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Paul Robbins (2004). Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction.

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  1.  11
    Low-Carbon Food Supply: The Ecological Geography of Cuban Urban Agriculture and Agroecological Theory.Gustav Cederlöf - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (4).
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    Abandoning Land in Search of Farms: Challenges of Subsistence Migrant Farming in Ghana.Vincent Z. Kuuire, Paul Mkandawire, Isaac Luginaah & Godwin Arku - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2).
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  3.  15
    The Cultural Politics of the Agroecological Transition.David Meek - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2).
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  4.  15
    Locality to Nonlocality: Transpersonal Dimensions of Home.Jeanine M. Canty - 2015 - World Futures 71 (3-4):76-85.
    This article explores the relationship between globalization and localization in context of our current ecological and social crisis. The benefits of immersing in one's local community and ecology are presented through an ecopsychological lens. Transpersonal dimensions of place are examined, reframing globalism as our seamless connections through the planetary life force. The author contends that while deepening our local relationships with place is essential for sustainability, developing our wider connections is essential for collective wellbeing.
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    Conservation as a Protonorm for Moral Communication.Melba Hoffer - 2014 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (4):225-237.
    The scale and severity of the alterations to global ecologies should not simply be noted or acknowledged by communication scholars but rather should drive communication ethicists to carefully examine the values and communication practices that have enabled and promoted this kind of unchecked growth. At minimum, I argue, we ought to carefully examine this social trajectory to determine whether more growth at the current rate of speed should continue to be a goal of modern society and at what costs. Specifically, (...)
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  6.  14
    Regarding Biocultural Heritage: In Situ Political Ecology of Agricultural Biodiversity in the Peruvian Andes. [REVIEW]T. Garrett Graddy - 2013 - Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):587-604.
    This paper emerges from and aims to contribute to conversations on agricultural biodiversity loss, value, and renewal. Standard international responses to the crisis of agrobiodiversity erosion focus mostly on ex situ preservation of germplasm, with little financial and strategic support for in situ cultivation. Yet, one agrarian collective in the Peruvian Andes—the Parque de la Papa (Parque)—has repatriated a thousand native potatoes from the gene bank in Lima so as to catalyze in situ regeneration of lost agricultural biodiversity in the (...)
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  7.  11
    The Politics and Ethics of Land Concessions in Rural Cambodia.Andreas Neef, Siphat Touch & Jamaree Chiengthong - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1085-1103.
    In rural Cambodia the rampant allocation of state land to political elites and foreign investors in the form of “Economic Land Concessions (ELCs)”—estimated to cover an area equivalent to more than 50 % of the country’s arable land—has been associated with encroachment on farmland, community forests and indigenous territories and has contributed to a rapid increase of rural landlessness. By contrast, less than 7,000 ha of land have been allotted to land-poor and landless farmers under the pilot project for “Social (...)
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    Continuing Issues in the Limitations of Pesticide Use in Developing Countries.Kishor Atreya, Bishal Sitaula, Fred Johnsen & Roshan Bajracharya - 2011 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):49-62.
    The rationale for pesticide use in agriculture is that costs associated with pesticide pollution are to be justified by its benefits, but this is not so obvious. Valuing the benefits by simple economic analysis has increased pesticide use in agriculture and consequently produced pesticide-induced “public ills.” This paper attempts to explore the research gaps of the economic and social consequences of pesticide use in developing countries, particularly with an example of Nepal. We argue that although the negative sides of agricultural (...)
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  9.  17
    Agriculture, Livelihoods, and Globalization: The Analysis of New Trajectories (and Avoidance of Just-so Stories) of Human-Environment Change and Conservation. [REVIEW]Karl S. Zimmerer - 2007 - Agriculture and Human Values 24 (1):9-16.
    Globalization offers a mix of new trajectories for agriculture, livelihoods, resource use, and environmental conservation. The papers in this issue share elements that advance our understanding of these new trajectories. The shared elements suggest an approach that places stress on: (i) the common ground of theoretical concepts (local-global interactions), methodologies (case study design), and analytical frameworks (spatio-temporal emphasis); (ii) farm-level economic diversification and the dynamics of agricultural intensification-disintensification; (iii) the pervasive role of agricultural as well as environmental institutions, organizations, and (...)
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