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  1. The Cognitive Foundations of Cultural Stability and Diversity.Dan Sperber & Lawrence A. Hirschfeld - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):40-46.
  • Adaptationism for Human Cognition: Strong, Spurious, or Weak?Scott Atran - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (1):39-67.
    Strong adaptationists explore complex organic design as taskspecific adaptations to ancestral environments. This strategy seems best when there is evidence of homology. Weak adaptationists don't assume that complex organic (including cognitive and linguistic) functioning necessarily or primarily represents taskspecific adaptation. This approach to cognition resembles physicists' attempts to deductively explain the most facts with fewest hypotheses. For certain domainspecific competencies (folkbiology) strong adaptationism is useful but not necessary to research. With grouplevel belief systems (religion) strong adaptationism degenerates into spurious notions (...)
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  • The Weirdest People in the World?Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):61-83.
    Behavioral scientists routinely publish broad claims about human psychology and behavior in the world's top journals based on samples drawn entirely from Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) societies. Researchers assume that either there is little variation across human populations, or that these are as representative of the species as any other population. Are these assumptions justified? Here, our review of the comparative database from across the behavioral sciences suggests both that there is substantial variability in experimental results across (...)
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  • Grammatical Gender and Inferences About Biological Properties in German-Speaking Children.Henrik Saalbach, Mutsumi Imai & Lennart Schalk - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1251-1267.
    In German, nouns are assigned to one of the three gender classes. For most animal names, however, the assignment is independent of the referent’s biological sex. We examined whether German-speaking children understand this independence of grammar from semantics or whether they assume that grammatical gender is mapped onto biological sex when drawing inferences about sex-specific biological properties of animals. Two cross-linguistic studies comparing German-speaking and Japanese-speaking preschoolers were conducted. The results suggest that German-speaking children utilize grammatical gender as a cue (...)
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  • Human-Sled Dog Relations: What Can We Learn From the Stories and Experiences of Mushers?Gail Kuhl - 2011 - Society and Animals 19 (1):22-37.
    In this qualitative study, the elements and quality of musher-sled dog relationships were investigated. In-depth interviews with a narrative design were conducted with eight mushers from northern Minnesota and northwestern Ontario. The mushers were asked to contribute ideas by sharing stories and experiences of working with dogs, as well as art or photographs. While all the participants had their own ideas about musher-sled dog relationships, six themes emerged. The mushers stated the importance of getting to know the dogs, their respect (...)
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  • Adaptationism.Steven Hecht Orzack - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Knowledge, Expectations, and Inductive Reasoning Within Conceptual Hierarchies.John D. Coley, Brett Hayes, Christopher Lawson & Michelle Moloney - 2004 - Cognition 90 (3):217-253.
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  • Folkbiology of Freshwater Fish.Douglas L. Medin, Norbert O. Ross, Scott Atran, Douglas Cox, John Coley, Julia B. Proffitt & Sergey Blok - 2006 - Cognition 99 (3):237-273.
  • Ontological Constraints in Children's Inductive Inferences: Evidence From a Comparison of Inferences Within Animals and Vehicles.Andrzej Tarlowski - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Conceptualizing Agency: Folkpsychological and Folkcommunicative Perspectives on Plants.Bethany L. Ojalehto, Douglas L. Medin & Salino G. García - 2017 - Cognition 162:103-123.
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  • Naming the Living Things: Linguistic, Experiential and Cultural Factors in Wichí and Spanish Speaking Children.Andrea S. Taverna, Nora Moscoloni, Olga A. Peralta, Douglas L. Medin & Sandra R. Waxman - 2014 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 14 (3-4):213-233.
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  • Anthropocentric by Default? Attribution of Familiar and Novel Properties to Living Things.Melanie Arenson & John D. Coley - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (1):253-285.
    Humans naturally and effortlessly use a set of cognitive tools to reason about biological entities and phenomena. Two such tools, essentialist thinking and teleological thinking, appear to be early developmental cognitive defaults, used extensively in childhood and under limited circumstances in adulthood, but prone to reemerge under time pressure or cognitive load. We examine the nature of another such tool: anthropocentric thinking. In four experiments, we examined patterns of property attribution to a wide range of living and non-living objects, manipulating (...)
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  • Teleological Reasoning About Nature: Intentional Design or Relational Perspectives?Sandra R. Waxman & Douglas L. Medin - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):166-171.
  • Mechanisms of Theory Formation in Young Children.Alison Gopnik - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (8):371-377.
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  • Cultural Differences in Children’s Ecological Reasoning and Psychological Closeness to Nature: Evidence From Menominee and European American Children.Sara J. Unsworth, Douglas L. Medin, Sandra R. Waxman, Wallis Levin, Karen Washinawatok & Megan Bang - 2012 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 12 (1-2):17-29.
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  • Vitalistic Causality in Young Children's Naive Biology.Kayoko Inagaki & Giyoo Hatano - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (8):356-362.
  • Cross-Cultural Differences in Core Concepts of Humans as a Biological Species.Alexander Liu & Sara Jill Unsworth - 2014 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 14 (3-4):171-185.
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  • Maya Folk Botany and Knowledge Devolution: Modernization and Intra-Community Variability in the Acquisition of Folkbotanical Knowledge.Jeffrey Shenton, Norbert Ross, Michael Kohut & Sandra Waxman - 2011 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (3):349-367.
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  • Current Perspectives on Cognitive Diversity.Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Thinking About Biology. Modular Constraints on Categorization and Reasoning in the Everyday Life of Americans, Maya, and Scientists.Scott Atran, Douglas I. Medin & Norbert Ross - 2002 - Mind and Society 3 (2):31-63.
    This essay explores the universal cognitive bases of biological taxonomy and taxonomic inference using cross-cultural experimental work with urbanized Americans and forest-dwelling Maya Indians. A universal, essentialist appreciation of generic species appears as the causal foundation for the taxonomic arrangement of biodiversity, and for inference about the distribution of causally-related properties that underlie biodiversity. Universal folkbiological taxonomy is domain-specific: its structure does not spontaneously or invariably arise in other cognitive domains, like substances, artifacts or persons. It is plausibly an innately-determined (...)
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