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  1. Reply Module.Jerry A. Fodor - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):33-42.
  • Controlled Versus Automatic Processing.Robert J. Sternberg - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):32-33.
  • Lexicon as Module.Mark S. Seidenberg - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):31-32.
  • Organic Insight Into Mental Organs.Barry Schwartz - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):30-31.
  • Encapsulation and Expectation.Roger Schank & Larry Hunter - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):29-30.
  • A Rapprochement of Biology, Psychology, and Philosophy.Sandra Scarr - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):29-29.
  • Faculties, Modules, and Computers.Daniel N. Robinson - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):28-29.
  • Quinity, Isotropy, and Wagnerian Rapture.Georges Rey - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):27-28.
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  • Vertically Unparalleled.Ignatius G. Mattingly & Alvin M. Liberman - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):24-26.
  • Too Little and Latent.John Morton - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):26-27.
  • Combe's Crucible and the Music of the Modules.John C. Marshall - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):23-24.
  • Parallel Processing Explains Modular Informational Encapsulation.Marcel Kinsbourne - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):23-23.
  • The Modularity of Behavior.Peter R. Killeen - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):22-23.
  • The Mind as a Necker Cube.Jerome Kagan - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):21-22.
  • What Constitutes a Module?Peter W. Jusczyk & Asher Cohen - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):20-21.
  • Evidence for and Against Modularity.Earl Hunt - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):19-20.
  • Cognitive Self-Organization and Neural Modularity.Stephen Grossberg - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):18-19.
  • On Gall's Reputation and Some Recent “New Phrenology”.C. G. Gross - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):16-18.
  • Fodor's Holism.Clark Glymour - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):15-16.
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  • Modularity: Contextual Interactions and the Tractability of Nonmodular Systems.Sam Glucksberg - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):14-15.
  • The Centrality of Modules.Howard Gardner - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):12-14.
  • A Modular Sense of Place?C. R. Gallistel & Ken Cheng - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):11-12.
  • Special Purpose Computation: All is Not One.K. I. Forster - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):9-11.
  • Module or Muddle?Janet Dean Fodor - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):7-9.
  • On Spearman's “Problem of Correlation”.John B. Carroll - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):7-7.
  • A Neo-Cartesian Alternative.David Caplan - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):6-7.
  • Precis of the Modularity of Mind.Jerry A. Fodor - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):1-42.
    The Modularity of Mind proposes an alternative to the or view of cognitive architecture that has dominated several decades of cognitive science. Whereas interactionism stresses the continuity of perceptual and cognitive processes, modularity theory argues for their distinctness. It is argued, in particular, that the apparent plausibility of New Look theorizing derives from the failure to distinguish between the (correct) claim that perceptual processes are inferential and the (dubious) claim that they are unencapsidated, that is, that they are arbitrarily sensitive (...)
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  • Thomas Reid and Philosophy with Children.Fiachra Long - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (4):599–614.