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When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility

Indiana University Press (1998)

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  1. Experts' Attitudes Towards Medical Futility: An Empirical Survey From Japan. [REVIEW]Alireza Bagheri, Atsushi Asai & Ryuichi Ida - 2006 - BMC Medical Ethics 7 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundThe current debate about medical futility is mostly driven by theoretical and personal perspectives and there is a lack of empirical data to document experts and public attitudes towards medical futility.MethodsTo examine the attitudes of the Japanese experts in the fields relevant to medical futility a questionnaire survey was conducted among the members of the Japan Association for Bioethics. A total number of 108 questionnaires returned filled in, giving a response rate of 50.9%. Among the respondents 62% were healthcare professionals (...)
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  • Character Formation in Professional Education: A Word of Caution.Robert M. Veatch - 2006 - Advances in Bioethics 10:29-45.
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  • Understanding Futility: Why Trust and Disparate Impact Matter as Much as What Works.Greg Loeben - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):38 – 39.
  • Multiculturalism and End-of-Life Care: The New Israeli Law for the Terminally III Patient.Alan Jotkowitz & Avraham Steinberg - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):17 – 19.
  • Our Cultures, Our Selves: Toward an Honest Dialogue on Race and End-of-Life Decisions.Mark G. Kuczewski - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):13 – 17.
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  • Asia-Pacific Perspectives on the Medical Ethics.Darryl R. J. Macer - 2008 - UNESCO Bangkok.
    A compilation of 16 papers selected from two UNESCO Bangkok Bioethics Roundtables, with research and policy dialogues from different countries in the region. It includes papers on informed consent, ethics committees, communication, organ transplants, traditional medicines and sex selection.
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  • The Development of "Medical Futility": Towards a Procedural Approach Based on the Role of the Medical Profession.S. Moratti - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):369-372.
    Over the past 50 years, technical advances have taken place in medicine that have greatly increased the possibilities of life-prolonging intervention. The increased possibilities of intervening have brought along new ethical questions. Not everything that is technically possible is appropriate in a specific case: not everything that could be done should be done. In the 1980s, a new term was coined to indicate a class of inappropriate interventions: “medically futile treatment”. A debate followed, with contributions from the USA and several (...)
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  • Is There a Lingua Franca for Bioethics at the End of Life?Arthur R. Derse - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):279-284.
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  • Editorial Introduction: Futility in the 21st Century. [REVIEW]Griffin Trotter - 2007 - HEC Forum 19 (1):1-12.
  • If We Think It’s Futile, Can’T We Just Say No?Susan B. Rubin - 2007 - HEC Forum 19 (1):45-65.
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  • Is There a Lingua Franca for Bioethics at the End of Life?Arthur R. Derse - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (3):279-284.
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  • Medical Futility in the Post-Modern Context.John Paul Slosar - 2007 - HEC Forum 19 (1):67-82.
  • Praying to Die.Jonathan K. Crane - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (1):1-27.
    Prayer has long been a staple in the proverbial Jewish medical toolbox. While the vast majority of relevant prayers seek renewed health and prolonged life, what might prayers for someone to die look like? What ethical dimensions are involved in such liturgical expressions? By examining both prayers for oneself to die and prayers for someone else to die, this essay discerns reasons why it may be good and even necessary to pray for a patient's demise.
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  • Aspekte der künstlichen Ernährung bei demenzkranken Patienten in der Geriatrie.Dr med Eduard Rappold & Harald G. Kratochvila - 2004 - Ethik in der Medizin 16 (3):253-264.
    Wenn man davon ausgeht, dass eine der Voraussetzungen für ein gut fundiertes moralisches Urteil im Bereich der Medizin ein adäquates Verständnis der medizinischen Gegebenheiten und Zusammenhänge ist, dann muss diesem Aspekt bei der Beurteilung der künstlichen Ernährung bei fortgeschritten Demenzerkrankten in Zukunft mehr Aufmerksamkeit geschenkt werden. Damit verbunden ist die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit aktuellen empirischen Untersuchungen, anhand derer es gerechtfertigt scheint, die künstliche Ernährung bei dementen Patienten als erfolglos hinsichtlich des Ernährungszustands, der Verbesserung der Lebensqualität und der Überlebenszeit zu bezeichnen. (...)
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