Switch to: References

Citations of:

Practical Reasoning About Final Ends

Cambridge University Press (1994)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. A New Direction for Science and Values.Daniel J. Hicks - 2014 - Synthese 191 (14):3271-95.
    The controversy over the old ideal of “value-free science” has cooled significantly over the past decade. Many philosophers of science now agree that even ethical and political values may play a substantial role in all aspects of scientific inquiry. Consequently, in the last few years, work in science and values has become more specific: Which values may influence science, and in which ways? Or, how do we distinguish illegitimate from illegitimate kinds of influence? In this paper, I argue that this (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Theoretical and Practical Reason in Economics: Capacities and Capabilities. [REVIEW]Thomas R. Wells - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (2):202-207.
    (2014). Theoretical and practical reason in economics: capacities and capabilities. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 202-207. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2014.910937.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Empirical Ethics, Context-Sensitivity, and Contextualism.Albert Musschenga - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (5):467 – 490.
    In medical ethics, business ethics, and some branches of political philosophy (multi-culturalism, issues of just allocation, and equitable distribution) the literature increasingly combines insights from ethics and the social sciences. Some authors in medical ethics even speak of a new phase in the history of ethics, hailing "empirical ethics" as a logical next step in the development of practical ethics after the turn to "applied ethics." The name empirical ethics is ill-chosen because of its associations with "descriptive ethics." Unlike descriptive (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  • Computational Representation of Practical Argument.Katie Atkinson, Trevor Bench-Capon & Peter McBurney - 2006 - Synthese 152 (2):157-206.
    In this paper we consider persuasion in the context of practical reasoning, and discuss the problems associated with construing reasoning about actions in a manner similar to reasoning about beliefs. We propose a perspective on practical reasoning as presumptive justification of a course of action, along with critical questions of this justification, building on the account of Walton. From this perspective, we articulate an interaction protocol, which we call PARMA, for dialogues over proposed actions based on this theory. We outline (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Engineering and the Problem of Moral Overload.Jeroen Van den Hoven, Gert-Jan Lokhorst & Ibo Van de Poel - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):143-155.
    When thinking about ethics, technology is often only mentioned as the source of our problems, not as a potential solution to our moral dilemmas. When thinking about technology, ethics is often only mentioned as a constraint on developments, not as a source and spring of innovation. In this paper, we argue that ethics can be the source of technological development rather than just a constraint and technological progress can create moral progress rather than just moral problems. We show this by (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Ethical Frameworks in Public Health Decision-Making: Defending a Value-Based and Pluralist Approach.Kalle Grill & Angus Dawson - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (4):291-307.
    A number of ethical frameworks have been proposed to support decision-making in public health and the evaluation of public health policy and practice. This is encouraging, since ethical considerations are of paramount importance in health policy. However, these frameworks have various deficiencies, in part because they incorporate substantial ethical positions. In this article, we discuss and criticise a framework developed by James Childress and Ruth Bernheim, which we consider to be the state of the art in the field. Their framework (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Paths of Judgement: The Revival of Practical Wisdom.Richard Smith - 1999 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (3):327–340.
  • ‘Practical Comparability’ and Ends in Economics.Ricardo F. Crespo - 2007 - Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):371-393.
    This paper endeavours to summarize a variety of arguments for a reconsideration of ends in Economics. The logical structure of the rationality of ends (practical rationality) differs from the one of means (instrumental rationality). The paper sets out to explain the differences between both rationalities and some of the implications of incorporating this new emphasis on ends, given that Economics adopts the means rationality. The emergence of the topics of incommensurability and incomparability of ends is presented and a possible way (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Legal Justification by Optimal Coherence.Amalia Amaya - 2011 - Ratio Juris 24 (3):304-329.
    This paper examines the concept of coherence and its role in legal reasoning. First, it identifies some problem areas confronting coherence theories of legal reasoning about both disputed questions of fact and disputed questions of law. Second, with a view to solving these problems, it proposes a coherence model of legal reasoning. The main tenet of this coherence model is that a belief about the law and the facts under dispute is justified if it is “optimally coherent,” that is, if (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Epistemic Democracy and the Social Character of Knowledge.Michael Fuerstein - 2008 - Episteme 5 (1):pp. 74-93.
    How can democratic governments be relied upon to achieve adequate political knowledge when they turn over their authority to those of no epistemic distinction whatsoever? This deep and longstanding concern is one that any proponent of epistemic conceptions of democracy must take seriously. While Condorcetian responses have recently attracted substantial interest, they are largely undermined by a fundamental neglect of agenda-setting. I argue that the apparent intractability of the problem of epistemic adequacy in democracy stems in large part from a (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • ‘The Economic’ According to Aristotle: Ethical, Political and Epistemological Implications. [REVIEW]Ricardo Crespo - 2008 - Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):281-294.
    A renewed concern with Aristotle’s thought about the economic aspects of human life and society can be observed. Aristotle dealt with the economic issues in his practical philosophy. He thus considered ‘the economic’ within an ethical and political frame. This vision is coherent with a specific ontology of ‘the economic’ according to Aristotle. In a recent paper, I analysed this ontology and left its consequences, especially for Ethics and Politics, for another paper. In this article, I firstly summarise the reasoning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethical Coherence.Paul Thagard - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (4):405 – 422.
    This paper explores the ethical relevance of a precise new characterization of coherence as maximization of satisfaction of positive and negative constraints. A coherence problem can be stated by specifying a set of elements to be accepted or rejected along with sets of positive and negative constraints that incline pairs of elements to be accepted together or rejected together. Computationally tractable and psychologically plausible algorithms are available for determining the acceptance and rejection of elements in a way that reliably approximates (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Justice for Hedgehogs, Conceptual Authenticity for Foxes: Ronald Dworkin on Value Conflicts.Jack Winter - 2016 - Res Publica 22 (4):463-479.
    In his 2011 book Justice for Hedgehogs, Ronald Dworkin makes a case for the view that genuine values cannot conflict and, moreover, that they are necessarily mutually supportive. I argue that by prioritizing coherence over the conceptual authenticity of values, Dworkin’s ‘interpretivist’ view risks neglecting what we care about in these values. I first determine Dworkin’s position on the monism/pluralism debate and identify the scope of his argument, arguing that despite his self-declared monism, he is in fact a pluralist, but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Beyond the Classroom Wall: Theorist-Practitioner Relationships and Extra-Mural Ethics. [REVIEW]Alan Cribb - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (4):383-396.
  • Intuition and the Junctures of Judgment in Decision Procedures for Clinical Ethics.John K. Davis - 2007 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (1):1-30.
    Moral decision procedures such as principlism or casuistry require intuition at certain junctures, as when a principle seems indeterminate, or principles conflict, or we wonder which paradigm case is most relevantly similar to the instant case. However, intuitions are widely thought to lack epistemic justification, and many ethicists urge that such decision procedures dispense with intuition in favor of forms of reasoning that provide discursive justification. I argue that discursive justification does not eliminate or minimize the need for intuition, or (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Structuring Ends.Jon Garthoff - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (4):691-713.
    There is disagreement among contemporary theorists regarding human well-being. On one hand there are “substantive good” views, according to which the most important elements of a person’s well-being result from her nature as a human, rational, and/or sentient being. On the other hand there are “agent-constituted” views, which contend that a person’s well-being is constituted by her particular aims, desires, and/or preferences. Each approach captures important features of human well-being, but neither can provide a complete account: agent-constituted theories have difficulty (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • It's Good to Talk: Deliberative Institutions for Environmental Policy.Jonathan Aldred - 2002 - Philosophy and Geography 5 (2):133 – 152.
    Most applications of cost-benefit analysis in environmental policy, and almost all the controversial cases, involve the use of contingent valuation (CV) surveys. There is now a relatively well-developed critique of CV as a method of public consultation on environmental issues. Theories of deliberative democracy have been invoked which question the individualistic, preference-based calculus of CV. A particular deliberative institution which has recently received much attention is the citizens' jury (CJ). While CJs and other deliberative institutions have come to be regarded (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Easy Cases and Value Incommensurability.Stephen R. Grimm - 2007 - Ratio 20 (1):26–44.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Understanding Alien Morals.Gopal Sreenivasan - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):1-32.
    Anthropologists often claim to have understood an ethical outlook that they nevertheless believe is largely false. Some moral philosophers---e.g., Susan Hurley---argue that this claim is incoherent because understanding an ethical outlook necessarily involves believing it to be largely true. To reach this conclusion, they apply an argument of Donald Davidson’s to the ethical case. My central aim is to defend the coherence of the anthropologists’ claim against this argument.To begin with, I specify a candidate-language that contains a significant number of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations