Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Purification Through Emotions: The Role of Shame in Plato’s Sophist 230b4–E5.Laura Candiotto - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (6-7):576-585.
    This article proposes an analysis of Plato’s Sophist that underlines the bond between the logical and the emotional components of the Socratic elenchus, with the aim of depicting the social valence of this philosophical practice. The use of emotions characterizing the ‘elenctic’ method described by Plato is crucial in influencing the audience and is introduced at the very moment in which the interlocutor attempts to protect his social image by concealing his shame at being refuted. The audience, thanks to Plato’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Descent of Shame1.Heidi L. Maibom - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):566-594.
    Shame is a painful emotion concerned with failure to live up to certain standards, norms, or ideals. The subject feels that she falls in the regard of others; she feels watched and exposed. As a result, she feels bad about the person that she is. The most popular view of shame is that someone only feels ashamed if she fails to live up to standards, norms, or ideals that she, herself, accepts. In this paper, I provide support for a different (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Aristotle and Confucius on the Socioeconomics of Shame.Thorian R. Harris - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):323-342.
    The sociopolitical significance Aristotle and Confucius attribute to possessing a sense of shame serves to emphasize the importance of its development. Aristotle maintains that social class and wealth are prerequisites for its acquisition, while Confucius is optimistic that it can be developed regardless of socioeconomic considerations. The difference between their positions is largely due to competing views of praiseworthy dispositions. While Aristotle conceives of praiseworthy dispositions as “consistent” traits of character, traits that calcifiy as one reaches adulthood, Confucius offers us (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Persuasion, Falsehood, and Motivating Reason in Plato’s Laws.Nicholas R. Baima - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (2).
    In Plato’s Laws, the Athenian Stranger maintains that law should consist of both persuasion (πειθώ) and compulsion (βία) (IV.711c, IV.718b-d, and IV.722b). Persuasion can be achieved by prefacing the laws with preludes (προοίμια), which make the citizens more eager to obey the laws. Although scholars disagree on how to interpret the preludes’ persuasion, they agree that the preludes instill true beliefs and give citizens good reasons for obeying the laws. In this paper I refine this account of the preludes by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Sages at the Games: Intellectual Displays and Dissemination of Wisdom in Ancient Greece.Hååkan Tell - 2007 - Classical Antiquity 26 (2):249-275.
    This paper explores the role the Panhellenic centers played in facilitating the circulation of wisdom in ancient Greece. It argues that there are substantial thematic overlaps among practitioners of wisdom , who are typically understood as belonging to different categories . By focusing on the presence of σοφοί at the Panhellenic centers in general, and Delphi in particular, we can acquire a more accurate picture of the particular expertise they possessed, and of the range of meanings the Greeks attributed to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Euhemerus in Context.Franco De Angelis De Angelis & Benjamin Garstad - 2006 - Classical Antiquity 25 (2):211-242.
    Euhemerus, the famous theorist on the nature of the gods who lived around 300 BC, has usually been discussed as a disembodied intellectual figure, with scholars focusing on his literary and philosophical sources and influence. Although he is called “Euhemerus of Messene,” there is uncertainty as to where he was born, lived, and worked, in particular whether he came from Sicilian or Peloponnesian Messene. Until now, the conquests of Alexander the Great and the establishment of the Successor Kingdoms have been (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Aristophanes'Adôniazousai.L. Reitzammer - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):282-333.
    A scholiast's note on Lysistrata mentions that there was an alternative title to the play: Adôniazousai. A close reading of the play with this title in mind reveals that Lysistrata and her allies metaphorically hold an Adonis festival atop the Acropolis. The Adonia, a festival that is typically regarded as “marginal” and “private” by modern scholars, thus becomes symbolically central and public as the sex-strike held by the women halts the Peloponnesian war. The public space of the Acropolis becomes, notionally, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Delusion and Dream in Apuleius' Metamorphoses.Vered Lev Kenaan - 2004 - Classical Antiquity 23 (2):247-284.
    Considering the absence of any ancient systematic approach to the reading of the novel, this paper turns to ancient dream hermeneutics as a valuable field of reference that can provide the theoretical framework for studying the ancient novel within its own cultural context. In introducing dream interpretation as one of the ancient novel's creative sources, this essay focuses on Apuleius' Metamorphoses. It explores the dream logic in Apuleius' novel by turning to such authorities as Heraclitus, Plato, Cicero, Artemidorus, and Macrobius, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Euripides' Heracles in the Flesh.Brooke Holmes - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):231-281.
    In this article, I analyze the role of Heracles' famous body in the representation of madness and its aftermath in Euripides' Heracles. Unlike studies of Trachiniae, interpretations of Heracles have neglected the hero's body in Euripides. This reading examines the eruption of that body midway through the tragedy as a part of Heracles that is daemonic and strange, but also integral to his identity. Central to my reading is the figure of the symptom, through which madness materializes onstage. Symptoms were (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Mystery Inquisitors: Performance, Authority, and Sacrilege at Eleusis.Renaud Gagnéé - 2009 - Classical Antiquity 28 (2):211-247.
    The master narrative of a profound crisis in traditional faith leading to a hardening of authority and religious persecution in late fifth-century Athens has a long scholarly history, one that maintains a persistent presence in current research. This paper proposes to reexamine some aspects of religious authority in late fifth-century Athens through one case-study: the trial of Andocides in 400 BCE. Instead of proposing a new reconstruction of the events that led to this trial, it will compare and contrast the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Discourse and Performance: Involvement, Visualization and `Presence' in Homeric Poetry.Egbert J. Bakker - 1993 - Classical Antiquity 12 (1):1-29.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Unifying Themes in the Sculpture of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia.Nancy D. Tersini - 1987 - Classical Antiquity 6 (1):139-159.
  • Diviners and Divination in Aristophanic Comedy.Nicholas D. Smith - 1989 - Classical Antiquity 8 (1):140-158.
  • On Misunderstanding Heraclitus: The Justice of Organisation Structure.David Shaw - 2018 - Philosophy of Management 18 (2):157-167.
    Writers on organisational change often refer to the cosmology of Heraclitus in their work. Some use these references to support arguments for the constancy and universality of organisational change and the consignment to history of organisational continuity and stability. These writers misunderstand the scope of what Heraclitus said. Other writers focus exclusively on the idea that originated with Heraclitus that the universe is composed of processes and not of things. This idea, which has been particularly associated with Heraclitus’s thought from (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Aeschynē in Aristotle's Conception of Human Nature.Melissa Marie Coakley - unknown
    This dissertation provides a thorough examination of the role of aeschynē in Aristotle’s conception of human nature by illuminating the political and ethical implications of shame and shamelessness and the effect of these implications in his treatises. It is crucial, both to one’s own personhood and eudaimonia as well as to the existence of a just and balanced state, that aeschynē be understood and respected because of the self-evaluating ability that it maintains. The aim of this work is to show (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Colloquium 6.Alison McIntyre - 1990 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 6 (1):228-239.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Imre Lakatos.Paul Feyerabend - 1975 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 26 (1):1-18.
  • Περι Απιστων.Reina Marisol Troca Pereira - 2016 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 10 (2):140-302.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Consciousness, Non-Conscious Experiences and Functions, Proto-Experiences and Proto-Functions, and Subjective Experiences.Ram L. P. Vimal - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (3):383-389.
    A general definition of consciousness that accommodates most views (Vimal, 2010b) is: “ ‘consciousness is a mental aspect of a system or a process, which is a conscious experience, a conscious function, or both depending on the context and particular bias (e.g. metaphysical assumptions)’, where experiences can be conscious experiences and/or non-conscious experiences and functions can be conscious functions and/or non-conscious functions that include qualities of objects. These are a posteriori definitions because they are based on observations and the categorization.” (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Irony and Inspiration: Homer as the Test of Plato’s Philosophical Coherence in the Sixth Essay of Proclus’ Commentary on the Republic.Daniel James Watson - 2017 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 11 (2):149-172.
    _ Source: _Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 149 - 172 Even among sympathetic readers, there abides a sense that Proclus’ attachment to his authorities at least partially blinds him to Socratic irony. This has serious implications for his conciliation of Homer and Plato in the Sixth Essay of his _Commentary on the Republic_. A significant number of the passages in Plato’s dialogues, which Proclus takes as necessitating their agreement, appear to be examples of Socrates’ ironic mode. If this apparent necessity (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Imagining the Afterlife.K. Mitch Hodge - 2011 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (3-4):367-389.
    The author argues for three interconnected theses which provide a cognitive account for why humans intuitively believe that others survive death. The first thesis, from which the second and third theses follow, is that the acceptance of afterlife beliefs is predisposed by a specific, and already well-documented, imaginative process - the offline social reasoning process. The second thesis is that afterlife beliefs are social in nature. The third thesis is that the living imagine the deceased as socially embodied in such (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Euhemerus in Context.Franco Angelis de Angelides & Benjamin Garstad - 2006 - Classical Antiquity 25 (2):211-242.
    Euhemerus, the famous theorist on the nature of the gods who lived around 300 BC, has usually been discussed as a disembodied intellectual figure, with scholars focusing on his literary and philosophical sources and influence. Although he is called “Euhemerus of Messene,” there is uncertainty as to where he was born, lived, and worked, in particular whether he came from Sicilian or Peloponnesian Messene. Until now, the conquests of Alexander the Great and the establishment of the Successor Kingdoms have been (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ¿ Hubo Ritos de Paso Cruentos En El Orfismo?Ana Isabel Jiménez San Cristóbal - 2009 - Synthesis (la Plata) 16.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commentary on Mitsis.Gisela Striker - 1988 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 4 (1):323-354.
  • Contributions of Neuropsychology to the Study of Ancient Literature.Franco Fabbro, Anastasia Fabbro & Cristiano Crescentini - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • ‘Mere Bellies’?: A New Look atTheogony26–8.Joshua T. Katz & Katharina Volk - 2000 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 120:122-131.
    One of the most famous scenes in classical literature is theDichterweiheat the beginning of theTheogony: when Hesiod was tending his sheep below Mount Helicon, the Muses approached him, provided him with a staff and a divine voice, and told him to sing of the blessed, everlasting gods.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Great Dionysia and Civic Ideology.Simon Goldhill - 1987 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 107:58-76.
    There have been numerous attempts to understand the role and importance of the Great Dionysia in Athens, and it is a festival that has been made crucial to varied and important characterizations of Greek culture as well as the history of drama or literature. Recent scholarship, however, has greatly extended our understanding of the formation of fifth-century Athenian ideology—in the sense of the structure of attitudes and norms of behaviour—and this developing interest in what might be called a ‘civic discourse’ (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Zeus in Aeschylus.Hugh Lloyd-Jones - 1956 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 76:55-67.
    After a hundred and thirty years of controversy, the interpretation of thePrometheus Boundis still the subject of debate. To the romantic poets of the revolutionary era, the Titan tortured by Zeus for his services to mankind appeared as a symbol of the human spirit in its struggle to throw off the chains which priests and kings had forged for it. But to the distinguished Hellenists who after the fall of Napoleon laid the foundations of the great century of German scholarship, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Tearing Apart the Zagreus Myth: A Few Disparaging Remarks on Orphism and Original Sin.Radcliffe G. Edmonds Iii - 1999 - Classical Antiquity 18 (1):35.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Natural Drift and the Evolution of Culture.William I. Thompson - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (11):96-116.
  • Poltergeist: quem tem medo de φαντάσματα?Reina Marisol Troca Pereira - 2016 - Revista de Estudios Clásicos 43:211-232.
    El presente artículo contiene breves observaciones con respecto a la mitología como elemento recurrente en la Antigüedad Clásica. Además de suministrar realidades y acontecimientos inauditos, la paradoxografía también nos ofrece episodios de apariciones fantasmagóricas. Una mirada más atenta sobre Mirabilia 1-3, de Flegón, provee información relativa a fenómenos sobrenaturales en el mundo griego antiguo.
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Psychological Agency: Theory, Practice, and Culture.Stephen Rojcewicz - 2009 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (2):223-230.
  • Responsibility and Justice in Aristotle’s Non-Voluntary and Mixed Actions.Andre Santos Campos - 2013 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 7 (2):100.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Building Beauty: Kantian Aesthetics in a Time of Dark Ecology.K. August - unknown
    In the aftermath of a normalized Foucaultian world with an all encompassing web of biopower, one remaining hope is to cultivate nimbleness. Nimbleness is an embodied aesthetic sensitivity to the material presence. Cultivating nimbleness is a particular style of cultivation; it is to willfully gather together one’s self in the wake of a formative force far richer than the derivative web of living power relationships of human embeddness within a horizon of social, economical, political and historical subjectivating power relations; which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Star Music: The Ancient Idea of Cosmic Music as a Philosophical Paradox.E. Heyning - manuscript
    This thesis regards the ancient Pythagorean-Platonic idea of heavenly harmony as a philosophical paradox: stars are silent, music is not. The idea of ‘star music’ contains several potential opposites, including imagination and sense perception, the temporal and the eternal, transcendence and theophany, and others. The idea of ‘star music’ as a paradox can become a gateway to a different understanding of the universe, and a vehicle for a shift to a new – and yet very ancient – form of consciousness. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Colloquium 3.Mark L. McPherran - 1993 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 9 (1):112-129.
  • Commentary on Inwood.Margaret Graver - 1999 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):44-56.
  • Deep Disagreement and the Virtues of Argumentative and Epistemic Incapacity.Jeremy Barris - 2018 - Informal Logic 38 (3):369-408.
    Fogelin’s Wittgensteinian view of deep disagreement as allowing no rational resolution has been criticized from both argumentation theoretic and epistemological perspectives. These criticisms typically do not recognize how his point applies to the very argumentative resources on which they rely. Additionally, more extremely than Fogelin himself argues, the conditions of deep disagreement make each position literally unintelligible to the other, again disallowing rational resolution. In turn, however, this failure of sense is so extreme that it partly cancels its own meaning (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The First Sophists and Feminism: Discourses of the "Other".Susan C. Jarratt - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (1):27 - 41.
    In this essay, I explore the parallel between the historical exclusions of rhetoric from philosophy and of women from fields of rational discourse. After considering the usefulness and limitations of deconstruction for exposing marginalization by hierarchical systems, I explore links between texts of the sophists and feminist proposals for rewriting/rereading history by Cixous, Spivak, and others. I conclude that sophistic rhetoric offers a flexible alternative to philosophy as an intellectual framework for mediating theoretical oppositions among contemporary feminisms.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The First Sophists and Feminism: Discourses of the “Other”.Susan C. Jarratt - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (1):27-41.
    In this essay, I explore the parallel between the historical exclusions of rhetoric from philosophy and of women from fields of rational discourse. After considering the usefulness and limitations of deconstruction for exposing marginalization by hierarchical systems, I explore links between texts of the sophists and feminist proposals for rewriting/rereading history by Cixous, Spivak, and others. I conclude that sophistic rhetoric offers a flexible alternative to philosophy as an intellectual framework for mediating theoretical oppositions among contemporary feminisms.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Descent of Shame.Heidi L. Maibom - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):566 - 594.
    Shame is a painful emotion concerned with failure to live up to certain standards, norms, or ideals. The subject feels that she falls in the regard of others; she feels watched and exposed. As a result, she feels bad about the person that she is. The most popular view of shame is that someone only feels ashamed if she fails to live up to standards, norms, or ideals that she, herself, accepts. In this paper, I provide support for a different (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Decision.Storrs McCall - 1987 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):261 - 287.
    We all make decisions, sometimes dozens in the course of a day. This paper is about what is involved in this activity. It's my contention that the ability to deliberate, to weigh different courses of action, and then to decide on one of them, is a distinctively human activity, or at least an activity which sets man and the higher animals apart from other creatures. It is as much decisio as ratio that constitutes the distinguishing mark of human beings. Homo (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • From Hippolyta to Hu: Colonization, Appropriation, and the Liberal Self.Michael J. Seidler - 1997 - The European Legacy 2 (7):1115-1136.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Nanotechnological Golem.Alexei Grinbaum - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (3):191-198.
    We give reasons for the importance of old narratives, including myths, in ethical thinking about science and technology. On the example of a legend about creating artificial men we explore the side effects of having too much success and the problem of intermediate social status of bioengineered artefacts.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Theognis of Megara and the Divine Creating Power in the Framework of Semiotic Textology: An Application of János Sándor Petöfi’s Theory to Archaic Greek Literature. [REVIEW]Mauro Giuffrè - 2012 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 21 (3):325-346.
    This paper is a demonstration of an application of Semiotic Textology to a limited case study. The main aspects of Semiotic Textology, the theory elaborated by Petöfi, are presented; secondly the linguistic aspects of the interpretation of lines 133–134 of the Theognis of Megara’s poem, analysed in the framework of said theory, are presented. All the relevant syntactic, semantic, pragmatic information involved in text processing have been considered. Through fixed steps, it is shown that text processing is not exclusively a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Risk Interpretation: Between Doctor and Patient.Fernando Rosa - 2004 - Topoi 23 (2):165-176.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Beyond Postmodernism: Restoring the Primal Quest for Meaning to Political Inquiry. [REVIEW]Louis Herman - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (1):75-94.
    My paper picks up a long ignored suggestion of Sheldon Wolin - that we use Thomas Kuhn''s analysis of scientific revolutions to examine the crisis of "normal" political science. This approach allows us to see the connection between the state of the discipline and the larger crisis of meaning afflicting modernity. I then use Eric Voegelin''s notion of a multicivilizational "truth quest" - or search for meaning - to make a case for institutionalizing "extraordinary" or "revolutionary" political science. I attempt (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Critique of Steven Katz’s “Contextualism”: An Asian Perspective.Shigenori Nagatomo - 2002 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 1 (2):185-207.
  • Some Notes on Language and Theology.J. Verhaar - 1969 - Bijdragen 30 (1):39-65.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Possessed and Inspired: Hermias on Divine Madness.Christina-Panagiota Manolea - 2013 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 7 (2):156-179.
    Hermias of Alexandria wrote down the lectures given on the Phaedrus by his teacher Syrianus, Head of the Neoplatonic School of Athens. In the preserved text the Platonic distinction of madness is presented in a Neoplatonic way. In the first section of the article we discuss Hermias’ treatment of possession. The philosopher examines four topics in his effort to present a Neoplatonic doctrine concerning possession. As he holds that divine possession is evident in all parts of the soul, he first (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation