Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Contractualism, Reciprocity, Compensation.David Alm - 2007 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 2 (3):1-23.
    Two generally recognized moral duties are to reciprocate benefits one has received from others and to compensate harms one has done to others. In this paper I want to show that it is not possible to give an adequate account of either duty – or at least one that corresponds to our actual practices – within a contractualist moral theory of the type developed by T. M. Scanlon (1982, 1998). This fact is interesting in its own right, as contractualism is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery and Structural Racial Injustice in France: Using Iris Young’s Social Connection Model of Responsibility.Magali Bessone - 2019 - Critical Horizons 20 (2):161-177.
    ABSTRACTThe incorrect conceptualization and evaluation of reparations for colonial slave trade and slavery within the legal, as opposed to the political, domain, produces an interpretation of the demands in France that views them as morally absurd and politically deleterious. I’ll use Iris Marion Young’s distinction between a liability model and a social connection model of responsibility to suggest that the moral claim according to which we can be held responsible today for redressing the structural injustices inherited from slave trade and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reparations and Racial Inequality.Derrick Darby - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (1):55-66.
    A recent development in philosophical scholarship on reparations for black chattel slavery and Jim Crow segregation is reliance upon social science in normative arguments for reparations. Although there are certainly positive things to be said in favor of an empirically informed normative argument for black reparations, given the depth of empirical disagreement about the causes of persistent racial inequalities, and the ethos of 'post-racial' America, the strongest normative argument for reparations may be one that goes through irrespective of how we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations