses the significance of IEM for self-consciousness—developing the idea that having a first-person thought involves thinking about oneself in a distinctive way in which one cannot think of anyone or anything else—and refutes a common objection to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Ontogenesis of Trust.Fabrice Clement, Melissa Koenig & Paul Harris - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (4):360-379.
    Psychologists have emphasized children's acquisition of information through firsthand observation. However, many beliefs are acquired from others' testimony. In two experiments, most 4yearolds displayed sceptical trust in testimony. Having heard informants' accurate or inaccurate testimony, they anticipated that informants would continue to display such differential accuracy and they trusted the hitherto reliable informant. Yet they ignored the testimony of the reliable informant if it conflicted with what they themselves had seen. By contrast, threeyearolds were less selective in trusting a reliable (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Are Envy, Anger, and Resentment Moral Emotions?Aaron Ben-Ze'ev - 2002 - Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):148 – 154.
    The moral status of emotions has recently become the focus of various philosophical investigations. Certain emotions that have traditionally been considered as negative, such as envy, jealousy, pleasure-in-others'-misfortune, and pride, have been defended. Some traditionally "negative" emotions have even been declared to be moral emotions. In this brief paper, I suggest two basic criteria according to which an emotion might be considered moral, and I then examine whether envy, anger, and resentment are moral emotions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Testimony, Simulation, and the Limits of Inductivism.Patrick Rysiew - 2000 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (2):269 – 274.
  • How to Reid Moore.John Greco - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (209):544-563.
    Moore's 'Proof of an External World' has evoked a variety of responses from philosophers, including bafflement, indignation and sympathetic reconstruction. I argue that Moore should be understood as following Thomas Reid on a variety of points, both epistemological and methodological. Moreover, Moore and Reid are exactly right on all of these points. Hence what I present is a defence of Moore's 'Proof', as well as an interpretation. Finally, I argue that the Reid-Moore position is useful for resolving an issue that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • Tesitmony as Significance Negotiation.F. Epp Jennifer - unknown
    This dissertation addresses the following questions: How should epistemologists conceptualize testimony? What do people use testimony to do? And why does ‘what people do’ with testimony matter epistemically? In response to these questions I both define and characterize testimony. While doing so I argue for the following answers, given here very briefly: What do people do when they testify? They tell each other things and avow that those things are true, offering their statements to others as reasons to believe. More (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Testimony, Induction and Folk Psychology.Jack Lyons - 1997 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (2):163 – 178.
    This paper responds to CAJ Coady's arguments against a reductionist view about testimony.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • The Intentional and Social Nature of Human Emotions: Reconsideration of the Distinction Between Basic and Non‐Basic Emotions.Aaron Ben‐ze'ev & Keith Oatley - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (1):81-94.
  • Did Reid's Metaphilosophy Survive Kant, Hamilton, and Mill?Edward H. Madden - 1987 - Metaphilosophy 18 (1):31–48.
  • Husserls Begriff der Kinästhese Und Seine Entwicklung.Christian Ferencz-Flatz - 2014 - Husserl Studies 30 (1):21-45.
    EinleitungDer Begriff Kinästhese ist in der Husserl-Literatur durchaus geläufig. Trotzdem fehlt bis heute eine umfassende Erörterung seiner Bedeutung und seiner Spielformen sowie auch seiner konkreten Entwicklungsgeschichte bei Husserl.Zu erwähnen wären in dieser Hinsicht besonders: Claesges (1964), Claesges’ „Einleitung des Herausgebers“ zu Hua XVI, Drummond (1984), Melle (1983), S. 114–120, Piedade (2001), Przybylski (2006) und Mattens (2009). Vermutlich würde fast jeder Husserl-Kenner – wenn danach fragt – ohne weiteres antworten, Kinästhesen seien jene Bewegungsmöglichkeiten des leiblichen Subjekts, durch die sich seine Wahrnehmungsgegenstände (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • What Kind of Philosopher Was Locke on Mind and Body?Han-Kyul Kim - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):180-207.
    The wide range of conflicting interpretations that exist in regard to Locke's philosophy of mind and body (i.e. dualistic, materialist, idealistic) can be explained by the general failure of commentators to appreciate the full extent of his nominalism. Although his nominalism that focuses on specific natural kinds has been much discussed, his mind-body nominalism remains largely neglected. This neglect, I shall argue, has given rise to the current diversity of interpretations. This paper offers a solution to this interpretative puzzle, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What Kind of Philosopher Was Locke on Mind and Body?K. I. M. Han-kyul - 2010 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):180-207.
    The wide range of conflicting interpretations that exist in regard to Locke's philosophy of mind and body (i.e. dualistic, materialist, idealistic) can be explained by the general failure of commentators to appreciate the full extent of his nominalism. Although his nominalism that focuses on specific natural kinds has been much discussed, his mind-body nominalism remains largely neglected. This neglect, I shall argue, has given rise to the current diversity of interpretations. This paper offers a solution to this interpretative puzzle, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Beyond Words: Communication, Truthfulness, and Understanding.Patrick Rysiew - 2007 - Episteme 4 (3):285-304.
    Testimony is an indispensable source of information. Yet, contrary to ‘literalism’, speakers rarely mean just what they say; and even when they do, that itself is something the hearer needs to realize. So, understanding instances of testimony requires more than merely reading others' messages off of the words they utter. Further, a very familiar and theoretically well-entrenched approach to how we arrive at such understanding serves to emphasize, not merely how deeply committed we are to testimony as a reliable source (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations