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  1. The Ethics of the Societal Entrenchment-Approach and the Case of Live Uterus Transplantation-IVF.Lisa Guntram & Kristin Zeiler - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  • Just Love in Live Organ Donation.Kristin Zeiler - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):323-331.
    Emotionally-related live organ donation is different from almost all other medical treatments in that a family member or, in some countries, a friend contributes with an organ or parts of an organ to the recipient. Furthermore, there is a long-acknowledged but not well-understood gender-imbalance in emotionally-related live kidney donation. This article argues for the benefit of the concept of just love as an analytic tool in the analysis of emotionally-related live organ donation where the potential donor(s) and the recipient are (...)
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  • Making Sense of Risk. Donor Risk Communication in Families Considering Living Liverdonation to a Child.Mare Knibbe & Marian Verkerk - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):149-156.
    This paper contributes to the growing line of thought in bioethics that respect for autonomy should not be equated to the facilitation of individualistic self determination through standard requirements of informed consent in all healthcare contexts. The paper describes how in the context of donation for living related liver transplantation (LRLT) meaningful, responsible decision making is often embedded within family processes and its negotiation. We suggest that good donor risk communication in families promote “conscientious autonomy” and “reflective trust”. From this, (...)
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  • For the Benefit of Another: Children, Moral Decency, and Non-Therapeutic Medical Procedures.Robert Noggle - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (4):289-310.
    Parents are usually appreciated as possessing legitimate moral authority to compel children to make at least modest sacrifices in the service of widely shared values of moral decency. This essay argues that such authority justifies allowing parents to authorize a child to serve as an organ or tissue donor in certain circumstances, such as to authorize bone marrow donations to save a sibling with whom the potential donor shares a deep emotional bond. The approach explored here suggests, however, that at (...)
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  • Live Liver Donation, Ethics and Practitioners: 'I Am Between the Two and If I Do Not Feel Comfortable About This Situation, I Cannot Proceed'.H. Draper, S. R. Bramhall, J. Herington & E. H. Thomas - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):157-162.
    This paper discusses the views of 17 healthcare practitioners involved with transplantation on the ethics of live liver donations . Donations between emotionally related donor and recipients increased the acceptability of an LLD compared with those between strangers. Most healthcare professionals disapproved of altruistic stranger donations, considering them to entail an unacceptable degree of risk taking. Participants tended to emphasise the need to balance the harms of proceeding against those of not proceeding, rather than calculating the harm-to-benefits ratio of donor (...)
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  • Kidney Transplants From Young Children and the Mentally Retarded.David Steinberg - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):229-241.
    Kidney donation by young children and the mentally retarded has been supported by court decisions, arguments based on obligations inherent in family relationships, an array of contextual factors, and the principle of beneficence. These justifications for taking organs from people who cannot protect themselves are problematic and must be weighed against our obligation to protect the vulnerable. A compromise solution is presented that strongly protects young children and the mentally retarded but does not abdicate all responsibility to relieve suffering. Guidelines (...)
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  • Understanding Collective Agency in Bioethics.Katharina Beier, Isabella Jordan, Claudia Wiesemann & Silke Schicktanz - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):411-422.
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  • „Wir wissen es alle, nur sprechen wir es nie aus.““We all know it; we just never say it”.Solveig Lena Hansen & Sabine Wöhlke - 2015 - Ethik in der Medizin 27 (1):23-34.
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  • Thoughts on the Bioethics of Estranged Biological Kin.Lisa Cassidy - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):32-48.
    This paper considers the bioethics of estranged biological kin, who are biologically related people not in contact with one another (due to adoption, abandonment, or other long-term estrangement). Specifically, I am interested in what is owed to estranged biological kin in the event of medical need. A survey of current bioethics demonstrates that most analyses are not prepared to reckon with the complications of having or being estranged biological kin. For example, adoptees might wonder if a lack of contact with (...)
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  • Confounders in Voluntary Consent About Living Parental Liver Donation: No Choice and Emotions. [REVIEW]M. E. Knibbe, E. L. M. Maeckelberghe & M. A. Verkerk - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):433-440.
    Parents’ perception of having no choice and strong emotions like fear about the prospect of living liver donation can lead professionals to question the voluntariness of their decision. We discuss the relation of these experiences (no choice and emotions), as they are communicated by parents in our study, to the requirement of voluntariness. The perceived lack of choice, and emotions are two themes we found in the interviews conducted within the “Living Related Donation; a Qualitative-Ethical Study” research program. As a (...)
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  • Moral Tales of Parental Living Kidney Donation: A Parenthood Moral Imperative and its Relevance for Decision Making. [REVIEW]Kristin Zeiler, Lisa Guntram & Anette Lennerling - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):225-236.
    Free and informed choice is an oft-acknowledged ethical basis for living kidney donation, including parental living kidney donation. The extent to which choice is present in parental living kidney donation has, however, been questioned. Since parents can be expected to have strong emotional bonds to their children, it has been asked whether these bonds make parents unable to say no to this donation. This article combines a narrative analysis of parents’ stories of living kidney donation with a philosophical discussion of (...)
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  • Intimacy and Family Consent: A Confucian Ideal.Shui Chuen Lee - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):418-436.
    In the West, mainstream bioethicists tend to appreciate intimate relationships as a hindrance to individual autonomy. Scholars have even argued against approaching a mother to donate a kidney to save the life of her child; the request, they claim, is too manipulative and, thereby, violates her autonomy. For Chinese bioethicists, such a moral analysis is absurd. The intimate relationship between mother and child establishes strong mutual obligations. It creates mutual moral responsibilities that often require sacrifices for each other. This paper (...)
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  • Surrogate Motherhood: A Trust-Based Approach.Katharina Beier - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (6):633-652.
    Because it is often argued that surrogacy should not be treated as contractual, the question arises in which terms this practice might then be couched. In this article, I argue that a phenomenology of surrogacy centering on the notion of trust provides a description that is illuminating from the moral point of view. My thesis is that surrogacy establishes a complex and extended reproductive unit––the “surrogacy triad” consisting of the surrogate mother, the child, and the intending parents––whose constituents are bound (...)
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  • Where Families and Healthcare Meet.M. A. Verkerk, H. Lindemann, J. McLaughlin, J. L. Scully, U. Kihlbom, J. Nelson & J. Chin - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):183-185.
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  • Live Kidney Donations and the Ethic of Care.Francis Kane, Grace Clement & Mary Kane - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (3):173-188.
    In this paper, we seek to re-conceptualize the ethical framework through which ethicists and medical professionals view the practice of live kidney donations. The ethics of organ donation has been understood primarily within the framework of individual rights and impartiality, but we show that the ethic of care captures the moral situation of live kidney donations in a more coherent and comprehensive way, and offers guidance for practitioners that is more attentive to the actual moral transactions among donors and recipients. (...)
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