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  1. Finding Science in Surprising Places: Gender and the Geography of Scientific Knowledge. Introduction to ‘Beyond the Academy: Histories of Gender and Knowledge’.Christine von Oertzen, Maria Rentetzi & Elizabeth S. Watkins - 2013 - Centaurus 55 (2):73-80.
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  • Discipline Building in Germany: Women and Genetics at the Berlin Institute for Heredity Research.Ida H. Stamhuis & Annette B. Vogt - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Science 50 (2).
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  • James Cossar Ewart and the Origins of the Animal Breeding Research Department in Edinburgh, 1895–1920.Clare Button - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (3):445-477.
    In 1919 the Animal Breeding Research Department was established in Edinburgh. This Department, later renamed the Institute of Animal Genetics, forged an international reputation, eventually becoming the centrepiece of a cluster of new genetics research units and institutions in Edinburgh after the Second World War. Yet despite its significance for institutionalising animal genetics research in the UK, the origins and development of the Department have not received as much scholarly attention as its importance warrants. This paper sheds new light on (...)
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  • Women as Mendelians and Geneticists.Marsha L. Richmond - 2015 - Science & Education 24 (1-2):125-150.
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  • The production of a physiological puzzle: how Cytisus adami confused and inspired a century’s botanists, gardeners, and evolutionists.John Lidwell-Durnin - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):48.
    ‘Adam’s laburnum’, produced by accident in 1825 by Jean-Louis Adam, a nurseryman in Vitry, became a commercial success within the plant trade for its striking mix of yellow and purple flowers. After it came to the attention of members of La Société d’Horticulture de Paris, the tree gained enormous fame as a potential instance of the much sought-after ‘graft hybrid’, a hypothetical idea that by grafting one plant onto another, a mixture of the two could be produced. As I show (...)
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  • Dogs and Coca-Cola: Commemorative Practices as Part of Laboratory Culture at the Heymans Institute Ghent, 1902-1970.Truus Van Bosstraeten - 2011 - Centaurus 53 (1):1-30.
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  • Kristine Bonnevie, Tine Tammes and Elisabeth Schiemann in Early Genetics: Emerging Chances for a University Career for Women. [REVIEW]Ida H. Stamhuis & Arve Monsen - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):427 - 466.
    The beginning of the twentieth century saw the emergence of the discipline of genetics. It is striking how many female scientists were contributing to this new field at the time. At least three female pioneers succeeded in becoming professors: Kristine Bonnevie (Norway), Elisabeth Schiemann (Germany) and the Tine Tammes (The Netherlands). The question is which factors contributed to the success of these women's careers? At the time women were gaining access to university education it had become quite the norm for (...)
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  • Muriel Wheldale Onslow and Early Biochemical Genetics.Marsha L. Richmond - 2007 - Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):389 - 426.
    Muriel Wheldale, a distinguished graduate of Newnham College, Cambridge, was a member of William Bateson's school of genetics at Cambridge University from 1903. Her investigation of flower color inheritance in snapdragons (Antirrhinum), a topic of particular interest to botanists, contributed to establishing Mendelism as a powerful new tool in studying heredity. Her understanding of the genetics of pigment formation led her to do cutting-edge work in biochemistry, culminating in the publication of her landmark work, The Anthocyanin Pigments of Plants (1916). (...)
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