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  1. Regulating “Good” People in Subtle Conflicts of Interest Situations.Yuval Feldman & Eliran Halali - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (1):65-83.
    Growing recognition in both the psychological and management literature of the concept of “good people” has caused a paradigm shift in our understanding of wrongful behavior: Wrongdoings that were previously assumed to be based on conscious choice—that is, deliberate decisions—are often the product of intuitive processes that prevent people from recognizing the wrongfulness of their behavior. Several leading scholars have dubbed this process as an ethical “blind spot.” This study explores the main implications of the good people paradigm on the (...)
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  • Drug Firms, the Codification of Diagnostic Categories, and Bias in Clinical Guidelines.Lisa Cosgrove & Emily E. Wheeler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):644-653.
    The possibility that industry is exerting an undue influence on the culture of medicine has profound implications for the profession's public health mission. Policy analysts, investigative journalists, researchers, and clinicians have questioned whether academic-industry relationships have had a corrupting effect on evidence-based medicine. Psychiatry has been at the heart of this epistemic and ethical crisis in medicine. This article examines how commercial entities, such as pharmaceutical companies, influence psychiatric taxonomy and treatment guidelines. Using the conceptual framework of institutional corruption, we (...)
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  • Rooting Out Institutional Corruption to Manage Inappropriate Off‐Label Drug Use.Marc A. Rodwin - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):654-664.
    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved — off-label drug use — can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should address the (...)
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  • Curbing Misconduct in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Insights From Behavioral Ethics and the Behavioral Approach to Law.Yuval Feldman, Rebecca Gauthier & Troy Schuler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):620-628.
    Two insights of psychology on which we would like to draw are that people react to law in more complex ways than rational-choice models assume and that good people sometimes do bad things. With that starting point, this article provides a behavioral perspective on some of the factors that policymakers seeking to reduce the level of misconduct in the pharmaceutical industry should consider. Effective regulation and enforcement need to address the following questions: Who are the regulation's targeted actors — researchers (...)
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  • Trust and Transparency: Patient Perceptions of Physicians' Financial Relationships with Pharmaceutical Companies.Joshua E. Perry, Dena Cox & Anthony D. Cox - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):475-491.
    Financial ties between physicians and pharmaceutical companies are pervasive and controversial. However, little is known about how patients perceive such ties. This paper describes an experiment examining how a national sample of U.S. adults perceived a variety of financial relationships between physicians and drug companies. Each respondent read a single scenario about a hypothetical physician and his financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry; scenarios varied in terms of payment type of and amount. Respondents then evaluated the physician on several dimensions (...)
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  • Trust and Transparency: Patient Perceptions of Physicians' Financial Relationships with Pharmaceutical Companies.Joshua E. Perry, Dena Cox & Anthony D. Cox - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):475-491.
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  • Pharmaceuticals, Political Money, and Public Policy: A Theoretical and Empirical Agenda.Paul D. Jorgensen - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):561-570.
  • Drug Firms, the Codification of Diagnostic Categories, and Bias in Clinical Guidelines.Lisa Cosgrove & Emily E. Wheeler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):644-653.
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  • Rooting Out Institutional Corruption to Manage Inappropriate Off-Label Drug Use.Marc A. Rodwin - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):654-664.
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  • Curbing Misconduct in the Pharmaceutical Industry: Insights From Behavioral Ethics and the Behavioral Approach to Law.Yuval Feldman, Rebecca Gauthier & Troy Schuler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):620-628.
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