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  1. Experiential Explanation.Sara Aronowitz & Tania Lombrozo - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
    People often answer why-questions with what we call experiential explanations: narratives or stories with temporal structure and concrete details. In contrast, on most theories of the epistemic function of explanation, explanations should be abstractive: structured by general relationships and lacking extraneous details. We suggest that abstractive and experiential explanations differ not only in level of abstraction, but also in structure, and that each form of explanation contributes to the epistemic goals of individual learners and of science. In particular, experiential explanations (...)
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  • Language-Guided Visual Processing Affects Reasoning: The Role of Referential and Spatial Anchoring.Magda L. Dumitru, Gitte H. Joergensen, Alice G. Cruickshank & Gerry T. M. Altmann - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):562-571.
    Language is more than a source of information for accessing higher-order conceptual knowledge. Indeed, language may determine how people perceive and interpret visual stimuli. Visual processing in linguistic contexts, for instance, mirrors language processing and happens incrementally, rather than through variously-oriented fixations over a particular scene. The consequences of this atypical visual processing are yet to be determined. Here, we investigated the integration of visual and linguistic input during a reasoning task. Participants listened to sentences containing conjunctions or disjunctions and (...)
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  • Motor Activation in Literal and Non-Literal Sentences: Does Time Matter?Cristina Cacciari & Francesca Pesciarelli - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • The Expression of Non-Actual Motion in Swedish, French and Thai.Johan Blomberg - 2015 - Cognitive Linguistics 26 (4):657-696.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 26 Heft: 4 Seiten: 657-696.
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  • Symbol Interdependency in Symbolic and Embodied Cognition.Max M. Louwerse - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):273-302.
    Whether computational algorithms such as latent semantic analysis (LSA) can both extract meaning from language and advance theories of human cognition has become a topic of debate in cognitive science, whereby accounts of symbolic cognition and embodied cognition are often contrasted. Albeit for different reasons, in both accounts the importance of statistical regularities in linguistic surface structure tends to be underestimated. The current article gives an overview of the symbolic and embodied cognition accounts and shows how meaning induction attributed to (...)
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  • Action Verbs Are Processed Differently in Metaphorical and Literal Sentences Depending on the Semantic Match of Visual Primes.Melissa Troyer, Lauren B. Curley, Luke E. Miller, Ayse P. Saygin & Benjamin K. Bergen - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Sticking Your Neck Out and Burying the Hatchet: What Idioms Reveal About Embodied Simulation.Natalie A. Kacinik - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Actual and Non-Actual Motion: Why Experientialist Semantics Needs Phenomenology.Johan Blomberg & Jordan Zlatev - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):395-418.
    Experientialist semantics has contributed to a broader notion of linguistic meaning by emphasizing notions such as construal, perspective, metaphor, and embodiment, but has suffered from an individualist concept of meaning and has conflated experiential motivations with conventional semantics. We argue that these problems can be redressed by methods and concepts from phenomenology, on the basis of a case study of sentences of non-actual motion such as “The mountain range goes all the way from Mexico to Canada.” Through a phenomenological reanalysis (...)
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  • Language Understanding is Grounded in Experiential Simulations: A Response to Weiskopf.Raymond W. Gibbs & Marcus Perlman - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):305-308.
    Several disciplines within the cognitive sciences have advanced the idea that people comprehend the actions of others, including the linguistic meanings they communicate, through embodied simulations where they imaginatively recreate the actions they observe or hear about. This claim has important consequences for theories of mind and meaning, such as that people’s use and interpretation of language emerges as a kind of bodily activity that is an essential part of ordinary cognition. Daniel Weiskopf presents several arguments against the idea that (...)
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  • An Enactivist Account of Abstract Words: Lessons From Merleau-Ponty.Brian A. Irwin - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):133-153.
    Enactivist accounts of language use generally treat concrete words in terms of motor intentionality systems and affordances for action. There is less consensus, though, regarding how abstract words are to be understood in enactivist terms. I draw on Merleau-Ponty’s later philosophy to argue, against the representationalist paradigm that has dominated the cognitive scientific and philosophical traditions, that language is fundamentally a mode of participation in our world. In particular, language orients us within our milieus in a manner that extends into (...)
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  • On the Path to Understanding on-Line Processing of Grammatical Aspect.Sarah Anderson, Teenie Matlock, Caitlin Fausey & Michael J. Spivey - 2008 - In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
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  • Grammatical Aspect and Temporal Distance in Motion Descriptions.Sarah E. Anderson, Teenie Matlock & Michael Spivey - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  • Eye Movements During Listening Reveal Spontaneous Grammatical Processing.Stephanie Huette, Bodo Winter, Teenie Matlock, David H. Ardell & Michael Spivey - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • High-Level Context Effects on Spatial Displacement: The Effects of Body Orientation and Language on Memory.David W. Vinson, Drew H. Abney, Rick Dale & Teenie Matlock - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Eye Movements Reveal Mental Looking Through Time.Kurt Stocker, Matthias Hartmann, Corinna S. Martarelli & Fred W. Mast - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):1648-1670.
    People often make use of a spatial “mental time line” to represent events in time. We investigated whether the eyes follow such a mental time line during online language comprehension of sentences that refer to the past, present, and future. Participants' eye movements were measured on a blank screen while they listened to these sentences. Saccade direction revealed that the future is mapped higher up in space than the past. Moreover, fewer saccades were made when two events are simultaneously taking (...)
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  • Eye Movements Reveal the Dynamic Simulation of Speed in Language.Laura J. Speed & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (2):367-382.
    This study investigates how speed of motion is processed in language. In three eye-tracking experiments, participants were presented with visual scenes and spoken sentences describing fast or slow events (e.g., The lion ambled/dashed to the balloon). Results showed that looking time to relevant objects in the visual scene was affected by the speed of verb of the sentence, speaking rate, and configuration of a supporting visual scene. The results provide novel evidence for the mental simulation of speed in language and (...)
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  • How Linguistic Metaphor Scaffolds Reasoning.Paul H. Thibodeau, Rose K. Hendricks & Lera Boroditsky - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (11):852-863.
  • Conversation, Gaze Coordination, and Beliefs About Visual Context.Daniel C. Richardson, Rick Dale & John M. Tomlinson - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (8):1468-1482.
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  • When Do Language Comprehenders Mentally Simulate Locations?Nian Liu & Benjamin Bergen - 2016 - Cognitive Linguistics 27 (2):181-203.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 27 Heft: 2 Seiten: 181-203.
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  • Turning Back to Experience in Cognitive Linguistics Via Phenomenology.Jordan Zlatev - 2016 - Cognitive Linguistics 27 (4):559-572.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Cognitive Linguistics Jahrgang: 27 Heft: 4 Seiten: 559-572.
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