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Carolyn Rovee-Collier, Harlene Hayne & Michael Colombo (eds.) (2001). The Development of Implicit and Explicit Memory.

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  1.  23
    Retrieval Dynamics and Retention in Cross‐Situational Statistical Word Learning.Haley A. Vlach & Catherine M. Sandhofer - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (4):757-774.
    Previous research on cross-situational word learning has demonstrated that learners are able to reduce ambiguity in mapping words to referents by tracking co-occurrence probabilities across learning events. In the current experiments, we examined whether learners are able to retain mappings over time. The results revealed that learners are able to retain mappings for up to 1 week later. However, there were interactions between the amount of retention and the different learning conditions. Interestingly, the strongest retention was associated with a learning (...)
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    The Cost of Explicit Memory.Stephen E. Robbins - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):33-66.
    Within Piaget there is an implicit theory of the development of explicit memory. It rests in the dynamical trajectory underlying the development of causality, object, space and time – a complex (COST) supporting a symbolic relationship integral to the explicit. Cassirer noted the same dependency in the phenomena of aphasias, insisting that a symbolic function is being undermined in these deficits. This is particularly critical given the reassessment of Piaget’s stages as the natural bifurcations of a self-organizing dynamic system. The (...)
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