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  1. Can Arousal Be Pleasurable?Marvin Zuckerman - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):449-449.
  • How Homeric is the Aristotelian Conception of Courage?Andrei G. Zavaliy - 2017 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 55 (3):350-377.
    When Aristotle limits the manifestation of true courage to the military context only, his primary target is an overly inclusive conception of courage presented by Plato in the Laches. At the same time, Aristotle explicitly tries to demarcate his ideal of genuine courage from the paradigmatic examples of courageous actions derived from the Homeric epics. It remains questionable, though, whether Aristotle is truly earnest in his efforts to distance himself from Homer. It will be argued that Aristotle's attempt to associate (...)
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  • The Second Stasimon of the "Oedipus Tyrannus".R. P. Winnington-Ingram - 1971 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 91:119-135.
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  • Emotional Disorder.Demian Whiting - 2004 - Ratio 17 (1):90-103.
  • The Soul Cluster: Reconsideration of a Millennia Old Concept.Hank Wesselman, Levente Móró & Ede Frecska - 2011 - World Futures 67 (2):132-153.
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  • Irony and Inspiration: Homer as the Test of Plato’s Philosophical Coherence in the Sixth Essay of Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic.Daniel James Watson - 2017 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 11 (2):149-172.
    _ Source: _Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 149 - 172 Even among sympathetic readers, there abides a sense that Proclus’ attachment to his authorities at least partially blinds him to Socratic irony. This has serious implications for his conciliation of Homer and Plato in the Sixth Essay of his _Commentary on the Republic_. A significant number of the passages in Plato’s dialogues, which Proclus takes as necessitating their agreement, appear to be examples of Socrates’ ironic mode. If this apparent necessity (...)
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  • Ωσπερ Οι Κορyβαντιωντεσ: The Corybantic Rites in Plato's Dialogues.Ellisif Wasmuth - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (1):69-84.
    Plato makes explicit references to Corybantic rites in six of his dialogues, spanning from the so-called early Crito to the later Laws. In all but one of these an analogy is established between aspects of the Corybantic rites and some kind of λόγος: the words of the poets in the Ion, Lysias' speech in the Phaedrus, and the arguments of Euthydemus and Dionysodorus, the personified Laws and Socrates in the Euthydemus, Crito and Symposium respectively. Plato's use of Corybantic analogies is (...)
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  • Some Notes on Language and Theology.J. Verhaar - 1969 - Bijdragen 30 (1):39-65.
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  • Does Introspection Have a Role in Brain-Behavior Research?C. H. Vanderwolf & M. A. Goodale - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):448-448.
  • Introspection and Science: The Problem of Standardizing Emotional Nomenclature.Holger Ursin - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):447-448.
  • 'Shame' as a Neglected Value in Schooling.David Tombs - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (1):23–32.
  • The Rat as Hedonist – A Systems Approach.Frederick M. Toates - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):446-447.
  • Unifying Themes in the Sculpture of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia.Nancy D. Tersini - 1987 - Classical Antiquity 6 (1):139-159.
  • Sages at the Games: Intellectual Displays and Dissemination of Wisdom in Ancient Greece.Håkan Tell - 2007 - Classical Antiquity 26 (2):249-275.
    This paper explores the role the Panhellenic centers played in facilitating the circulation of wisdom in ancient Greece. It argues that there are substantial thematic overlaps among practitioners of wisdom , who are typically understood as belonging to different categories . By focusing on the presence of σοφοί at the Panhellenic centers in general, and Delphi in particular, we can acquire a more accurate picture of the particular expertise they possessed, and of the range of meanings the Greeks attributed to (...)
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  • Commentary on Mitsis.Gisela Striker - 1988 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 4 (1):323-354.
  • Softening the Wires of Human Emotion.Michael Stocker - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):445-446.
  • Hesiod's Proem And Plato's Ion.Suzanne Stern-Gillet - 2014 - Classical Quarterly 64 (1):25-42.
    Plato's Hesiod is a neglected topic, scholars having long regarded Plato's Homer as a more promising field of inquiry. My aim in this chapter is to demonstrate that this particular bias of scholarly attention, although understandable, is unjustified. Of no other dialogue is this truer than of the Ion.
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  • Emotions, Ethics, and the "Internal Ought".Robert C. Solomon - 1996 - Cognition and Emotion 10 (5):529-550.
  • Emotional Cookbooks.Robert C. Solomon - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):444-445.
  • Diviners and Divination in Aristophanic Comedy.Nicholas D. Smith - 1989 - Classical Antiquity 8 (1):140-158.
  • 'In the Guise of Science' : Literature and the Rhetoric of 19th-Century English Psychiatry.Helen Small - 1994 - History of the Human Sciences 7 (1):27-55.
  • On the Nature of Specific Hard-Wired Brain Circuits.Allan Siegel - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):443-444.
  • Proclus' Attitude to Theurgy.Anne Sheppard - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (1):212-224.
    Theurgy, the religious magic practised by the later Neoplatonists, has been commonly regarded as the point at which Neoplatonism degenerates into magic, superstition and irrationalism.1 A superficial glance at the ancient lives of the Neoplatonists, and in particular at Eunapius’ Lives of the Sophists, reveals a group of people interested in animating statues, favoured with visions of gods and demons, and skilled in rain-making. But when we look more closely at the works of the Neoplatonists themselves, rather than the stories (...)
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  • On Misunderstanding Heraclitus: The Justice of Organisation Structure.David Shaw - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 18 (2):157-167.
    Writers on organisational change often refer to the cosmology of Heraclitus in their work. Some use these references to support arguments for the constancy and universality of organisational change and the consignment to history of organisational continuity and stability. These writers misunderstand the scope of what Heraclitus said. Other writers focus exclusively on the idea that originated with Heraclitus that the universe is composed of processes and not of things. This idea, which has been particularly associated with Heraclitus’s thought from (...)
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  • From Hippolyta to Hu: Colonization, Appropriation, and the Liberal Self.Michael J. Seidler - 1997 - The European Legacy 2 (7):1115-1136.
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  • Euboulia_ in the _Iliad.Malcolm Schofield - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (1):6-31.
    The word euboulia, which means excellence in counsel or sound judgement, occurs in only three places in the authentic writings of Plato. The sophist Protagoras makes euboulia the focus of his whole enterprise : What I teach a person is good judgement about his own affairs — how best he may manage his own household; and about the affairs of the city — how he may be most able to handle the business of the city both in action and in (...)
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  • On the Complexity of Emotion.Joseph R. Royce - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):443-443.
  • Risk Interpretation: Between Doctor and Patient.Fernando Rosa - 2004 - Topoi 23 (2):165-176.
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  • Psychological Agency: Theory, Practice, and Culture.Stephen Rojcewicz - 2009 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (2):223-230.
  • Helen in the Iliad; Ca Usa Belli and Victim of War: From Silent Weaver to Public Speaker.Hanna M. Roisman - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (1):1-36.
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  • Aristophanes' Adôniazousai.L. Reitzammer - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):282-333.
    A scholiast's note on Lysistrata mentions that there was an alternative title to the play: Adôniazousai. A close reading of the play with this title in mind reveals that Lysistrata and her allies metaphorically hold an Adonis festival atop the Acropolis. The Adonia, a festival that is typically regarded as “marginal” and “private” by modern scholars, thus becomes symbolically central and public as the sex-strike held by the women halts the Peloponnesian war. The public space of the Acropolis becomes, notionally, (...)
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  • Le genie anguipede alectro cephale: Une divinite magique solaire.Paul Post - 1979 - Bijdragen 40 (2):173-210.
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  • Only Four Command Systems for All Emotions?Robert Plutchik - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):442-443.
  • Spell-Breaking with Revitalizing Metaphors.Andrew Pinsent - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (1):3-15.
    Growing public interest in the dark arts, and the fact that even some philosophers have been accused of casting spells with their own writings, suggest that philosophers should not wholly neglect the topics of spells and spell-breaking. In this paper, written in honor of an effective spell-breaker in social and leadership contexts, Fr Theodore Vitali, I set out a taxonomy of spells and ways in which some philosophers may be said to cast them in a naturalistic sense. I also examine (...)
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  • Honor as a Motive for Making Sacrifices.Peter Olsthoorn - 2005 - Journal of Military Ethics 4 (3):183-197.
    This article deals with the notion of honor and its relation to the willingness to make sacrifices. There is a widely shared feeling, especially in Western countries, that the willingness to make sacrifices for the greater good has been on a reverse trend for quite a while both on the individual and the societal levels, and that this is increasingly problematic to the military. First of all, an outline of what honor is will be given. After that, the Roman honor-ethic, (...)
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  • Περι Απιστων.Reina Marisol Troca Pereira - 2016 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):140-302.
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  • Toward a General Psychobiological Theory of Emotions.Jaak Panksepp - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):407-422.
  • Archaeology of Mind.Jaak Panksepp - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):449-467.
  • Masculinity as Virility in Tahar Ben Jelloun's Work.Lahoucine Ouzgane - 1997 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 4 (1):1-13.
  • A Critique of Steven Katz’s “Contextualism”: An Asian Perspective.Shigenori Nagatomo - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):185-207.
  • Psychobiology Needs Cognitive Psychology.Adam Morton - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):441-442.
  • Colloquium 3.Mark L. McPherran - 1993 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 9 (1):112-129.
  • Colloquium 6.Alison McIntyre - 1990 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1):228-239.
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  • Decision.Storrs McCall - 1987 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):261 - 287.
    We all make decisions, sometimes dozens in the course of a day. This paper is about what is involved in this activity. It's my contention that the ability to deliberate, to weigh different courses of action, and then to decide on one of them, is a distinctively human activity, or at least an activity which sets man and the higher animals apart from other creatures. It is as much decisio as ratio that constitutes the distinguishing mark of human beings. Homo (...)
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  • Possessed and Inspired: Hermias on Divine Madness.Christina-Panagiota Manolea - 2013 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 7 (2):156-179.
    Hermias of Alexandria wrote down the lectures given on the Phaedrus by his teacher Syrianus, Head of the Neoplatonic School of Athens. In the preserved text the Platonic distinction of madness is presented in a Neoplatonic way. In the first section of the article we discuss Hermias’ treatment of possession. The philosopher examines four topics in his effort to present a Neoplatonic doctrine concerning possession. As he holds that divine possession is evident in all parts of the soul, he first (...)
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  • The Descent of Shame1.Heidi L. Maibom - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):566-594.
    Shame is a painful emotion concerned with failure to live up to certain standards, norms, or ideals. The subject feels that she falls in the regard of others; she feels watched and exposed. As a result, she feels bad about the person that she is. The most popular view of shame is that someone only feels ashamed if she fails to live up to standards, norms, or ideals that she, herself, accepts. In this paper, I provide support for a different (...)
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  • Concerning the Alleged Four Basic Emotions.William Lyons - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):440-441.
  • Introspection and Cultural Knowledge Systems.Catherine Lutz - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):439-440.
  • Psychobiology Without Psychosocial Significance.Richard S. Lazarus - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):438-439.
  • Generality and Specifics in Psychobiological Theory of Emotions.Eric Klinger & Ernest D. Kemble - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):437-438.