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  1. Biases and Heuristics in Decision Making and Their Impact on Autonomy.J. S. Blumenthal-Barby - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (5):5-15.
    Cognitive scientists have identified a wide range of biases and heuristics in human decision making over the past few decades. Only recently have bioethicists begun to think seriously about the implications of these findings for topics such as agency, autonomy, and consent. This article aims to provide an overview of biases and heuristics that have been identified and a framework in which to think comprehensively about the impact of them on the exercise of autonomous decision making. I analyze the impact (...)
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  • Priority Setting and Patient Adaptation to Disability and Illness: Outcomes of a Qualitative Study.John McKie, Rosalind Hurworth, Bradley Shrimpton, Jeff Richardson & Catherine Bell - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 22 (3):255-271.
    The study examined the question of who should make decisions for a National Health Scheme about the allocation of health resources when the health states of beneficiaries could change because of adaptation. Eight semi-structured small group discussions were conducted. Following focus group theory, interviews commenced with general questions followed by transition questions and ended with a ‘focus’ or ‘key’ question. Participants were presented with several scenarios in which patients adapted to their health states. They were then asked their views about (...)
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  • Taking the Satisfaction (and the Life) Out of Life Satisfaction.Daniel M. Haybron - 2011 - Philosophical Explorations 14 (3):249-262.
    The science of well-being studies an evaluative kind, well-being, which raises natural worries about the ability of empirical research to deliver. This paper argues that well-being research can provide important information about how people are doing without entangling itself very deeply in controversial normative claims. Most life satisfaction research, for instance, purports only to tell us how people see their lives going relative to what they care about ? something most people can agree is important, whatever their theory of well-being. (...)
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  • Just End-of-Life Policies and Patient Dignity.Richard E. Grant & Michael Boylan - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):32 – 33.
  • Experienced Utility or Decision Utility for QALY Calculation? Both.Paige A. Clayton & Douglas P. MacKay - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (1):82-89.
    Policy-makers must allocate scarce resources to support constituents’ health needs. This requires policy-makers to be able to evaluate health states and allocate resources according to some principle of allocation. The most prominent approach to evaluating health states is to appeal to the strength of people’s preferences to avoid occupying them, which we refer to as decision utility metrics. Another approach, experienced utility metrics, evaluates health states based on their hedonic quality. In this article, we argue that although decision utility metrics (...)
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  • Disability and Sunshine: Can Hedonic Predictions Be Improved by Drawing Attention to Focusing Illusions or Emotional Adaptation?Peter A. Ubel, George Loewenstein & Christopher Jepson - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 11 (2):111-123.
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  • Reconciling the Disability Critique and Reproductive Liberty: The Case of Negative Genetic Selection.Melinda C. Hall - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):121-143.
    The following is dedicated to promoting a version of the disability critique of negative genetic selection while navigating claims that launching such a critique threatens reproductive liberty or is unavoidably antichoice. I highlight problematic conceptual assumptions regarding genetics and choice made by proponents and opponents of selection alike and bring out the underlying ableist values of the prevailing conversation. Ableism is discrimination against persons on the basis of perceived disability. I conclude that the existing social and institutional milieu surrounding genetic (...)
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  • Moral Imagination, Disability and Embodiment.Catriona Mackenzie & Jackie Leach Scully - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (4):335–351.
  • Unequal Stakeholders: "For You, It's an Academic Exercise; for Me, It's My Life".Kristi L. Kirschner - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):30 – 32.
  • The Curse of Hope.Fabrice Le Lec & Serge Macé - 2018 - Theory and Decision 84 (3):429-451.
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  • Predicting End-of-Life Treatment Preferences: Perils and Practicalities.P. H. Ditto & C. J. Clark - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):196-204.
    Rid and Wendler propose the development of a Patient Preference Predictor (PPP), an actuarial model for predicting incapacitated patient’s life-sustaining treatment preferences across a wide range of end-of-life scenarios. An actuarial approach to end-of-life decision making has enormous potential, but transferring the logic of actuarial prediction to end-of-life decision making raises several conceptual complexities and logistical problems that need further consideration. Actuarial models have proven effective in targeted prediction tasks, but no evidence supports their effectiveness in the kind of broad (...)
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