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  1. Beyond Perceptual Symbols: A Call for Representational Pluralism.Guy Dove - 2009 - Cognition 110 (3):412-431.
    Recent evidence from cognitive neuroscience suggests that certain cognitive processes employ perceptual representations. Inspired by this evidence, a few researchers have proposed that cognition is inherently perceptual. They have developed an innovative theoretical approach that rests on the notion of perceptual simulation and marshaled several general arguments supporting the centrality of perceptual representations to concepts. In this article, I identify a number of weaknesses in these arguments and defend a multiple semantic code approach that posits both perceptual and non-perceptual representations.
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  • Three Symbol Ungrounding Problems: Abstract Concepts and the Future of Embodied Cognition.Guy Dove - 2016 - Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 4 (23):1109-1121.
    A great deal of research has focused on the question of whether or not concepts are embodied as a rule. Supporters of embodiment have pointed to studies that implicate affective and sensorimotor systems in cognitive tasks, while critics of embodiment have offered nonembodied explanations of these results and pointed to studies that implicate amodal systems. Abstract concepts have tended to be viewed as an important test case in this polemical debate. This essay argues that we need to move beyond a (...)
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  • Language-Guided Visual Processing Affects Reasoning: The Role of Referential and Spatial Anchoring.Magda L. Dumitru, Gitte H. Joergensen, Alice G. Cruickshank & Gerry T. M. Altmann - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):562-571.
    Language is more than a source of information for accessing higher-order conceptual knowledge. Indeed, language may determine how people perceive and interpret visual stimuli. Visual processing in linguistic contexts, for instance, mirrors language processing and happens incrementally, rather than through variously-oriented fixations over a particular scene. The consequences of this atypical visual processing are yet to be determined. Here, we investigated the integration of visual and linguistic input during a reasoning task. Participants listened to sentences containing conjunctions or disjunctions and (...)
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  • Embodied Language Comprehension: Encoding-Based and Goal-Driven Processes.Renske S. Hoedemaker & Peter C. Gordon - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):914-929.
  • Seeing, Acting, Understanding: Motor Resonance in Language Comprehension.Rolf A. Zwaan & Lawrence J. Taylor - 2006 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 135 (1):1-11.
  • Assessing the Causal Structure of Function.Sergio E. Chaigneau, Lawrence W. Barsalou & Steven A. Sloman - 2004 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 133 (4):601-625.
  • Spatial Distance Effects on Incremental Semantic Interpretation of Abstract Sentences: Evidence From Eye Tracking.Ernesto Guerra & Pia Knoeferle - 2014 - Cognition 133 (3):535-552.
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  • The Motion Behind the Symbols: A Vital Role for Dynamism in the Conceptualization of Limits and Continuity in Expert Mathematics.Tyler Marghetis & Rafael Núñez - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (2):299-316.
    The canonical history of mathematics suggests that the late 19th-century “arithmetization” of calculus marked a shift away from spatial-dynamic intuitions, grounding concepts in static, rigorous definitions. Instead, we argue that mathematicians, both historically and currently, rely on dynamic conceptualizations of mathematical concepts like continuity, limits, and functions. In this article, we present two studies of the role of dynamic conceptual systems in expert proof. The first is an analysis of co-speech gesture produced by mathematics graduate students while proving a theorem, (...)
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  • Curb Your Embodiment.Diane Pecher - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (3):501-517.
    To explain how abstract concepts are grounded in sensory-motor experiences, several theories have been proposed. I will discuss two of these proposals, Conceptual Metaphor Theory and Situated Cognition, and argue why they do not fully explain grounding. A central idea in Conceptual Metaphor Theory is that image schemas ground abstract concepts in concrete experiences. Image schemas might themselves be abstractions, however, and therefore do not solve the grounding problem. Moreover, image schemas are too simple to explain the full richness of (...)
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  • Action Verbs Are Processed Differently in Metaphorical and Literal Sentences Depending on the Semantic Match of Visual Primes.Melissa Troyer, Lauren B. Curley, Luke E. Miller, Ayse P. Saygin & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • An Enactivist Account of Abstract Words: Lessons From Merleau-Ponty.Brian A. Irwin - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):133-153.
    Enactivist accounts of language use generally treat concrete words in terms of motor intentionality systems and affordances for action. There is less consensus, though, regarding how abstract words are to be understood in enactivist terms. I draw on Merleau-Ponty’s later philosophy to argue, against the representationalist paradigm that has dominated the cognitive scientific and philosophical traditions, that language is fundamentally a mode of participation in our world. In particular, language orients us within our milieus in a manner that extends into (...)
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  • On the Birth and Growth of Concepts.Jean M. Mandler - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):207 – 230.
    This article describes what the earliest concepts are like and presents a theory of the spatial primitives from which they are formed. The earliest concepts tend to be global, like animal and container, and it is hypothesized that they consist of simplified redescriptions of innately salient spatial information. These redescriptions become associated with sensory and other bodily experiences that are not themselves redescribed, but that enrich conceptual thought. The initial conceptual base becomes expanded through subdivision, sometimes aided by language that (...)
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  • Images Schemas in Conceptual Development: What Happened to the Body?Raymond W. Gibbs - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):231-239.
    Mandler's target article claims that infants' capacity to abstract certain kinds of information from perceptual ldisplays occurs through a special mechanism of ?perceptual meaning analysis?, which generates abstract, ?image-schemas? that are analogical representations summarizing spatial relations and movement in space. Under this view, perceptual processes give input to forming conceptual representations, but higher-order concepts are disembodied, symbolic representations that are stripped of their embodied roots. My alternative argument is that bodily experience has an enduring role in early conceptual development, and (...)
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  • Logical Connectives Modulate Attention to Simulations Evoked by the Constituents They Link Together.Magda L. Dumitru & Gitte H. Joergensen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Neural Reuse: A Fundamental Organizational Principle of the Brain.Michael L. Anderson - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):245.
    An emerging class of theories concerning the functional structure of the brain takes the reuse of neural circuitry for various cognitive purposes to be a central organizational principle. According to these theories, it is quite common for neural circuits established for one purpose to be exapted (exploited, recycled, redeployed) during evolution or normal development, and be put to different uses, often without losing their original functions. Neural reuse theories thus differ from the usual understanding of the role of neural plasticity (...)
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  • Number-Induced Shifts in Spatial Attention: A Replication Study.Kiki Zanolie & Diane Pecher - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Simulating an Enactment Effect: Pronouns Guide Action Simulation During Narrative Comprehension.Tali Ditman, Tad T. Brunyé, Caroline R. Mahoney & Holly A. Taylor - 2010 - Cognition 115 (1):172-178.
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  • The Integration of Figurative Language and Static Depictions: An Eye Movement Study of Fictive Motion.Daniel Richardson & Teenie Matlock - 2007 - Cognition 102 (1):129-138.
  • Embodied Communication: Speakers’ Gestures Affect Listeners’ Actions.Michael K. Tanenhaus Susan Wagner Cook - 2009 - Cognition 113 (1):98.
  • Perception and Presupposition in Real-Time Language Comprehension: Insights From Anticipatory Processing.Craig G. Chambers & Valerie San Juan - 2008 - Cognition 108 (1):26-50.
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  • Spatial Representations Elicit Dual‐Coding Effects in Mental Imagery.Michelle Verges & Sean Duffy - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (6):1157-1172.
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  • Moving Words: Dynamic Representations in Language Comprehension.Rolf A. Zwaan, Carol J. Madden, Richard H. Yaxley & Mark E. Aveyard - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (4):611-619.
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  • Putting Motor Resonance in Perspective.Sandra C. Lozano, Bridgette Martin Hard & Barbara Tversky - 2008 - Cognition 106 (3):1195-1220.
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  • The Fabric of Thought: Priming Tactile Properties During Reading Influences Direct Tactile Perception.Tad T. Brunyé, Eliza K. Walters, Tali Ditman, Stephanie A. Gagnon, Caroline R. Mahoney & Holly A. Taylor - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (8):1449-1467.
    The present studies examined whether implied tactile properties during language comprehension influence subsequent direct tactile perception, and the specificity of any such effects. Participants read sentences that implicitly conveyed information regarding tactile properties (e.g., Grace tried on a pair of thick corduroy pants while shopping) that were either related or unrelated to fabrics and varied in implied texture (smooth, medium, rough). After reading each sentence, participants then performed an unrelated rating task during which they felt and rated the texture of (...)
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  • Real and Imagined Body Movement Primes Metaphor Comprehension.Nicole L. Wilson & Raymond W. Gibbs - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (4):721-731.
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  • The Action–Sentence Compatibility Effect: It's All in the Timing.Kristin L. Borreggine & Michael P. Kaschak - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (6):1097-1112.
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  • Infant Concepts Revisited.Jean M. Mandler - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):269 – 280.
    In this paper I answer some concerns of the commentators on my article 'On the birth and growth of concepts'. I explain that my theory of concept formation in infancy emphasizes spatial information over bodily information but still allows the body to influence conceptual thought. I suggest that bodily feelings may be represented differently from spatial information. I do not claim that spatial image-schemas account for all conceptual thought, but I show why they are sufficient for the relatively limited conceptual (...)
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  • Semantic Interference and Facilitation: Understanding the Integration of Spatial Distance and Conceptual Similarity During Sentence Reading.Ernesto Guerra & Pia Knoeferle - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Representing Object Colour in Language Comprehension.Louise Connell - 2007 - Cognition 102 (3):476-485.
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  • Metaphor Interpretation as Embodied Simulation.Raymond W. Gibbs - 2006 - Mind Language 21 (3):434-458.
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  • Embodiment Effects and Language Comprehension in Alzheimer's Disease.Marika De Scalzi, Jennifer Rusted & Jane Oakhill - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (5):890-917.
    It has been shown that when participants are asked to make sensibility judgments on sentences that describe a transfer of an object toward or away from their body, they are faster to respond when the response requires a movement in the same direction as the transfer described in the sentence. This phenomenon is known as the action compatibility effect. This study investigates whether the ACE exists for volunteers with Alzheimer's disease, whether the ACE can facilitate language comprehension, and also whether (...)
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  • Affect Biases Memory of Location: Evidence for the Spatial Representation of Affect.L. Elizabeth Crawford, Skye M. Margolies, John T. Drake & Meghan E. Murphy - 2006 - Cognition and Emotion 20 (8):1153-1169.
  • Meaning is Not a Reflex: Context Dependence of Spatial Congruity Effects.Daniel Casasanto, Geoffrey Brookshire & Richard Ivry - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1979-1986.
    In two experiments, Brookshire, Ivry, and Casasanto showed that words with positive and negative emotional valence can activate spatial representations with a high degree of automaticity, but also that this activation is highly context dependent. Lebois, Wilson-Mendenhall, and Barsalou reported that they “aimed to replicate” our study but found only null results in the “Brookshire et al. replication” conditions. Here we express concerns about three aspects of this paper. First, the study was not an attempt to replicate ours; it was (...)
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  • Perception of Auditory Motion Affects Language Processing.Michael P. Kaschak, Rolf A. Zwaan, Mark Aveyard & Richard H. Yaxley - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (4):733-744.
  • Flexible Conceptual Projection of Time Onto Spatial Frames of Reference.Ana Torralbo, Julio Santiago & Juan Lupiáñez - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (4):745-757.
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