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Carly Ruderman, C. Tracy, Cécile Bensimon, Mark Bernstein, Laura Hawryluck, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Ross Upshur (2006). On Pandemics and the Duty to Care: Whose Duty? Who Cares? [REVIEW]

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  1.  6
    Can Healthcare Workers Reasonably Question the Duty to Care Whilst Healthcare Institutions Take a Reactive Approach to Infectious Disease Risks?Michael Millar & Desmond T. S. Hsu - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phw037.
    Healthcare workers carry a substantial risk of harm from infectious disease, particularly, but not exclusively, during outbreaks. More can be done by healthcare institutions to identify risks, quantify the current burden of preventable infectious disease amongst HCWs and identify opportunities for prevention. We suggest that institutional obligations should be clarified with respect to the mitigation of infectious disease risks to staff, and question the duty of HCWs to care while healthcare institutions persist with a reactive rather than proactive attitude to (...)
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  2.  12
    Everyday Ethics and Ebola: Planning for the Unlikely.Carla C. Keirns - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):68-70.
  3.  3
    Ethics-Sensitivity of the Ghana National Integrated Strategic Response Plan for Pandemic Influenza.Amos Laar & Debra DeBruin - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):30.
    Many commentators call for a more ethical approach to planning for influenza pandemics. In the developed world, some pandemic preparedness plans have already been examined from an ethical viewpoint. This paper assesses the attention given to ethics issues by the Ghana National Integrated Strategic Plan for Pandemic Influenza.
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  4.  32
    In Defense of Altered Standards of Care for Ebola Infections in Developed Countries.Philip M. Rosoff - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (1):1-9.
    The current outbreak of Ebola virus infection in West Africa continues to spread. Several patients have now been treated in the United States and preparations are being made for more. Because of the strict isolation required for their care, questions have been raised about what diagnostic and therapeutic interventions should be available. I discuss the ethical challenges associated with caring for patients in strict isolation and personnel wearing bulky protective gear with reduced dexterity and flexibility, the limitations this may place (...)
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  5.  16
    Currents in Contemporary Bioethics.Mark A. Rothstein - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):394-400.
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  6.  12
    Non-Professional Healthcare Workers and Ethical Obligations to Work During Pandemic Influenza.H. Draper, T. Sorell, J. Ives, S. Damery, S. Greenfield, J. Parry, J. Petts & S. Wilson - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):23-34.
    Most academic papers on ethics in pandemics concentrate on the duties of healthcare professionals. This paper will consider non-professional healthcare workers: do they have a moral obligation to work during an influenza pandemic? If so, is this an obligation that outweighs others they might have, e.g., as parents, and should such an obligation be backed up by the coercive power of law? This paper considers whether non-professional healthcare workers—porters, domestic service workers, catering staff, clerks, IT support workers, etc.—have an obligation (...)
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  7.  1
    Currents in Contemporary Ethics.Mark A. Rothstein - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):412-419.
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  8.  54
    Research Ethics and International Epidemic Response: The Case of Ebola and Marburg Hemorrhagic Fevers.Philippe Calain, Nathalie Fiore, Marc Poncin & Samia A. Hurst - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):7-29.
    Institute for Biomedical Ethics, Geneva University Medical School * Corresponding author: Médecins Sans Frontières (OCG), rue de Lausanne 78, CH-1211 Geneva 21, Switzerland. Tel.: +41 (0)22 849 89 29; Fax: +41 (0)22 849 84 88; Email: philippe_calain{at}hotmail.com ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Outbreaks of filovirus (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fevers in Africa are typically the theater of rescue activities involving international experts and agencies tasked with reinforcing national authorities in clinical management, biological diagnosis, sanitation, (...)
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  9.  12
    A Duty to Treat During a Pandemic? The Time for Talk is Now.Tracey M. Bailey, Rhonda J. Rosychuk, Olive Yonge & Thomas J. Marrie - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):29 – 31.
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  10.  5
    Refusal to Care.Rebecca F. Cady - 2008 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 10 (2):42-45.
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  11.  40
    Ethics, Pandemics, and the Duty to Treat.Heidi Malm, Thomas May, Leslie P. Francis, Saad B. Omer, Daniel A. Salmon & Robert Hood - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):4 – 19.
    Numerous grounds have been offered for the view that healthcare workers have a duty to treat, including expressed consent, implied consent, special training, reciprocity (also called the social contract view), and professional oaths and codes. Quite often, however, these grounds are simply asserted without being adequately defended or without the defenses being critically evaluated. This essay aims to help remedy that problem by providing a critical examination of the strengths and weaknesses of each of these five grounds for asserting that (...)
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  12.  5
    Duty to Care: Acknowledging Complexity and Uncertainty.Ross Upshur & Sioban Nelson - 2008 - Nursing Inquiry 15 (4):261-262.
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  13.  18
    Ethics and Public Health Emergencies: Encouraging Responsibility.Matthew K. Wynia - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):1 – 4.
    The three primary ethical challenges in preparing for public health emergencies - addressing questions of rationing, restrictions and responsibilities - all entail confronting uncertainty. But the third, considering whether people and institutions will live up to their responsibilities in a crisis, is perhaps the hardest to predict and therefore plan for. The quintessential example of a responsibility during a public health emergency is that of health care professionals' obligation to continue caring for patients during epidemics. Historically, this 'duty to treat' (...)
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