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  1. How the World Is Measured Up in Size Experience.David J. Bennett - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (2):345-365.
    I develop a Russellian representationalist account of size experience that draws importantly from contemporary vision science research on size perception. The core view is that size is experienced in ‘body-scaled’ units. So, an object might, say, be experienced as two eye-level units high. The view is sharpened in response to Thompson’s (forthcoming) Doubled Earth example. This example is presented by Thompson as part of an argument for a Fregean view of size experience. But I argue that the Russellian view I (...)
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  • First-Person Investigations of Consciousness.Brentyn Ramm - 2016 - Dissertation, The Australian National University
    This dissertation defends the reliability of first-person methods for studying consciousness, and applies first-person experiments to two philosophical problems: the experience of size and of the self. In chapter 1, I discuss the motivations for taking a first-person approach to consciousness, the background assumptions of the dissertation and some methodological preliminaries. In chapter 2, I address the claim that phenomenal judgements are far less reliable than perceptual judgements (Schwitzgebel, 2011). I argue that the main errors and limitations in making phenomenal (...)
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  • Against Direct Perception.Shimon Ullman - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):333-81.
    Central to contemporary cognitive science is the notion that mental processes involve computations defined over internal representations. This view stands in sharp contrast to the to visual perception and cognition, whose most prominent proponent has been J.J. Gibson. In the direct theory, perception does not involve computations of any sort; it is the result of the direct pickup of available information. The publication of Gibson's recent book (Gibson 1979) offers an opportunity to examine his approach, and, more generally, to contrast (...)
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  • Can the Brain Be Divided Into a Sensory and a Motor Part?Volker Henn - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):70-71.
  • The Dynamic Ebbinghaus: Motion Dynamics Greatly Enhance the Classic Contextual Size Illusion.Ryan E. B. Mruczek, Christopher D. Blair, Lars Strother & Gideon P. Caplovitz - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Simultaneous Visual Adaptation to Tilt and Displacement: A Test of Independent Processes.Gordon M. Redding - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (1):41-42.
  • Motor Factors in Perception.John Gyr, Richmond Willey & Adele Henry - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):86-94.
  • Separating the Issues Involved in the Role of Bodily Movement in Perception and Perceptual-Motor Coordination.Robert B. Welch - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):85-86.
  • Three Functions of Motor-Sensory Feedback in Object Perception.Hans Wallach - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):84-85.
  • Attentional Factors in Depth Perception.Richard D. Walk - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):83-84.
  • The Thesis of the Efference-Mediation of Vision Cannot Be Rationalized.M. T. Turvey - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):81-83.
  • Visuomotor Feedback: A Short Supplement to Gyr's Journey Around a Polka-Dotted Cylinder.J. Jacques Vonèche - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):83-83.
  • Methodological Considerations in Replicating Held and Rekosh's Perceptual Adaptation Study.Martin J. Steinbach - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):81-81.
  • Oculomotor Hysteresis: Implications for Testing Sensorimotor and Ecological Optics Theories.Wayne L. Shebilske - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):80-80.
  • Motor System Changes Are Not Necessary for Changes in Perception.George Singer, Meredith Wallace & John K. Collins - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):80-81.
  • Voluntary Movement and Perception in Intrapersonal and Extrapersonal Space.P. E. Roland - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):79-80.
  • Re-Afference in Space and Movement Perception.Austin H. Riesen - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):78-78.
  • The Problem of Adaptation to Prismatically-Altered Shape.Irvin Rock - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):78-79.
  • Attention as an Explanatory Concept in Perceptual Adaptation.Gordon M. Redding - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):77-78.
  • Centrifugal Contributions to Visual Perceptual After Effects.K. S. K. Murthy - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):77-77.
  • Position Information Versus Motor Programs: Two Levels of Sensorimotor Theory.Kenneth R. Paap - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):77-77.
  • Visual-Motor Conflict Resolved by Motor Adaptation Without Perceptual Change.Joel M. Miller - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):76-76.
  • Adaptation of the Distortion of Shape is Different From Adaptation to the Distortion of Space.H. H. Mikaelian - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):76-76.
  • The Encoding of Spatial Position in the Brain.Joseph S. Lappin - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):74-75.
  • Non-Visual Determinants of Perception.Arien Mack - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):75-76.
  • A Provisional Sensory/Motor “Complementarity” Model for Adaptation Effects.Ivo Kohler - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):73-74.
  • Motor-Sensory Feedback Formulations: Are We Asking the Right Questions?J. A. Scott Kelso - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):72-73.
  • Is There Curvature Adaptation Not Attributable to Purely Intravisual Phenomena?Julian Hochberg & Leon Festinger - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):71-71.
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  • Visuomotor Experiments: Failure to Replicate, or Failure to Match the Theory?Marc Jeannerod - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):71-71.
  • When is Sensory-Motor Information Necessary, When Only Useful, and When Superfluous?Ralph Norman Haber - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):68-70.
  • Evaluating Nonreplication: More Theory and Background Necessary.Lewis O. Harvey - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):70-70.
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  • Motor Factors in Perception: Limitations in Empirical and Hierarchical Analysis.David Freides - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):68-68.
  • Nonrandom Curvature Adaptation to Random Visual Displays.Ronald A. Finke - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):68-68.
  • Insufficiencies in Perceptual Adaptation Theory.Sheldon M. Ebenholtz - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):67-68.
  • What is Self-Induced Motor Activity Adapting To?R. H. Day - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):66-67.
  • A Stationary Subject Does Perceive Curvature When Wearing a Prism in a Spotted Drum.Brian Craske - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):66-66.
  • Adaptation to Curvature in the Absence of Contour.Clarke A. Burnham - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):65-66.
  • Adaptation and the Two-Visual-Systems Hypothesis.Bruce Bridgeman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):64-65.
  • Perception, Information, and Computation.S. Ullman - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):408-415.
  • What Are the Contributions of the Direct Perception Approach?Carl B. Zuckerman - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):407-408.
  • The Computational/Representational Paradigm as Normal Science: Further Support.Steven W. Zucker - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):406-407.
  • Percepts, Intervening Variables, and Neural Mechanisms.Wally Welker - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):405-406.
  • Logical Atomism and Computation Do Not Refute Gibson.Walter B. Welmer - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):405-405.
  • In Defense of Invariances and Higher-Order Stimuli.K. von Fieandt - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):404-405.
  • What Kind of Indirect Process is Visual Perception?Aaron Sloman - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):401-404.
  • Abstract Machine Theory and Direct Perception.Robert Shaw & James Todd - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):400-401.
  • There is More to Psychological Meaningfulness Than Computation and Representation.Sverker Runeson - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):399-400.
  • Difficulties with a Direct Theory of Perception.Irvin Rock - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):398-399.
  • Information Pickup is the Activity of Perceiving.Edward S. Reed - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):397-398.
  • Animal-Environment Mutuality and Direct Perception.Sandra S. Prindle, Claudia Carello & M. T. Turvey - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):395-397.