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David Wÿss Rudge (2006). H.B.D. Kettlewell's Research 1937-1953: The Influence of E.B. Ford, E.A. Cockayne and P.M. Sheppard.

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    Observation Versus Experiment: An Adequate Framework for Analysing Scientific Experimentation?Saira Malik - 2017 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 48 (1):71-95.
    Observation and experiment as categories for analysing scientific practice have a long pedigree in writings on science. There has, however, been little attempt to delineate observation and experiment with respect to analysing scientific practice; in particular, scientific experimentation, in a systematic manner. Someone who has presented a systematic account of observation and experiment as categories for analysing scientific experimentation is Ian Hacking. In this paper, I present a detailed analysis of Hacking’s observation versus experiment account. Using a range of cases (...)
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    Rethinking the Synthesis Period in Evolutionary Studies.Joe Cain - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (4):621 - 648.
    I propose we abandon the unit concept of "the evolutionary synthesis". There was much more to evolutionary studies in the 1920s and 1930s than is suggested in our commonplace narratives of this object in history. Instead, four organising threads capture much of evolutionary studies at this time. First, the nature of species and the process of speciation were dominating, unifying subjects. Second, research into these subjects developed along four main lines, or problem complexes: variation, divergence, isolation, and selection. Some calls (...)
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