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Essays on Aristotle's Ethics

University of California Press (1980)

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  1. Plato and the Love of Learning.Geoffrey Hinchliffe - 2006 - Ethics and Education 1 (2):117-131.
    This paper explores the relation between love, learning and knowledge as found in three dialogues of Plato, Symposium, Phaedrus and Republic. It argues that the account of the ascent from carnal desire to the love of beauty, as set out in the Symposium, is best seen in terms of a genealogy of love in which the object of love is transformed into an object of knowledge. The Phaedrus shows us how affection and love between two individuals can help motivate a (...)
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  • Aristotle on Vice.Jozef Müller - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (3):459-477.
    In this paper, I argue that the widely held view that Aristotle's vicious agent is a principled follower of a wrong conception of the good whose soul, just like the soul of the virtuous agent, is marked by harmony between his reason and non-rational desires is an exegetical mistake. Rather, Aristotle holds – consistently and throughout the Nicomachean Ethics – that the vicious agent lacks any real principles of action and that his soul lacks unity and harmony even more than (...)
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  • Virtue Jurisprudence a Virtue–Centred Theory of Judging.Lawrence B. Solum - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (1/2):178--213.
    “Virtue jurisprudence” is a normative and explanatory theory of law that utilises the resources of virtue ethics to answer the central questions of legal theory. The main focus of this essay is the development of a virtue–centred theory of judging. The exposition of the theory begins with exploration of defects in judicial character, such as corruption and incompetence. Next, an account of judicial virtue is introduced. This includes judicial wisdom, a form of phronesis, or sound practical judgement. A virtue–centred account (...)
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  • Capability and Deliberation.Geoffrey Hinchliffe - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (5):403-413.
  • Reviving Greco‐Roman Friendship: A Bibliographical Review.Heather Devere - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):149-187.
  • The Problem of Continence in Contemporary Virtue Ethics.Nicholas Schroeder - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (1):85-104.
    The harmony thesis claims that a virtuous agent will not experience inner conflict or pain when acting. The continent agent, on the other hand, is conflicted or pained when acting virtuously, making him inferior to the virtuous agent. But following Karen Stohr’s counterexample, we can imagine a case like a company owner who needs to fire some of her employees to save her company, where acting with conflict or pain is not only appropriate, but necessary in the situation. This creates (...)
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  • Living Under the Guidance of Reason: Arne Naess's Interpretation of Spinoza.Espen Gamlund - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):2-17.
    There is no doubt that Spinoza values what he calls living under the guidance of reason, and that he somehow equates such a life with happiness. What is less clear is exactly how he conceives of such a life, and thus how he conceives of human happiness. According to Arne Naess's interpretation of Spinoza, the virtuous and free person will prefer the life of action, and happiness is best realised through living an active life “in the world”. Other scholars, however, (...)
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  • An Aristotelian Theory of Moral Development.Bernadette M. Tobin - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 23 (2):195–211.
  • On the Tedium of the Good.Samantha Vice - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (4):459-476.
    It seems to be a phenomenon of contemporary life that we consider goodness embarrassing and rather dull. In contrast, the activities and inner lives of villains are deemed more complex and fascinating than those of good people. This paper attempts to understand the conception of goodness that underlies this phenomenon, and I suggest that informing it is the combination of two ideas, in tension with each other: firstly, a distorted understanding of the ancient conception of full virtue as the absence (...)
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